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Samsung Q1EX Front

Samsung Q1EX Profile  (Source: Samsung)
Samsung's Q1 Ultra followup sheds real keyboard for the virtual

The UMPC form-factor has lost much of its appeal as consumers have become so infatuated with netbook computers. It used to be that if you were looking for a computer with a small screen that was very portable, the UMPC was the only ticket in town.

One of the original UMPCs came from Samsung and was called the Q1 Ultra. Samsung has now introduced a follow up to the Q1 Ultra called the Q1EX-71G. That name is certainly a mouthful, and not as elegant as Q1 Ultra, but the machine itself is very slick.

The Q1EX measure 9-inches x 5-inches x 1-inch (W x H x D) and weighs less than 1.5 pounds. The device sheds its odd split thumb keyboard in favor of an onscreen keyboard and 7-inch touch panel LCD. The panel has a screen resolution of 1024 x 600 and 300 nits of brightness.

Samsung promises that the standard 4-cell lithium-ion battery pack is good for up to 4.5 hours of run time and that the extended life battery is good for up to 8.5 hours. Connectivity options with the system include 802.11b/g and Bluetooth 2.0 is included. An integrated dual-array mic allows users to make VOIP calls using the device as well.

The hardware inside the tiny chassis includes a 60GB HDD, 2GB of DDR2 667 MHz RAM and the processor is a VIA Nano ULV U2500 running at 1.2GHz. The system runs Windows XP Tablet Edition and graphics are VIA Chrome9 HC. Samsung warrantees the Q1EX for 1 year for parts and labor.

The Q1EX is available now online for $775.99, which seems steep considering similarly specked netbooks can be had for half that amount.



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RE: Not the form factor
By afkrotch on 3/5/2009 1:31:47 PM , Rating: 2
I'd say that's definitely the problem. I'd get a UMPC over a netbook if they were the same price. I don't need a keyboard or mouse. I just want the portability and media capabilities.

I hate your PMPs, cause of it's limited list of video formats it supports.


RE: Not the form factor
By Suntan on 3/5/2009 2:37:40 PM , Rating: 1
Yes and no. I have an Archos 504wifi that will play straight DVD rips and anything I convert I just convert to h264 at the native screen res. The archos plays them fine.

The browser could be more full featured, but when traveling above the ocean squashed into an airplane like cattle, I’ll take the convenience and pocketability of the Archos (with integrated kickstand) any day, even compared to my netbook.

-Suntan


RE: Not the form factor
By Jedi2155 on 3/5/2009 11:51:45 PM , Rating: 3
The point is, NOT to convert but to play them in the format you get them in. Converting takes effort and time which having a full featured windows machine removes much of it.


RE: Not the form factor
By Suntan on 3/6/2009 9:26:27 AM , Rating: 2
Suit yourself. As commented elsewhere on this thread, if you’re looking for a pocketable player with more capability (should ship with MPlayer, and VLC shouldn’t be too far behind) get your name on the waiting list for a Pandora.

www.openpandora.org

If you don't need pocketable just get a netbook or a UMPC and solve your problem already. A netbook can play pretty much anything short of Bluray rips.

Personally, for my needs, the Archos works really well. It can play most standard formats. Other than a couple of really old rips I have in .OGM format it plays everything I want to watch. I don’t download really f’ed up video formats, so I don't have issues with that.

My main sources of video for it are DVDs, which it can play straight off but results in less run-time as the larger files require more drive activity; and Digital TV, which is just a matter of pressing the “convert” button in the SageTV menu, then copying all the converted shows to the player when it is time to take a trip.

-Suntan


RE: Not the form factor
By Jedi2155 on 3/6/2009 4:01:24 PM , Rating: 2
Pandora looks pretty good...I'm pretty happy with my Zen Vision:M myself and its doing pretty good considering I've had it over over 3 years and dropped it over a dozen times. Supports most of the formats I need it to as well.

But I carry around my 17" 1920x1200 laptop now to most places I go so I barely even use my MP3 player.


RE: Not the form factor
By cheetah2k on 3/8/2009 9:36:47 PM , Rating: 2
No HSDPA (3G)... Disappointing really. I'm hanging out for the OQO 2+ which will be released in May 09. Expensive as hell, but its got a slideout keyboard, 3G, and all the bells n whistles in a very compact form factor

http://www.oqo.com/


RE: Not the form factor
By mkrech on 3/5/2009 3:01:57 PM , Rating: 2
Check out:
http://www.alwaysinnovating.com/touchbook/

roll your own, keyboard or not.


