backtop


Print 34 comment(s) - last by MrCoyote.. on Apr 3 at 8:03 PM


Recording to Holographic Media

Reading from Holographic Media
InPhase has packed 515Gb in a square inch of holographic media and plans 300GB drives and media later this year

A story on Physorg.com is reporting that InPhase Technologies, a company focused on holographic storage, has produced a medium capable of holding 515Gb of data per square inch which overshadows the capacity of the highest density magnetic platters currently in production. InPhase was a big hit at this year's CES when they demonstrated its holographic storage prototypes and showed off the various media options but said that initial products will only use the red laser, as opposed to blue and green, for reasons of cost.

Holographic storage has been a topic of strong conversation in the storage community for a few years now since the need for alternative recording methods has become more apparent. Magnetic recording methods are approaching their physical limits because of the superparamagnetism phenomenon. Superparamagnetism occurs when the magnetic bits of data on magnetic media, such as hard disk drives, are placed so close together that they disrupt each others' "on/off" state, corrupting the data and making the media unreadable.

To buy some time, a new method of magnetic recording has been introduced in the last few years which is known as perpendicular magnetic recording, or PMR. Using PMR heads, bits are written perpendicular to the hard disk platter rather than laying them down parallel or horizontally. This method ultimately conserves surface area and effectively increases the storage density without the occurrence of superparamagnetism. However, there is a limit to this method as well.

This is where holographic storage comes in with the ability to store more than a terabyte of data on a single piece of media. Holographic media can be manufactured in various shapes, sizes, and thickness. This non-standard approach is possible because of the way data can be written to it. According to Physorg.com:

Densities in holography are achieved by different factors than magnetic storage. Density depends on the number of pixels/bits in a page of data; the number of pages that are stored in a particular volumetric location; the dynamic range of the recording material; the thickness of the material, and the wavelength of the recording laser.

The first product will most likely be a 300GB disk with a transfer rate of 20MB/sec however the second wave of holographic media will range from 800GB to 1.6TB capacities. Currently, to achieve 1.6TB of capacity we would need 4x400GB hard disk drives in a RAID 0 array which does not come cheap. Pricing on the holographic storage medium has not been announced but since it is a new technology, we can expect prices to be expensive.


Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Why the slow transfer rate?
By AppaYipYip on 3/27/2006 6:56:23 PM , Rating: 2
I'm curious why the transfer rate is so slow? 20MB/sec? No thanks....




RE: Why the slow transfer rate?
By SoylentG on 3/27/2006 9:25:25 PM , Rating: 2
20MB/sec is fantastic, given the total capacity...Don't CDs burn around 7-8MB/sec?


RE: Why the slow transfer rate?
By Alaa on 3/28/2006 2:32:30 AM , Rating: 2
maybe its better to use them as removable drives as they r faster than CD/DVD?


RE: Why the slow transfer rate?
By Wwhat on 3/27/06, Rating: 0
RE: Why the slow transfer rate?
By BrownTown on 3/28/2006 1:14:01 AM , Rating: 5
wow, you people are being pretty harsh, whenenver a new technology comes out it isn't immediatly economically viable at first. The fact that a new technology is even close to the same place as magnetic media is amazing given the decades of advances and billions of dollars poured into the magnetic media industry. Give this new tech some time and it has a good chance of becoming economically viable. I know this is something that people have been talking about for awhile now, but that how new tech works, someone write a theoreticall piece on how to improve something, then others do research, money gets invested by companies, and after many many years a new technology might develop. I remember when DVD players were crazy expensive and only for the rich, but as the technology catches on it becomes cheaper. Of course now you can go in WallMArt and get a 30$ DVD player, the same will be true for this new technology in a few years. So nobodys forcing you to buy one now, but you should recognize the potential here.


"Intel is investing heavily (think gazillions of dollars and bazillions of engineering man hours) in resources to create an Intel host controllers spec in order to speed time to market of the USB 3.0 technology." -- Intel blogger Nick Knupffer

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki