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Acer kicks Dell out of number two spot in notebook shipments

The recession has had a significant impact on global PC shipments and has led many consumers to shop for netbooks rather than notebook computers. That means that some computer makers that were relatively unknown a few years ago prior to the netbook revolution are now featured much more prominently.

Research firm DisplaySearch has issued its latest findings for the notebook PC market for Q1 2009. According to the company, netbooks have grown to almost 20% of the notebook market during the quarter. The clear leader in the netbook market remains Acer with a full 30.5% of the netbook market. The second place netbook maker was ASUS; the firm that helped start the netbook revolution with its Eee netbooks. DisplaySearch reports that Acer sold twice as many netbooks as ASUS.

The penetration rate for netbooks was highest in EMEA and Latin America according to DisplaySearch and lowest in China and America. About 45% of all netbooks shipped went to EMEA for the quarter while only 26% of netbooks shipped to North America. One of the things that helped the European grab so much of the netbook market is the fact that many mobile phone service providers offer subsidized netbooks in Europe. That sort of offer is still a rarity in America.

In the notebook category the dominant company was HP with 24.1% of the notebook market – the company shipped over 7.3 million notebooks. Acer grabbed the second place spot for global notebook shipments from Dell as Dell slipped to the number three spot. DailyTech reported in early May that Acer could steal Dell's number two spot. Acer had the largest percentage of its shipments accounted for by netbooks at 31.6%. The other major manufacturers including Dell, HP, Lenovo, and Toshiba all had under 10% of their shipments come from netbooks.

HP's netbook shipments dropped 22% from Q4 2008 to Q1 2009, as did its notebook shipments with an 11% decline for the same period. Acer saw netbook shipments decline 18% from Q4 2008 to Q1 2009 and its notebook shipments declined 9%. Dell saw no decline in its netbook shipments over the Q4 2008 Q1 2009 time frame, though its notebook shipments dropped 19% over the period. ASUS posted the most extreme declines of all the top notebook makers with netbook shipments dropping 47% from Q4 to Q1 and notebook shipments dropping the same amount.

DisplaySearch analyst John F. Jacobs said, "It is clear at the moment that mini-notes play a vital role in the total PC market. Without the additional volume provided by these products, shipment volumes for the notebook PC market would have been down 19% Y/Y, instead of only falling 3%. While there is no doubt that many buyers of mini-notes would have chosen larger notebook PCs if mini-notes were not available, it is also certain that many buyers might have chosen not to purchase a notebook PC at all."

Some analysts and computer makers feel that the netbook is killing the notebook market as consumers flock to the cheaper systems and stay away from higher margin notebooks. As the economy rebounds the netbook may see its market share begin to decline.



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RE: Something does not add up
By mmntech on 5/14/2009 3:08:31 PM , Rating: 0
What does Apple have to do with this article? Regardless, you can't compare them to Dell or HP simply because they're not the same thing. Apple caters to a different demographic than most netbook manufacturers do. Namely people working on media creation and editing as opposed to budget consumers who just want a cheap internet box. That accounts for the sales figures. Markets even within the same industry are not homogeneous.


RE: Something does not add up
By omnicronx on 5/14/2009 3:46:14 PM , Rating: 2
While he is being offtopic, you obviously missed the entire point of his question. Sales are down for laptops as a whole and netbooks are taking notebook share, so they are kind of getting a double whammy in terms of lost sales. This is why Apple is relevent, as they are part of that notebook sector that is losing sales.

People are forgoing traditional laptops for smaller netbooks, so even Apple is going to be effected here. That being said, Apples numbers are probably accurate, they have been getting steady gains for the past few years, so a 2% loss year over year is pretty bad for them.


RE: Something does not add up
By michael2k on 5/14/2009 3:58:57 PM , Rating: 3
I don't think he missed the point at all. You can't say Apple is part of the market that is losing sales when they only lost 2% where everyone else lost 19%.

Normal PC vendors saw a 19% drop in notebook sales; Apple only dropped 2%.
Normal PC vendors saw a 20% rise in netbook sales, which means substituting a several hundred dollar margin product with a less than one hundred dollar margin product. Apple saw nearly 100% growth in iPod/iPhone sales (which was Apple's economic substitute for a netbook)
Normal PC vendors saw a net 2% drop (much like Apple if you only count PCs)
Therefore you can say normal PC vendors saw substitution of netbook sales for notebook sales. Apple saw no substitution (either within its own sales or for other PC vendors) and saw additional growth in the smartphone category.

Conclusion: Apple is doing very well compared to other vendors, and still reasonably well compared to past history.


RE: Something does not add up
By omnicronx on 5/15/2009 8:38:19 AM , Rating: 2
I don't think you read either post... The original reply was asking why he mentioned Apple, and I described why. I went on to say that Apples numbers are most likely correct.(thus the drop in notebook sales must be from the PC side). That being said he still had a valid question.

And why you took this so offtopic I am not sure. Apple is NOT doing good in the notebook sector compared to previous years. Compared to other vendors yes, but when was the last time they had a negative growth in notebook sales? Been a few years at least. How their other products are doing is beyond the scope of this argument.


RE: Something does not add up
By segerstein on 5/15/2009 4:11:36 PM , Rating: 2
sales != shipments


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