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2010 Toyota Prius

2010 Honda Insight
Base Prius gets a $1,000 price cut

The most popular hybrid car on the market is the Toyota Prius. The Prius has been around for a decade now and Toyota is getting set to launch a new and larger Prius for 2010 that offers an increased feature set and better fuel economy. One early road test showed that the 2010 Prius achieved 52.5 mpg.

Toyota is going to be pricing the third-generation 2010 Prius to better compete with Honda's new Insight hybrid. The Insight carries a base MSRP of $19,800, undercutting the 2009 Prius selling for a base MSRP of $22,000. However, the 2010 Prius I will carry an MSRP of $21,000 which helps to close the gap between the two hybrids. The 2010 Prius will be offered in five trim levels with the II, III, IV, and V coming in at $22,000, $23,000, $25,800, and $27,720 respectively.

Bob Carter, group vice president and general manager of the Toyota Division, expects the $22,000 Prius II to be the most popular model for consumers. “This model provides more than $2,000 added value, including the features most buyers want, at the same price as the current base model,” said Carter.

Standalone options will include an $1,800 Navigation Package, $3,600 Solar Roof Package (includes Navigation Package), and a $4,500 Advanced Technology Package (Navigation Package plus Radar Cruise Control, Pre-Collision System, Lane Keep Assist, and Intelligent Parking Assist).

The Insight is rated at 41mpg combined for city and highway driving, while the larger new Prius is rated at 50 mpg combined and is classified as a mid-size car offering more space than the Honda.

The economy is hurting sales of all vehicles, including the Prius and other hybrid automobiles. Through Q1 of 2009, the Prius sold 24,277 units, a 43% drop from the same quarter last year. The Insight hit the market in March and sold 569 since then.



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RE: Stop hybrid dumping!
By mmntech on 4/21/2009 5:39:51 PM , Rating: 0
Confusing Japan with The People's Republic of China: FAIL. You sound just like Buzz Hargrove, the racist ex-president of the Canadian Autoworkers Union.

As for the hybrids, they are improving but there are still have some issues with them that would prevent me from buying them. Cost is down but maintenance in the long run is still expensive. I see an awful lot of Priuses (or is it Prii?) on the used lots. The packs themselves are a couple grand at least, plus taxes and disposal fees. I'm not sure how long they last but I had pegged it at around four years with average driving. That's assuming the pack goes for one complete cycle per day and you drive everyday. 1500 cycles is vary good for a battery like that. I suspect the battery replacement costs scare a lot of people away. Secondly, they're still relatively underpowered compared to other cars in their size range. They just don't have the punch needed for highway driving.


RE: Stop hybrid dumping!
By Alexstarfire on 4/21/2009 10:42:21 PM , Rating: 2
With an 8 year warranty, 10 years in California, I'd say at least 8 years. The battery in my 2002 worked just perfectly up until it got totaled a couple weeks back. And the battery wasn't even taken car of like it should have been. I was not aware at the time that the car should be used at least once every two weeks so the battery doesn't drain too much. My car was sitting in a garage for 2 years with no use. As such if my battery went through that kind of crap and was still fine that short of some defect that all hybrid batteries should be fine for many many years.

And what kind of power do you need to drive on the highway? Even in my old 2002 Prius there was still more than enough power to drive on the highway. Of course I don't have to floor it to accelerate around people or go 100+ MPH the whole time. If you seriously need more power to drive on the highway then I suggest to learn to drive again.


RE: Stop hybrid dumping!
By mindless1 on 4/22/09, Rating: 0
RE: Stop hybrid dumping!
By Alexstarfire on 4/22/2009 1:59:36 AM , Rating: 2
I never said it was pristine condition over here buddy. I guess you don't really know anything about hybrid batteries though else you'd know that leaving it sitting in a garage for 2 years is worse than using it.

1. Of course, I never said you wouldn't, but many people like to point out that you're going to have to replace it fairly regularly which is just false information. If you have to replace it every 10+ years then it's not really a big deal. Most people don't even keep cars that long anyway. On the other hand there hasn't been a massive surge of people replacing batteries even on the old 1997 model Priuses, the ones only sold in Japan. But hey, if you want to talk about just the US then even the 2000 models have their batteries still working just fine.