RE: Not the form factor
By Suntan on 3/5/2009 4:21:36 PM , Rating: 1
No thanks, I prefer x86 compatibility. If I wanted an OMAP based product, I’d get the more portable openpandora.

www.openpandora.org

-Suntan


RE: Not the form factor
By mkrech on 3/5/2009 5:01:29 PM , Rating: 2
I was comparing the Touch Book to the Samsung. In this application what benefit does x86 have over OMAP? It seems that the Touch Book could do everything you would want the Samsung to do at less than half the cost.

Is there something critically important I am missing or just features I may be overlooking that are likely not of any interest to me?

Thanks


RE: Not the form factor
By GaryJohnson on 3/5/2009 8:31:01 PM , Rating: 2
Touchbook isn't shipping, by the time it ships the price of the Samsung could be half of what it is now. (The day after DNF ships probably)


RE: Not the form factor
By Suntan on 3/5/2009 8:39:08 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
In this application what benefit does x86 have over OMAP?


Well, any programs that run on x86 but not on ARM systems. Mostly programs that run on Windows, although there are some linux programs that are not available on ARM setups if I'm not mistaken.

-Suntan


RE: Not the form factor
By n0nsense on 3/6/2009 10:11:17 AM , Rating: 2
In Linux world, every architecture supported.
It is just a matter of building (compiling) your application with right target architecture. The stuff that used by 99% of the people is:
1. Browser
2. IM
3. Media Player
I agree that most 99% of this 99% don't know anything about compilation - Here come ubuntu 9.04 on ARM in just few weeks. and they definitely trully believe that x86 is the only working thing. That's what Intel sells you. x86 is ugly, it was cheap, so it won the market over more elegant architectures. I hope that ARM is only the first to come back to our desktops and notebooks. PowerPC with Cell will probably be the next.


RE: Not the form factor
By Suntan on 3/6/2009 2:29:08 PM , Rating: 2
I care more about actually using things than I do about what is more “elegant” once you get down to the sub-microscopic levels. Would’a, could’a, should’a is fine for a theoretical discussion, but the reality is that x86 has a much larger installed base, and as a result, a much larger selection of things to use.

In addition to firefox and VLC, my netbook is required to run Adobe Lightroom (for tagging and organizing of photos while on the go) and SageTV client (for setting up recordings on the media server, etc.) When those can be handled on an ARM system (without needing to reserve 3 weeks of vacation time to actually get it working) I will be more inclined to look at one.

These are just my personal needs, if a person does not have particular software needs, then any setup may be useful for them, but then I only speak for myself.

-Suntan


RE: Not the form factor
By 91TTZ on 3/10/2009 4:22:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
In Linux world, every architecture supported. It is just a matter of building (compiling) your application with right target architecture. The stuff that used by 99% of the people is: 1. Browser 2. IM 3. Media Player I agree that most 99% of this 99% don't know anything about compilation - Here come ubuntu 9.04 on ARM in just few weeks. and they definitely trully believe that x86 is the only working thing. That's what Intel sells you. x86 is ugly, it was cheap, so it won the market over more elegant architectures. I hope that ARM is only the first to come back to our desktops and notebooks. PowerPC with Cell will probably be the next.


Many companies over the years have challenged the x86 architecture, saying how their architecture is more elegant and will be faster, blah blah blah. So they released their product only to find out that it didn't measure up to the x86. Apple and IBM pushed very hard back in the 90's with the PowerPC, saying how it would overcome x86 in performance. They tried as hard as they could and you know the rest. Apple uses x86 now.

The simple fact is that the x86 architecture is a very good performer. The Cell is a more specialized type of architecture, it's not as general purpose as the x86. Besides, the Cell runs mostly on hype. In reality its performance isn't that great. Remember when everyone was saying how the PS3 was going to be so powerful that it would bury its competitors? Look at it now. Just another overhyped and underperforming system.


"A lot of people pay zero for the cellphone ... That's what it's worth." -- Apple Chief Operating Officer Timothy Cook

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