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The market for netbooks is expected to hit 139 million by 2013

The netbook category is the hottest computer category posting the largest growth numbers in all of the market. Many consumers are choosing netbooks because they offer a low price entry into computing. Some are buying netbooks not for the price, but for the portability that the machines offer.

ABI Research announced today that it expects 35 million netbooks to ship in 2009. According to the research firm, social and technological factors have worked together to create a sort of perfect storm for the netbook market in the next few years.

Forecasts by the research firm predict that by 2013 139 million netbooks will be shipping. ABI's Kevin Burden said in a statement, "PDA’s began our reliance on instant accessible data while traveling. When PDA functionality converged with cellular voice, smartphones became the new darling of mobile professional technology that many expected to evolve into the hub for all data and communication needs for travelling professionals. Today, with a better understanding for what a smartphone is, is not, and may never be, along with a reality check on the usefulness of UMPCs, the market remains open for new device types."

Burden points out that low-cost and power miserly x86 and ARM CPUs has been the key to the netbook revolution. These processors allow users to get very close to their normal desktop or notebook computer experience in a much smaller package that offers longer battery life in most instances.

Burden continued saying, "In recent years, the industry still expected the smartphones to be more than they turned out to be, and most recently, MIDs were thought to be the next big mobile devices segment, but an unclear usage model continues to confuse the market. So today, netbooks’ time has come, and ABI research expects them to enjoy very strong market growth."

However, some analysts predict that increasing sales of netbooks is a bad thing for the CPU market. As the majority of sales begins to center on low-cost, and low profit netbook CPUs sales of more profitable CPUs may drop.



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RE: Translation
By Pirks on 1/26/2009 2:02:20 PM , Rating: 3
As much as I love AMD I went for Intel anyway (been using Athlons exclusively for past 5 years too). I just can't stand absolutely insane speed I get from cheapo 3.6 GHz OCed Wolfdale with 6MB cache with some insanely cheapo DDR2-1066 for $20 CAN per GB with tax (jeeez...).

Man, I'm hooked on Intel again. Although I must admit AMD's recent quads are pretty cool stuff, but I won't need a quad for a loooong time.

What AMD needs is high speed chip with a few cores (2 is more than enough) some insane amount of cache, some decent OC while having lower TDP than now, and being equal with Wolfdales clock for clock.

Unfortunately AMD is all about server CPUs these days, with lotsa cores and stuff. Good for them, I heard server CPUs make Very Big Money and Intel is still getting its blue @ss kicked there by Opterons. So, let's stop worrying about AMD, to each his own. AMD is a leader in expensive servers while Intel became a leader in cheapo desktops, gaming rigs, and netbooks. It's a pretty good market setup, right?


RE: Translation
By rudolphna on 1/26/2009 2:12:51 PM , Rating: 2
unfortunately they buy computers based on what is available, and benchmarks, power consumption etc. If you go to best buy, 90% of the computers you see are Intel. And until recently, Intel dominated the benchmarks, for the most part. And AMD defeinetely could not stand up to intel on power consumption until Phenom II


RE: Translation
By Pirks on 1/26/2009 2:22:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
they buy computers based on what is available, and benchmarks, power consumption etc
You too forgot about the price. Most people do consider the price when buying PC and price/performance wise AMD is totally on par with Intel for vast majority of people. The only exception are overclockers but they are a minority on the market. With latest Phenoms AMD started to encroach even that (overclocking) territory, which is better than nothing. Altghough I'm not very impressed 'cause I'm a gamer and Phenoms are not the best gaming CPUs (Wolfdale forever!!!)


RE: Translation
By MikeMurphy on 1/26/2009 3:00:11 PM , Rating: 2
As a recent owner of an EEE 1000HA Netbook there is no doubt in my mind that these are going to continue to improve in popularity.

The Atom seems to run just as well as my old 1.7ghz Northwood laptop with the exception of the i945 chipset which offers a sparse amount of 3D rendering power. Slap in 2gb of memory and you have a very capable mobile system.

One thing I did notice when using mine is that it is NOT a replacement for a full-size computer. The terrible screen resolution (1024x600) makes using a full-size screen VERY refreshing.

Anyways, here is hoping someone can offer an even better package with some reasonable 3D capabilities. Even the Athlon 1000+ with a 780G would be more appealing to me in a netbook than the Atom with the i945 chipset. The ION platform using the Atom and the 9400M chip would be and ideal combo!


RE: Translation
By degeester on 1/26/2009 10:26:46 PM , Rating: 2
Unfortunately business in general isn't buying or replacing servers. Expensive or otherwise.


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