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Consumers can download the Release Candidate build of Microsoft's slick new OS, Windows 7, and try it out for themselves. Both 32- and 64-bit versions are available for download.
Consumers can finally get their hands on a near-release copy of the latest version of Windows

Windows 7 has the tech community and the consumer world buzzing.  For consumers, it has been a long four months since the release of the Windows 7 beta which saw hundreds of thousands of downloads.  Some turned to torrents to try to swipe the newer beta builds or the recent Release Candidate, but for most it was a matter of waiting.

The waiting is over at last as Microsoft has officially released the Release Candidate 1 build of Windows 7 to the general public.  The build is available directly from Microsoft for download.

Microsoft is suggesting that novice users not download the build as no tech support will be provided.  Customers who download the build will have to burn the ISO onto a disk.  Unlike the more recent beta candidate builds, the RC1 build requires a complete reinstall, even on machines with a working build of Windows 7.

Both 32- and 64-bit versions of the build are available.  Microsoft recommends users' computers have at least 1GHz processor, 1GB of RAM and 16GB of free disk space.

Microsoft is promising not to limit the number of downloads of the new release, like it initially did for the beta release (before later relenting and allowing unlimited downloads).  The beta release proved a headache for some, as the large demand crashed some of Microsoft's servers at the time, rendering many eager users unable to download the beta from Microsoft.  Microsoft is hoping that this time around things go more smoothly.

The test builds of Windows 7 will work until June 2010, but starting in March 2010 they will shut down every two hours.

Microsoft has publicly stated that Windows 7 will launch "no later than January 2010."  However, it now appears that the new OS will land in time for the holiday season, as Acer has leaked its release date as October 23.



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RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By FITCamaro on 5/5/2009 9:49:00 AM , Rating: 0
So it only takes up 7GB? Not 16GB?


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By xti on 5/5/2009 10:15:43 AM , Rating: 3
is 7gb too much? 1TB is under 100 bucks now a days.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By FITCamaro on 5/5/2009 10:18:56 AM , Rating: 1
No 7GB is great. 16GB is huge though. I mean Vista is already big.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By Slinger2112 on 5/5/2009 10:44:14 AM , Rating: 2
Also remember that this is the 'Ultimate' edition... This is theoretically the 'big boy' of the line.

For reference, check the DailyTech article on Windows 7 editions (http://www.dailytech.com/Updated+Windows+7+Edition... ).

The footprint should be much smaller for the OEM Starter edition ... which should make Netbook owners pleased. The lowest retail edition, Home Premium, will probably still require the lion's share of Ultimate's footprint... however any computer modern enough to be loading Windows 7 on should have sufficient HDD space.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By Sulphademus on 5/5/2009 2:48:27 PM , Rating: 3
I believe the way Microsoft was going to do it was to ship all the Windows 7 discs will all the versions on it and what features you get are dependent on the lisence key you enter. I had read that they wanted seamless upgrading from one version to another and this would enable that.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By docmilo on 5/6/2009 2:29:03 AM , Rating: 3
Yes, all disks will have all versions, it doesn't mean that all installs will be the same. Win7 x64 is a 3+ gig download whereas Win7 32bit was less than 3gb. The more goods you want means larger footprint. Take features away and you hd has more empty space.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By FITCamaro on 5/5/2009 4:59:41 PM , Rating: 3
Apparently those who hate me don't limit their stupidity to my more political posts.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By bighairycamel on 5/5/2009 5:33:56 PM , Rating: 2
Haha, I was thinking the same thing since Microsoft's download page gives the following requirements...

1 GHz or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
1 GB RAM (32-bit) / 2 GB RAM (64-bit)
16 GB available disk space (32-bit) / 20 GB (64-bit)
DirectX 9 graphics processor with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver

7 is much better than 16 even though space is a non-issue for the general public.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By teldar on 5/5/2009 6:05:12 PM , Rating: 5
Hell, there are people out there who don't realize there's a difference between hard drive and ram space.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By retrospooty on 5/6/2009 7:21:49 AM , Rating: 2
"Apparently those who hate me don't limit their stupidity to my more political posts. "

No, you posted negatively about Vista... an instant downrate on this site. I can't figure out why, but if you post anything negative about vista, even something mildly observational and non-critical like you just did its pretty much automatic that you'll be at -1.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By xti on 5/6/2009 11:08:04 AM , Rating: 2
or you could just not cry about 16 GB. That's like...smaller than a football game in HD.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By Googer on 5/5/2009 6:54:37 PM , Rating: 2
Storage is cheap, an 8GB flash card costs only a couple of dollars. Hard drives are even cheaper, 300GB HDD should cost you about the same a a PS3 game.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By omnicronx on 5/5/2009 10:23:07 AM , Rating: 2
Makes sense, around a 3GB initial footprint with another 3-4 gigs reserved for paging and hibernate files.

Personally I disable paging completely, the average user will probably never need it with 4GB, and personally I have 8GB of RAM, and I have never even come close to the limit, even with some intense video editing. ok.. intense amature video editing ;)


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By FITCamaro on 5/5/2009 10:37:48 AM , Rating: 2
We don't need to know about you editing your home movies with your boyfriend.

jk man. :)


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By Lord 666 on 5/5/2009 10:58:36 AM , Rating: 4
Speaking of pink shirt designer jean wearing metrosexuals, haven't seen mdogs on here for a while.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By FITCamaro on 5/5/2009 11:39:53 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah I don't know whats up with him. I'll ask him tonight.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By omnicronx on 5/5/2009 11:42:31 AM , Rating: 5
Hey A**hole! I'm Canadian, how do you know we are not married?