And BTW, by "just fine" I mean working as normal.

2. As said before, you obviously know nothing of hybrid batteries. You can go read up on the many stories of cabs going 300,000+ miles on the batteries and they are still working. That is double the warranty mileage even in California.

If you'd like some to do some research on hybrid batteries before you decide to just post trash please go check out PriusChat.com/forums or www.cleanmpg.com.

Your information is about as bad as CNW's "Dust to Dust" report stating that a Hummer was greener than a Prius.


RE: Stop hybrid dumping!
By mindless1 on 4/23/2009 1:03:54 AM , Rating: 2
Pretty crazy for you to try to equate my mention of your lack of evidence as equating to some other person's claim a Hummer is as green.

It is scientific fact that batteries degrade with time and use. Did I write that every single owner will have theirs fail prematurely or anything like that? No.

Instead what I wrote was your observation does not support your conclusion, and further we can't assume battery life for others will be ok because your car happened to be totalled before it needed a new battery.

Please focus on details, when talking about a period of time then switching to yet another factor like 300,000 miles INSTEAD of that period of time and what the capacity will be after that period, you yet again ignore the very real world truth about the eventual cost of battery replacement.

How about you instead go learn a bit about batteries, they are not magic. The technology is bound by the limitations of the components used within it. The battery manufacturers themselves specify these things so if you are trying to claim they are lying, you might want real scientific evidence to counter with because it is not likely the manufacturers themselves will lie about their product being worse in lifespan vs capacity than it really is.


RE: Stop hybrid dumping!
By Alexstarfire on 4/23/2009 2:11:41 PM , Rating: 1
I'm sure I probably know far more than you about these batteries, but that isn't the point. As I mentioned before THERE IS NO FUCKING EVIDENCE YET. Most of the batteries aren't even outside the warranty period yet. I went with the mileage because that's the best there is to compare it to.

And I don't know why you keep saying over and over again that batteries degrade over time.... that's so damn basic. Everyone knows, or should at least, know that. But the fact that you keep stating this tells me only one thing.... you have no idea how a hybrid uses the battery. It never uses the full charge, something between like 10% to 20% at most. I don't quite remember the specifics of the Prius but IIRC it trys to keep the charge between like 60% and 80%. Over time it won't be able to. I can't say for certain, but I see no reason why the car can't adjust this value based on the max charge the battery can hold. It have to guess it, but it shouldn't be too difficult. Since a hybrid will NEVER use the full charge of the battery it can conceivably work perfectly fine for far more than a decade. Considering what a hybrid is supposed to do there is really no reason for the car to stop functioning properly until the battery can't hold a charge period... and that's going to be a LONG way down the road.

But hey... show me some proof that these batteries are going to have to be replaced every 8 years, or 10 in California, when the warranty ends then I can shut my trap. But I already know there isn't any evidence either way and all the circumstantial evidence points to the batteries being able to last well outside their warranty period.

And also, there have been some reports that a whole battery may not need to be replaced but the individual cells that have failed. I think this is more referring to problems when a battery just dies because of some defect. I presume the same could be done with a battery going dead as I'm sure the wear isn't going to be perfectly even across the cells. Of course the people at Toyota may have some system that keeps the wear even. It'd be smart if they did.


RE: Stop hybrid dumping!
By usbseawolf2000 on 4/26/2009 4:11:56 AM , Rating: 2
mindless1,

1) Prius' HV battery end of life is when it can only retain 80% of it's original capacity. The pack does not drop dead but you can continue to continue driving by all means.

2) Replacing HV battery pack is not as expensive as you think. Once it is out of the warranty, the pack itself cost less than $2k. It should cost much less 10 years later (once warranty expired). The old pack has $200 bounty fee because Toyota will pay you to get back the Nickel to recycle, which is worth more than that.

HV battery pack is cheaper than an automatic transmission in the non-hybrid car and AT's warranty is about 1/3 of HV pack's warranty. AT do wear out with many moving parts and much shorter warranty. HV battery pack is maintenance free with no moving parts. Your attention should be focused on non-hybrid AT rather than in the Prius HV pack.


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