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Ford Transit Connect
The plug-in EV will be available for commercial fleets only

High on the business plans for American automakers are electric vehicles. Advances in electric vehicles were a key component of the business plans of the manufacturers that received billions in aid from the federal government.

Ford hasn’t received aid funds from the government yet, though it may have to if overall automotive sales continue to slump. Still the automaker is big on electric vehicles and has plans for several electric models. Ford announced that it would be working with Smith Electric Vehicles to bring an all-electric cargo van to market.

The van will be the Transit Connect commercial vehicle and it is reported to be coming as a 2010 model. Ford's Derrick Kuzak said in a statement, "The new Transit Connect light commercial vehicle with battery electric power represents the next logical step in our pursuit of even greater fuel economy and sustainability. A growing number of our commercial vehicle fleet clients have expressed interest in electrification as a sustainable mobility solution. By leveraging our global team and asset portfolio, we're able to quickly bring this environmentally friendly, strong 'silent type' to market."

Smith has been converting standard vehicles to electric cars in the UK since 1920 and the company already markets a battery-powered version of the Transit Connect in the UK. Ford and Smith promise that the van will have an all-electric range of 100 miles and will be offered for commercial use only.

The gasoline engine will be replaced with a 50 kW electric motor that will push the van to a top speed of 70 MPH. The payload capacity of the van will be 1,764 pounds making it viable as a commercial transport. Ford's first electric vehicle for consumers -- the Focus EV -- will debut in 2011.



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By psychobriggsy on 2/9/2009 10:58:30 AM , Rating: 2
Well this is a great van for cities like London that don't apply the congestion charge to vehicles if they're electric or very very low emission. Such a van is also a good size for the roads in those areas as well. Of course you would have to limit the distance that the van could do on its delivery route because of the distance limit ...

It just depends if the savings from using electricity to recharge, and savings from avoiding the congestion charge over the vehicles lifespan, are more than the extra cost of the vehicle over the petrol equivalent.




By blowfish on 2/9/2009 11:16:48 AM , Rating: 2
Cost savings will come with volume production. It's really only the battery cost and low production volume that would make such a van more expensive than a regular petrol or diesel van.

A battery electric vehicle does not need a complex transmission, a clutch, water pump, etc. That's a big reason the auto makers have not really tried hard to develop them. Add to that the much greater longevity and simplicity of an electric motor compared with the highly sophisitcated and expensive engineering involved in modern internal combustion engines.

Once the battery technology is right, the fuel cell blind alley will be abandoned, and fuel cells will take their rightful place in combined heat and power installations.


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation

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