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LG Chem has won the battery contract to produce battery cells for the Chevy Volt. The lithium power cells, developed by LG subsidiary Compact Power, are similar to the cells shown here. While the cells are made overseas, GM will manufacture the battery packs domestically in Michigan.  (Source: EV World)
GM makes big battery announcements at NAIAS 2009





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RE: Sad
By mdogs444 on 1/13/2009 7:19:53 PM , Rating: 1
Considering that these "cheapass Americans" who could afford these products are already paying 25%+ in federal income taxes to support, above all things, entitlement programs - why exactly would they want to pay MORE money out of pocket to support these types of products when the workers at these plants are getting $60+/hr to sweet floors?

quote:
nor will they work in sweatshops to ensure competitive product pricing

Ahh yes. Damn that industrial revolution that helped increase the standard of living for everyone in the United States. How dare those Americans refuse to be slave labor so you can afford a better car while not working as hard!


RE: Sad
By foolsgambit11 on 1/14/2009 4:45:32 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Considering that these "cheapass Americans" who could afford these products are already paying 25%+ in federal income taxes to support, above all things, entitlement programs - why exactly would they want to pay MORE money out of pocket to support these types of products when the workers at these plants are getting $60+/hr to sweet floors?
I never claimed to have an answer. I was just pointing out that the problem can be viewed from multiple angles. Yet another angle to view the problem from could be to blame the government. But not how you'd like to blame it. You could blame the government's free trade policy. Without free trade agreements, we could place import duties on foreign products so that products from Korea or Singapore cost the same as similar products made in America. That was the old way of doing things, and it 'worked'. (I personally like the idea of free trade - but I also like the idea of the free movement of labor.)

By the way, workers don't get $60/hr to sweep floors; you're misunderstanding labor costs versus wages. But, anyway, I would say the problem with the U.S. tax structure isn't the percent of income spent on taxes, but rather the lack of benefits generated by those expenditures.

The cost-benefit analysis would be perceived as much better, for instance, if we moved to a nationalized health care system. We're currently all paying for health insurance for the most expensive people to care for. The addition of the millions of healthy people in America to a national health care program would decrease average costs per person, and would give everybody a sense of getting something for the money they put in. And it wouldn't cost that much more - the additional taxes would be less than current insurance costs.

Additional cost savings in government could be achieved by cutting Defense's budget by 25%, with the possibility of further cuts. The total military defense budget for 2009 is roughly $650 billion - plus the costs of Iraq and Afghanistan. The average individual (or married filing jointly), assuming all savings went to their taxes, would get a $1000 (or $2000 if married filing jointly) tax rebate every year from a 25% cut in defense spending. That's twice the stimulus proposed in Obama's one-time stimulus package.

We could increase sales tax and excise taxes (consumption taxes) in place of income taxes - this would ensure that the tax burden was more equitable, since it was based on how much you spend. Excise taxes could also decrease the relative difference between foreign and domestic product prices (a $25,000 US-made car costs 25% more than a $20,000 foreign car, let's say. If you put a $5000 excise tax on both, then the $30,000 US car is only 20% more than the $25,000 foreign one.) The down side is that consumption taxes have negative economic effects, by discouraging consumer spending.

quote:
Damn that industrial revolution that helped increase the standard of living for everyone in the United States. How dare those Americans refuse to be slave labor so you can afford a better car while not working as hard!
I think you may have forgotten your history. The industrial revolution didn't do much to increase the standard of living for everyone in the United States. Unionization did that. That same unionization you curse in your first paragraph. I'm not saying unions are perfect (far from it), but they have done a lot of good when it comes to raising workers' compensation standards.


RE: Sad
By Spuke on 1/14/2009 5:08:27 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
but they have done a lot of good when it comes to raising workers' compensation standards in the past .
Fixed that for you.


RE: Sad
By Alexvrb on 1/14/2009 11:05:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The addition of the millions of healthy people in America to a national health care program would decrease average costs per person
Yeah lets shift the costs onto the healthy working citizens. Not to mention every time little Timmy gets a sniffle, he's off to the doctor at everyone's expense. Why not? It's already paid for. It's like having all phone plans come with mandatory unlimited minutes. Might as well use em. Not to mention that fact that you seem to think putting control of ANYTHING into the hands of the government is going to decrease costs. That's interesting. Say, I've got a bridge for sale...

quote:
and would give everybody a sense of getting something for the money they put in.
Yeah right. Just like all the other programs we benefit from, which are paid for with our tax money. Give it a while, and most people will take this for granted too. It would be yet another entitlement.


"So if you want to save the planet, feel free to drive your Hummer. Just avoid the drive thru line at McDonalds." -- Michael Asher










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