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Acer's Aspire One remains a netbook leader, and a strong seller worldwide. Analysts say Acer's netbook sales growth could help it eventually pass Dell for the number 1 PC retailer spot.  (Source: techshout.com)
Analysts say Acer beating Dell is possible, but not likely

The poor global economy continues to pound computer makers of all sizes. Netbooks continue to be popular, yet despite the increase sales of netbook systems most computer makers are still seeing revenues drop and having a hard time meeting analyst expectations.

InformationWeek reports that despite the poor economy and the reduction in computers being built and shipped, Acer could replace Dell as the world's number two PC maker this year. Dell only recently lost the title of number one PC seller in the world to HP.

Despite the chance Acer has of deposing Dell, Acer turned in disappointing numbers for its most recent quarter. The company lowered its 2009 projections for netbooks shipped to between 10 million to 12 million, a reduction from the previous expectation of 12 million to 15 million.

Acer profits for the quarter dropped 31% to $60 million, analysts expected Acer to report profits of $64 million. Total Acer revenue for the quarter fell 6.5% to $3.5 billion, down from $3.8 billion. Taking the number two crown form Dell could prove to be difficult. For Acer to take the second spot from Dell, Dell would have to post another consecutive loss in market share while Acer would need to gain. Dell has seen shipments fall for two quarters in a row.

Analyst Doug Bell from IDC said, "Hypothetically, if Acer grows like they say they are, then it's possible there could be a change in the No. 2 vendor." In Q1 2009 the numbers for Dell and Acer were in a bit of debate. IDC reported that Dell shipped 1.1 million more computers during the quarter than Acer shipped. However, research firm Gartner has the two computer makers in a near tie with Dell ahead of Acer by a meager 1/10 of a percentage.

Bell says with regards to Acer dethroning Dell for the second spot, "Over a million units is a lot of share to take from a stable, mature player. It is possible, but it would be very tough."


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Acer parts are very high quality
By TA152H on 5/2/2009 9:51:49 PM , Rating: 1
I don't know where the buffoons who are posting how Acer is crap are getting their (mis)information from. Especially compared to Dell.

How did Dell become known for quality? They are known by virtually everyone in the "know" for being low quality, sometimes non-standard computers for the fools who know nothing about computers. No one I know would even consider a Dell, and I go through great pains to tell people to avoid them.

Acer is the same company that makes Aopen motherboards and other components. Aopen has been known for being high quality almost forever, although, I've had nightmares with their support, I do have to admit that. But the quality of their motherboards is superb, and the other components of theirs I've used have been equally good. Dell? You must be kidding me. Everytime I have to open up this %#$#boxes for a friend to work on them, I want to break glass they are such complete and utter dung.

That they are in danger of falling into a death spiral pleases me no end. A company that sells computers should be a technology company, not a packaging company, and for too long Dell prided themselves on their low cost of distribution. They were INCREDIBLY stupid to betray Intel and start using AMD processors, when the Conroe was right around the corner. If they were going to do it, do it WAY earlier, or don't do it at all. But, nope, they sure showed Intel who was boss. Have you noticed that their market share hasn't been quite so good since then? Maybe by giving up exclusivity they lost some incentives from Intel? OK, definitely. Now they're just like everyone else, except Apple, who is exclusively Intel and no doubt gets some love from them.

Good job, Michael. You got to use K8s for a few quarters when they were better then the Pentium 4, and now you lost your special relationship with Intel possibly forever. Oh, and your market share! Good job!




RE: Acer parts are very high quality
By omnicronx on 5/3/2009 1:24:06 AM , Rating: 2
Haha funny post, especially the misinformation part..
quote:
Aopen has been known for being high quality almost forever,
Um.. no they havn't and Aopen is part of the low end budget market, so why you bring in that comparison I don't know.
quote:
Dell? You must be kidding me. Everytime I have to open up this %#$#boxes for a friend to work on them, I want to break glass they are such complete and utter dung.
If you actually read our posts, we were talking about laptops, and not desktops. Furthermore as other posters have noted, Dell has really improved over the years. They no longer use proprietary parts (for the most part) and it seems they have left the ultra budget market completely.

