backtop


Print 65 comment(s) - last by flipsu5.. on Dec 23 at 10:21 AM

Researchers have devised a way to build memory from graphene

Storage in today's computers is based on rotating magnetic platters or flash memory. Both of these mediums work well, provide large amounts of storage and have been around for a while now. Some scientists don’t believe that flash is the future for storage in computers and electronic devices. In fact, the future of storage could be based on something kids use every day at school -- pencil lead or graphite.

A team of researchers at Rice University has found a method of creating a new type of memory from a strip of graphite only 10 atoms thick. Graphite is the basic element in the new type of memory. The scientists describe in a paper published in the online journal Nature Materials a storage device that utilizes the conducting properties of graphene. A large clump of graphene is better known as graphite, something school kids doodle with everyday.

Rice professor James Tour says that graphene memory would increase the amount of storage in a two-dimensional array by about five times. He says that this massive improvement is due to the individual bits being able to be made smaller than 10 nanometers. By comparison, circuitry in your average flash memory chip today is 45nm. Another big benefit of graphene memory is that switches can be controlled by two terminals rather than the three terminals used in flash memory today.

The two-terminal capability is important because it provides the capability to make three-dimensional memory practical since the very thin graphene arrays can be stacked, multiplying the storage capacity of the array with each graphene layer.

Storage arrays using graphene will be mechanical devices at their core and as such, the chips will consume very little power. Much lost power in flash storage comes from leakage; graphene memory will need little power leading to less leakage while keeping data intact. Graphene memory has a massive improvement in on-off power ratio compared to current memory technologies.

Tour said in a statement, "It’s (power savings) huge — a million-to-one. Phase change memory, the other thing the industry is considering, runs at 10-to-1. That means the ‘off’ state holds, say, one-tenth the amount of electrical current than the ‘on’ state."

Tour explains that current tends to leak from an off that is holding a charge. He says, "That means in a 10-by-10 grid, 10 ‘offs’ would leak enough to look like they were ‘on.’ With our method, it would take a million ‘offs’ in a line to look like ‘on'. So this is big. It allows us to make a much larger array.”

Another benefit of graphene as a storage medium is that while it puts off little heat, it is able to operate in a very wide temperature range. The researchers have tested the system to minus 75 to over 200 degrees Celsius.

Performance of graphene-based systems is impressive, the researchers say that the new switches are faster than the lab's testing equipment can measure and they promise long life as well. "We’ve tested it in the lab 20,000 times with no degradation,” said Tour. “Its lifetime is going to be huge, much better than flash memory."

The processes uses graphene deposited on silicon via chemical vapor deposition making for easy construction that can be done in commercial volumes with methods already available says Tour.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Mechanical devices are for kids to...
By Gzus666 on 12/19/2008 3:49:31 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Google "wear levelling" for all the information you need. You can write the same bit to a hard drive hundreds of millions of times. Flash is way behind this. The "Bad Thing" about moving parts is they wear out. But if you're doing heavy writes, flash memory is more of a "moving part" than any hard drive ever thought about. If you're doing almost all reads, or you're in some extreme shock environment, flash is much more reliable, yeah. But conflating "moving parts" with "bad" isn't always true.


Flash is not the only option for this, I thought that was the point of these technologies? We know flash has it's downfalls, that is why all this money and time goes to these other technologies. Solid state doesn't indefinitely mean flash. I'm not really sure why you make this comparison as the article is about future tech, not what we currently produce.

quote:
Ok I give up. The information content of that statement is zero. Maybe English isn't your native language or something.


That is because it was never directed at you, ignore it. I never asked for your opinion on it as it was directed to be within the context of his statement. He wants to hold onto mechanical hard drives forever cause he understands them better, I said let them go. Move on, it isn't that big of a deal, you are blowing it well out of proportion.


RE: Mechanical devices are for kids to...
By whiskerwill on 12/19/2008 3:57:28 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Flash is not the only option for this,
Its the option you said was "more reliable" than hard drives. I showed you that's not always true.

quote:
He wants to hold onto mechanical hard drives forever cause he understands them better
What he actually said was "I'll stop buying as soon as something better comes along". What was your native language again?


RE: Mechanical devices are for kids to...
By Gzus666 on 12/19/2008 4:25:28 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Its the option you said was "more reliable" than hard drives. I showed you that's not always true.


I said solid state, not flash. Solid state is quite broad and does not specify one of these technologies, you were the one that decided flash was the topic and I refused to follow.

quote:
What he actually said was "I'll stop buying as soon as something better comes along". What was your native language again?


Please quote where he said that, as I see it nowhere in his post.


RE: Mechanical devices are for kids to...
By whiskerwill on 12/19/2008 4:36:32 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I said solid state, not flash
Lol, you're pathetic. I said "hard drives are more reliable than flash if you're writing a lot". You accuse me of pulling facts out of my ass, then when you're proven wrong, you pull this? I'd be angry if I wasn't laughing so hard.

quote:
Please quote where he said that, as I see it nowhere in his post.


Sure. He said, "I'll "let them go" when the alternative is more reliable, faster, and cheaper". See it now?

For those of us who actually speak English, that translates to "I'll stop buying when something better comes along".


By Gzus666 on 12/19/2008 4:52:25 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Lol, you're pathetic. I said "hard drives are more reliable than flash if you're writing a lot". You accuse me of pulling facts out of my ass, then when you're proven wrong, you pull this? I'd be angry if I wasn't laughing so hard.


You chose to argue flash, I said solid state. Sure, you are right for flash, so? That isn't the topic of the article. I said show some stats or you pulled it out of your ass, which is essentially true. Everything requires proof, get over yourself. To get mad over someone asking for reference is childish.

Also the point still stands that mechanical hard drives are more likely to have catastrophic failures from mechanical parts breaking, something solid state does not have these mechanical downfalls. Add in the suggested head and you have added significant point of failure. If you want the drive to match something solid state for performance, you will have to take a lot of failure risk.

quote:
Sure. He said, "I'll "let them go" when the alternative is more reliable, faster, and cheaper". See it now? For those of us who actually speak English, that translates to "I'll stop buying when something better comes along".


I have a feeling we were talking about different people, I was mainly referring to rudolphina or whatever his name is. Also I agreed with waiting till something matching those variables happens. I thought that was the point of this article to show that something viable was coming.

Either way if this or IBM's technology comes through, it would mean time to phase out mechanical. The original poster I was referring to seemed to think we should just keep using them forever since they are easier.


"We can't expect users to use common sense. That would eliminate the need for all sorts of legislation, committees, oversight and lawyers." -- Christopher Jennings

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki