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Declining to follow the price cut plan

DailyTech revealed last week ATI's new pricing strategy to compete with NVIDIA's GTS 250 rebrand, also known as the 9800 GTX+.

The ATI Radeon HD 4850 512MB was to drop to $129, while the Radeon HD 4870 512MB was scheduled to be cut to $149. This was supposed to be accomplished primarily through the use of mail-in rebates, which ATI would help offset.

Most of the board partners took up the offer on the 4850. However, due to several factors converging at once, the 4850 can now be picked up for around $120 at several e-tailers, albeit with the mail-in rebate.

The story with the 4870 is something else entirely. The Radeon HD 4870 512MB was supposed to drop to $149 with a mail-in rebate, but some of ATI's graphics card partners are resisting this as they feel that since the card outperforms the GTX 260, it should compete against that card. They instead are positioning the 1GB version of the 4850 against the 1GB version of the GTS 250 at the $149 price point.

One of our sources in Taiwan told us: "The ATI lineup is very strong, and we feel the 4850 should go against the GTS 250 and the 4870 against the GTX 260".

ATI has been very aggressive with its pricing, with lower prices and higher performance in the same segments as its nemesis NVIDIA. This has led to declining revenues for board manufacturers, already hard hit by lower demand due to the global recession.


 

 

GTX 280

ATI Radeon 4870

GTX 260 Core 216

ATI Radeon HD 4850

GTS 250

Stream Processors

240

800

216

800

128

Texture Address / Filtering

80 / 80

40

72/72

40

64 / 64

ROPs

32

16

28

16

16

Core Clock

602MHz

750MHz

576MHz

625MHz

738MHz

Memory Clock

1107MHz

900MHz GDDR5 (3600MHz eff)

999MHz

993MHz GDDR3 (1986MHz eff)

1100MHz

Memory Bus Width

512-bit

256-bit

448-bit

256-bit

256-bit

Frame Buffer

1GB

512MB

896MB

512MB

512MB

Transistor Count

1.4B

956M

1.4B

956M

754M

Price Point

$349

$149

$199

$129

$129



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RE: Huh?
By SiliconDoc on 3/13/2009 1:00:26 PM , Rating: -1
Umm... gee red rooster... the 4830 came out with the SAME SIZE SILICON DIE the 4870 and 4850 use, at HUNDREDS of dollars less than the the 4870, once in encased on the card....
Do you people EVER THINK for yourselves ?
Now you explain this one to me, and the other brain dead zombies buying every corporate BS line ever devised for fanboi noobs who think they've got knowledge...
How does a 4870 cost $300 and the 4830 cost $90, when the same "life saving foward looking highly new technology super many per wafer" chip resides on both of them ?
LOL
Yes, the general commenting public - our immense chattles "brains" behind their computers... they tell us EXACTLY WHY the corporate elite have gotten away with so much... the tiny little know it alls never think one single thing their masters haven't told them to - then they bleat and repeat - and get their little red commie brain star...
Good golly.
SAME CORE - answer the question !


RE: Huh?
By GodisanAtheist on 3/13/2009 2:01:24 PM , Rating: 2
Because the corporate heads saw a hole in their line-up and realized they could make more money selling crippled 4870 cores in a lower bracket than they could sell fully functional cores at full price?

Just because its the same die with fewer SPs doesn't mean it was a yield problem, they could intentionally be crippling cores. If I'm not mistaken that's exactly what AMD was doing with the Phenom II x4's as x3's a little while ago (not even burning off parts of the chip there).

All ATI R7xx cards are actually made with 900 SPs, but only 800 are ever activated when the card is shipped out. The processor is built with huge amounts of redundancy, so it ultimately doesn't matter if they get a core with 890 sp's or 810 sp's, cause only 800 are ever actually going to be activated. As you can imagine this works wonders for yields...


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer














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