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Each branch of the U.S. military continues to try and see how it can embrace Web 2.0

The Pentagon is now using Web 2.0 services such as Facebook and Twitter to help relay the military's message while also tracking down possible recruits online.

"They live in the virtual world," Lt. Gen Benjamin Freakley recently said during an interview with the Associated Press.  "You could friend your recruiter, and then he could talk to your friends."

At a time when some Americans don't believe mass media in the United States is portraying the correct message about the mission in Iraq, officials such as Gen Raymond Odierno, top U.S. commander in Iraq, have a Facebook page used to highlight things soldiers are doing in the Middle East.

The U.S. Air Force currently has an official Twitter account -- with more than 3,300 followers -- it uses to share information about activities of the Air Force.  An official Facebook Air Force page has also been created, used to help share experiences and information of Airman deployed overseas.

The Marine Corps has dabbled with Web 2.0 experimentation, although it mainly has been for recruiting only.  Both the Navy and Coast Guard are experimenting how to work in the Web 2.0 world, with even the Coast Guard commandant updating his Facebook status while he travels.

The Army, along with its online presence, even opened up a gaming center in the Franklin Mills Mall in Philadelphia to help attract new recruits.  The Army Experience Center is a 14,500-square-foot location that has PCs, game consoles, and a virtual simulation machine.

As more possible recruits head online into the virtual world, expect each branch of the U.S. military to mimic their moves.  

Some companies and organizations have been wary to launch official Web 2.0 services, though allowing select executives and employees to handle work-related business online.  It's not uncommon to find both employees and executives from companies such as Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, and others sharing information online.



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Daily Grammar Technicalities
By jHub on 5/3/2009 7:23:12 PM , Rating: 2
In the penultimate sentence of this article, I think you meant that "Some companies and organizations have been [wary] to launch official Web 2.0 services," which would suggest that they are cautious or circumspect about web 2.0. That's what wary means -- prudent or careful, as in beware, awareness, etc.

The way it is currently worded would suggest that the companies and organizations had tried Web 2.0 services and grown tired of them. That's what weary means -- fatigued or exhausted, as in weary traveler or weary dogs, etc.

The former option is most certainly what you meant to write, as the latter (the way it's written in the article) only serves to contradict the point the article is making -- that the Pentagon is trying something new.

Did your editors go to the same technical schools you did? You should find ones that took more liberal arts classes.




RE: Daily Grammar Technicalities
By werepossum on 5/3/09, Rating: -1
RE: Daily Grammar Technicalities
By PrinceGaz on 5/3/2009 9:52:43 PM , Rating: 1
You're probably flogging a dead horse when suggesting the DT article publishers use correct spelling and/or grammar. In particular, the weary/wary error has occurred numerous times. It doesn't matter how you word your reply, they'll make the same mistake again the next time what they actually meant was "wary".

I must admit I'm growing increasingly wary of coming here from reading numerous reports on DT which are riddled with spelling or gramatical errors (often from being badly copy and pasted). And increasingly weary of them as well, as you need to work out what the article poster intended to say, when reading the messed up stuff some of them sent.


By PrinceGaz on 5/3/2009 9:55:22 PM , Rating: 2
Yes, I know there is a grammatical error in my first sentence there, upon re-reading it. But unlike the people who post articles on DT, I cannot correct those errors when I notice them a minute or two later.


"We are going to continue to work with them to make sure they understand the reality of the Internet.  A lot of these people don't have Ph.Ds, and they don't have a degree in computer science." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis

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