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Print 41 comment(s) - last by toyotabedzrock.. on Feb 11 at 7:09 PM

There is growing concern among government officials that the United States isn't doing enough protect the country's computer networks

President Barack Obama has issued a 60-day review of federal cyber security just days after numerous high-profile hacker intrusions, including an attack on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

During the review, the government expects to look at the "plans, programs and activities" of U.S. cyber security efforts against both domestic and foreign attacks.

"The national security and economic health of the United States depend on the security, stability, and integrity of our nation's cyberspace, both in the public and private sectors," President Obama's assistant for counterterrorism and homeland security John Brennan said in a statement.

Several security experts accused former President Bush's cybersecurity team of neglecting possible cyber attacks, while also stating the U.S. Department of Homeland Security was ill-equipped to deal with cybersecurity.

The U.S. government has Northrop Grumman, Boeing, and Lockheed Martin working on numerous cyber security projects, although most of the projects are classified.  Industry analysts predict cyber security to one of the fastest-growing markets in the coming years, with the government issuing more than $10 billion in contracts over the next four years.

Security experts are still worried about the unprecedented level of vulnerability facing U.S. assets, as hackers have the potential to destroy banking records, stop electric power distribution, plus a number of other activities that could have a negative effect on the U.S.

In addition, China has drastically increased its cyber espionage, and continues to steal "vast amounts" of classified information from U.S. computer networks while the government continues to do little to stop it.

Obama will also focus on the physical protection of data -- it was recently published a New Zealand man purchased an MP3 player that contained troop deployments in Afghanistan, equipment deployments, private information on soldiers, and other personal information. 



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RE: Obama is a walking security risk
By callmeroy on 2/11/2009 10:35:43 AM , Rating: 3
Well I get the stereotype and while I support the spirit, in all reality though the President doesn't NEED to be a guru on cyber security and grab a hold of the hand rails -- national security either. Now before you (or others) flame post back replies of "ARE YOU FRIGGIN INSANE!" or the like...the President is essentially the executive in charge of the nation's affairs. The President is responsible for our nation's security of course -- to think otherwise is foolish. But he acheives security by having the foresight, diplomatic skills, leadership, intellect and even common sense to refer to the true security experts in our military generals, security consultants, CIA/FBI/NSA, and on and on...but he himself doesn't need to be an expert in National Security.

A presidency is largely a success or failure not just by the president himself but his cabinet...but the public never see that , they just blame the president (which I kind of agree with btw since "the buck stops" at the president -- or at least is supposed to).

As for his blackberry -- its far more secured than any other PDA in the world right now. And do any of us every think in an increasing technology based world that technology would never reach the oval office at some point in time?


RE: Obama is a walking security risk
By Smilin on 2/11/2009 6:08:19 PM , Rating: 2
It's NOT a blackberry. It's a Windows Mobile device and it's very secure.


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