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RIM says that software glitches are now the norm for complex devices

The smartphone market is booming and the most popular of the smartphones is the Apple iPhone. With the sales figures the touch-enabled iPhone is racking up, it's no surprise that virtually all of the cell phone makers have rushed devices to market to compete with the iPhone.

One of the competitors that many had high hopes for was the Blackberry Storm. The Storm was the first touch screen device to come from Blackberry. Unfortunately for Blackberry, the Storm received some of the worst reviews of any Blackberry device.

The problem according to many users is that the Storm is besieged with bugs that hamper performance and results in overall sluggish performance. RIM, the maker of the Blackberry handsets, didn’t apologize for the problems with the handset. Rather RIM co-chief Jim Balsillie said that scrambles to launch products on time and software glitches are part of the "new reality" of making complex phones in large volumes.

Smartphone users are to assume, according to Balsillie, that it is normal for a device that barely functions to be rushed out simply to meet the Black Friday shopping rush. The Wall Street Journal reports that people familiar with the matter say that RIM moved 500,000 Storm's in the first 30 days after its November 21 launch.

By comparison, the Apple iPhone 3G moved 2.4 million units in its first quarter on the market. The iPhone now holds about 16.6 percent of the global smartphone market. Balsillie says that RIM considers the Storm an overwhelming success and is making 250,000 devices per week to keep up with demand.

RIM is working to fix issues with the Storm and to add features that users have asked for. One of the complaints that will be addressed in future updates is that users can’t type on a full keypad in portrait mode, which only allows a keypad with multiple letters at this time. Verizon, the exclusive carrier for the Storm, and RIM released a software update to address some of the early issues with the Storm that the companies claim fixed many of the early complaints users had.

As for returns, Verizon won’t issue a specific number. However, a Verizon spokesman said that the rate of returns for the Strom is in the single digits (percentage wise) and the spokesman says that is normal for any smartphone.

Sources close to the launch say that Verizon and RIM rushed the Storm to market before the software was fully vetted in an attempt to get the Storm into stores in time for holiday shopping, despite glitches in the software and the stability of the operating system.

The Storm's operating system was reported to have been a challenge for RIM because the OS was optimized for Blackberry devices that used keyboards, click wheels, and trackballs for navigation rather than a touch screen. Part of the OS tweaks made was to integrate compatibility for the accelerometer that changed the orientation of the screen when the phone was rotated.



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Whoa
By SkateNY on 1/27/2009 4:00:29 AM , Rating: 1
Glitches are now a part of something I pay for? What's next? A broken engine should be expected on my next car purchase? A partly visible screen should be expected on my next TV? I should expect that, when visiting a new physician for a routine physical, that he/she misses the fact that I have cancer or diabetes?

Sorry people, but there's no excuse for the disaster that has become the Blackberry Storm, just as there is no excuse for Microsoft's most recent debacle, AKA, Windows Vista.

In each case, there is a mature and profitable company with virtually unlimited resources that had more than enough time to do a much better job than they did while, at the same time, charging their customers a premium price for what was hyped as a breakthrough product.

What a shock. Another rushed-to-market iPhone killer bites the dust. The Storm almost makes Microsoft's Zune look good. And that certainly takes some doing.

Apple's Steve Jobs set the standard, and continues to stay on the same course: Forget about competing; just do what you do best. And you know what? If Apple wanted to do it, they could become one of the nation's biggest banks right now. They have zero debt and more cash than any of us could possibly spend in a lifetime.

What irks me most about the Storm -- or, more accurately, Storm apologists -- is that so many people were so willing to bash reviewers who forewarned them that the Storm is/was a broken toy out of the box -- perhaps the most notable reviewer is David Pogue -- yet they not only bashed him and others who provided similar reviews, but then went out and bought one anyway.

Worse than this, the so-called positive "reviewers" and self-reported Storm owners who, seemingly paid by the word, told us how much they loved their Storm; how much better it is than the iPhone; how much better it is than anything else available in the Universe. These people are not only reprehensible for their moral failings; they're disgusting examples of what the most mean-spirited, most greedy and most despicable among us can be.

Stupidity sometimes kills people. Other times, it just helps people part with their money in a speedy fashion. But those who suffer from it ultimately get both.




"There's no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance." -- Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer

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