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By siberus on 5/5/09, Rating: 0
RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By Smilin on 5/5/2009 10:58:01 AM , Rating: 3
Turning off your pagefile is a bad idea regardless of how much RAM you have. Saying you'll "never need it" shows a lack of understanding of how windows memory management works.

You are essentially forcing your computer to consume usable RAM for memory allocations that are never actually used.

Foolishness.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By bighairycamel on 5/5/2009 11:42:47 AM , Rating: 1
Not to mention there are no noticable performance benefits aside from saving a few gigs of HD space.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By omnicronx on 5/5/2009 12:35:36 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Saying you'll "never need it" shows a lack of understanding of how windows memory management works.

Ok, I don't actually totally disable it (I find you need 512M, mainly because some older programs require a page file, and for a few reasons I will mention below), but its damn close. Unlike XP which indiscriminately used whatever memory was available, whether it be paged or not (resulting in thrashing) Vista/7 specifically tries to load as much into the system memory as possible in the first place. The only reason Microsoft recommends to at least match the amount of physical RAM is because it is required to do a full memory dump. I've never done this in a home environment in my life, and I still have enough virtual mem to perform a mini dump, or capture blue screen errors.

I've also heard claims that it helps with managing the loading and unloading of applications, but I have yet to see a negative impact with only 512M RAM.(as I will mention below it is quite the opposite). That being said, your most commonly used programs are already in system memory because of superfetch, pretty much rendering your point about 'forcing your to consume usable RAM for memory allocations' moot as this is already default behavior.

By definition paged memory cannot be as fast as system memory, there will be a negative impact on your system anytime virtual mem is used as a subsitute for system memory. There is no getting around this, and while Vista/7 tries its best not to do so, I found that it would do so anyways on a regular basis. Although not nearly as bad as XP.

There is no doubt in my mind that going to the minimum page definitely speeds up my system, and while I would never attempt this at work, there is no reason to have a full fledged page file with 8GB of RAM at home.

P.S In the unlikely event Windows somehow does run out of memory with 4GB+ of RAM, Vista+ has a feature (which interesting enough is called RADAR or Resource Exhaustion Detector and Resolution) which will shut down the program using the most resources, so the days of XP where your system would become completely unresponsive are gone.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By ChronoReverse on 5/5/2009 1:17:18 PM , Rating: 2
All your memory in any modern operating system is using "virtual memory". Virtual memory is NOT the same thing as the page file.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By omnicronx on 5/5/2009 1:41:40 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Virtual memory is NOT the same thing as the page file.
They are directly tied to one another, using virtual memory implies that the page file is being used. Notice how they say increase the virtual memory and not the page file size in the text below.
quote:
If your computer lacks the random access memory (RAM) needed to run a program or operation, Windows uses virtual memory to compensate. Virtual memory combines your computer’s RAM with temporary space on your hard disk. When RAM runs low, virtual memory moves data from RAM to a space called a paging file. Moving data to and from the paging file frees up RAM to complete its work. The more RAM your computer has, the faster your programs will generally run. If a lack of RAM is slowing your computer, you might be tempted to increase virtual memory to compensate . However, your computer can read data from RAM much more quickly than from a hard disk, so adding RAM is a better solution.
http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/hel...

*also notice the 'Applies to all editions of Windows Vista.' displayed at the top.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By TomZ on 5/5/2009 1:50:57 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
They are directly tied to one another, using virtual memory implies that the page file is being used
Not necessarily. You could have a virtual memory system that doesn't use a disk page file. I would guess that this is exactly how Windows operates when you completely disable the page file.

Also, the OP is right - Windows always uses virtual memory. For example, as an application increases its memory requirements, Windows will map more and more memory into that process' memory space.

The quote you gave is really for non-tech end users; it is a simplified and not totally accurate description.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By omnicronx on 5/5/2009 2:05:32 PM , Rating: 2
Wow.. My interpretation was so wrong its not even funny.. Kind of sad considering what I do..

http://blogs.technet.com/markrussinovich/archive/2...

I may need to disappear for a while!


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By omnicronx on 5/5/2009 2:14:56 PM , Rating: 2
Although my previous point still stands.. just replace virtual memory with paged..


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By GaryJohnson on 5/5/2009 3:17:12 PM , Rating: 2
In the years since I turned it off I've never needed it and after I turned it off I saw a performance improvement... clearly I'm a moron.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By TomZ on 5/5/2009 4:05:57 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Turning off your pagefile is a bad idea regardless of how much RAM you have. Saying you'll "never need it" shows a lack of understanding of how windows memory management works.
Not really. You will only run into problems if your current memory usage requirements exceed your available physical memory. If you have, e.g., 4GB of RAM and just run a handful of non-memory-intensive apps, you'll be just fine.

I've run machines for long periods of time like that and didn't run into any problems. But on the other hand, I never noticed any performance difference, so when I reloaded the OS again, I never bothered with that.
quote:
You are essentially forcing your computer to consume usable RAM for memory allocations that are never actually used.
What does that even mean? Memory is only allocated in the first place when a program requests it. So, by definition, if the memory is being used, then it is needed!
quote:
Foolishness.
The foolishness is that your post somehow got rated to a 5. I can't really explain that.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By GaryJohnson on 5/5/2009 4:35:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You will only run into problems if your current memory usage requirements exceed your available physical memory.


If that was the way it worked in practice that would be great, but in XP there is a lot of hard drive activity (thrashing) with the page file on as opposed to off even before it's used all your available physical memory.


RE: Windows 7 on dv9207us
By omnicronx on 5/5/2009 4:51:51 PM , Rating: 2
It does work that way in practice. I think you are confused here, Tomz was describing what happens when paging is turned off completely. You are describing a situation in which it is on.


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