And finally your little rant about Dell is moronic. What Dell and Intel were doing was illegal. I find funny you call us 'misinformed' considering this very topic will probably be the centerpiece of the anti-trust case vs Intel.

There is nothing wrong with Acer products, but with laptops, support is the deal breaker to me, and Acer just does not cut it compared to other manufacturers.


By TA152H on 5/3/2009 3:37:34 AM , Rating: 3
I've opened up new Dells, I see no improvement in quality. They are complete crap. You must not know the difference.

Aopen is a very reliable part. I don't know anyone informed who considers them poor quality. I don't use them much anymore because I am really annoyed with their support, but Dell is horrific in that department too. Supermicro is probably the best quality followed by Intel, considering the support you get. Intel is BY FAR the best supported motherboard, but sometimes the products they come out with lack features. Gigabyte seems to be a very good enthusiast motherboard, but I have only started using them and can't say much about reliability yet. I don't think any are better than Supermicro though, although their support is only mediocre.

The fact you have to qualify that Dell uses less proprietary parts proves my point. They used special memory on new machines, or so they said. I couldn't convince our company to try regular ones. I mean, I know Dell is complete garbage, but even they wouldn't use proprietary memory, would they? Nothing surprises me with them though. Just make sure you wear gloves when you open their flimsy, ugly as Hell, sharp edged cases. It's like playing with razor blades.

Actually, you're complete uninformed if you think it was illegal, since Apple is doing it now. There are many legal ways to have special relationships, and your whole implication shows how little you understand. Are you implying Dell went to AMD because Intel wanted them to, to avoid legal issues? Oh, yes, that must be true. They went to them because they felt AMD had the right product, and their customers wanted Opteron based servers, mainly. They lost preferential treatment for it, and now have spiraled.

I agree with you about support. I had nothing but trouble with Aopen support, although Dell is pitiful too. They are always getting a black eye for support, unless you understand Hindi. HP is probably the best of the three, and, not too surprisingly, now dominate Dell.

I don't think Dell is in a death spiral yet, but let's hope they fall into it, and we're done with that practice of just being a distributor. Computer companies should be technology companies, or at least not proudly boast they are not. It's shameful. It also doesn't work now that they have prostituted themselves to AMD. When they were a distributor of Intel technology, they did well. Now, they are not. I thought at the time it was a bad move, no one with any brains thought AMD could compete with Intel in the long term, especially when Intel always had a better processor but stubbornly refused to use it on desktops.

But here's my real question. Why didn't Dell adopt the K8 much sooner? Why wait until the Conroe was not far from release? I mean, they knew the Pentium M was already better than the K8, and they knew the Conroe was based on it. Do it early, or not at all. It was a huge mistake. I was dumbfounded when it happened. The timing was terrible.

Dell quality? Good grief. I've heard everything now.


By mindless1 on 5/3/2009 11:34:44 PM , Rating: 2
AOpen was one of the better quality mainboards around the turn of the century. They lost some popularity due to pedestrian features and being undercut on the low end by the likes of PCChips/ECS, and being outdone on the higher end by Abit, Asus, Gigabyte. It basically signifies two extremes, the people buying cheap and the enthusiasts willing to pay for particular things because they know more about tech.

Dell on the other hand has had solid offerings which were often containing OEM versions of Intel retail boards. Pity they, like most, used a pathetically defeatured bios but I can understand their reasons in trying to cut support costs. THeir move with rewiring a standard ATX PSU then using the same 20 pin connector was inexcusable but they were high quality PSUs, miles better than what you would've gotten for a similar price-point at a local mom-n-pop computer shop.

Whether or not what Dell and Intel did was illegal, it is what it is which still gave customers the chance to decide for themselves what to buy, the cost difference wasn't THAT much, PCs cost more a few years ago so the numerical cost difference had to be seen in the perspective of % of total cost.

I do think Dell support for laptops is better than Acer, but then again if it never breaks what do you need the support for?


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