backtop


Print 33 comment(s) - last by slunkius.. on Dec 8 at 1:14 AM


  (Source: Wired's Threat Level)
Firefox extension Linked Users to Same Product at The Pirate Bay

Internet pirates were in for a brief surprise Wednesday: art students from the Netherlands launched “Pirates of the Amazon,” a Firefox extension that linked Amazon.com product pages to their equivalent listing at The Pirate Bay. The following day, however, the website hosting the project took it offline after it received threats from Amazon.com lawyers.

The add-on’s authors are thus far anonymous, identifying themselves only as students of a Media Design M.A. course at a Netherlands-based university. Their website currently describes the project as a “practical experiment on interface design, information access and currently debated issues in media culture.”

“We were surprised by the attentions and the strong reactions this project received,” reads the site. “Ultimately, the value of the project lies in these reactions.”

A description of the add-on before it was taken down said its authors wanted it to be a “counterpart to the current models of media distribution,” and to “redistribute the wealth.”

Indeed, within a day of the add-on’s launch, its authors received a takedown request from Amazon.com’s legal department.

WHOIS records and what appears to be an artzilla.org posting indicate that the domain is held by artist Timo Klok, and that the add-on is to be publicly exhibited at an art festival at the end of next week.

Dslreports.com user “funchords” notes that the add-on retreives the “download 4 free” image from it’s home site, allowing administrators to monitor the extension’s spread through web server logs. It is unknown as to whether or not the add-on was designed with this in mind.

According to TorrentFreak, the add-on’s authors are not affiliated with The Pirate Bay – despite evidence that the add-on’s code transmits its queries to The Pirate Bay under the user-agent string “Pirates-of-the-Amazon”. The DSLreports posting describing this behavior posits that it was simply a “cute thing to do.”

Amazon.com did not respond to repeated request for comment from Wired’s Threat Level.

While the add-on is no longer available from its original page, a working mirror is available from TorrentFreak.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

By Conficio on 12/5/2008 3:43:17 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
This is normal. For McDs, I'm guessing they are looking for things such as theft, fraud, abuse/assault. would you want to hire someone who's been convicted of theft from his employer? I think not.

You are making my point. It is up to society to make such judgments and to society to decide what are the punishments. If we follow your logic, then the criminal conviction does hang over your head for life, never goes away and never allows you a life w/o fear or a chance to integrate into society. Is there not such a concept of "you go to jail and that is your punishment" and when you get our of prison you get a chance to do the right thing?

I hear often politicians talk that way in their sound bites. But that does not make it smart in any way.

If you punish every crime with a life sentence, whether in prison or in the restricted life you allow an ex convict to have, it certainly violates the idea that punishment should fit the crime. It also produces people (neighbors) that have little to loose, because the difference between a life with little future and a life in prison is not that great anymore. This just makes any future punishment so much less of a deterrent.

P.S.: I'm not making any legal argument here.

quote:
1. That is for the civil courts to decide. 2. Post-secondary education is a privilege, not a right. You follow the rules or they can kick you out.


Again, I'm not looking at what is legal (So no comment on 1.) but at what are the consequences. If you punish a young person for life for something that is a one time failure, and certainly not always black and white (How is an ethics code to be interpreted? How a statement of suicidal thoughts?). What you get is a person that has a life long grudge, that can't fulfill his or her potential and is likely at some point to retaliate. I simply think a teaching institution like a university does fail its mission if it acts like this.

What kind of teaching is that if a single mistake, often only verbal and of no real consequences, does make you ineligible for (their) education? Isn't education about learning from your mistakes?


By masher2 (blog) on 12/5/2008 4:05:04 PM , Rating: 2
> "It is up to society to make such judgments and to society to decide what are the punishments"

Again you confuse free choice with government-dictated punishment. Putting someone in jail is a punishment. Exercising your choice to not offer someone a job is freedom. Are ugly people being "punished" by not being hired as models? Are short people being punished by not being signed by NBA basketball teams?

If I find out my neighbor did time for rape and murder, I have a right to not invite him over for dinner. If I own a business and find out a job prospect has regularly stolen from other bosses, I have a right to not offer him a job.

Freedom. It's a simple concept...but remarkably difficult for some to grasp.

> "If you punish a young person for life for something that is a one time failure,"

Are we still talking about the suicide attempt here? I don't see how anyone was "punished for life". So they got kicked out of one school. Stop whining, and go apply to a different one. Big deal.


By gmyx on 12/5/2008 7:36:06 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
If you punish every crime with a life sentence, whether in prison or in the restricted life you allow an ex convict to have, it certainly violates the idea that punishment should fit the crime. It also produces people (neighbors) that have little to loose, because the difference between a life with little future and a life in prison is not that great anymore. This just makes any future punishment so much less of a deterrent.


Ever hear of a pardon. I don't know how long it takes to get one in the USA, but in Canada it's 8 (i think) years minimum depending on the crime. Once you have your pardon, no one can hold it over you head from a job perspective, but your reputation is still there.

quote:
If you punish a young person for life for something that is a one time failure, and certainly not always black and white (How is an ethics code to be interpreted? How a statement of suicidal thoughts?). What you get is a person that has a life long grudge, that can't fulfill his or her potential and is likely at some point to retaliate. I simply think a teaching institution like a university does fail its mission if it acts like this.


Is there only once place in the universe to get an education? Many places will allow someone who has been kicked out a second chance - because there is money to be made. Don't let one incident that may or may not of been properly reported skew your view of education. Many people do not get kicked out for suicidal thought - they get help.

Mental health is a serious issue that needs addressing - one bad example is not the rule.


"Well, we didn't have anyone in line that got shot waiting for our system." -- Nintendo of America Vice President Perrin Kaplan











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki