backtop


Print 37 comment(s) - last by Darkk.. on Nov 26 at 12:25 AM

Government bans use of flash drives and begins to collect them after undisclosed virus plagues computers

Pentagon officials admitted an undisclosed virus has hit some Pentagon and DoD computers, which has forced officials to confiscate flash drives and ban the use of external hardware drives until further notice.

"We are aware of a global virus for which there are some public alerts on," said Pentagon spokesperson Bryan Whitman.  "And we've seen some of this on our networks.  And we're taking steps to identify and mitigate the virus."

Pentagon officials did not disclose which virus has infected government computers, or whether or not it has spread to classified computer networks.

The Pentagon computer network is made up of around 17,000 networks and seven million individual computers.  Pentagon computers are scanned for weaknesses millions of times each day by foreign computer users, Pentagon officials admitted.  

A November 17 Air Force internal memo issued the "immediate suspension" of flash drives used on any computer hooked up to both classified and unclassified computer networks.  The mandatory collection of USB flash drives is underway, with the possibility the drives will not be returned to their owners after the security check is complete.

China has been ruled out as the source of the Pentagon's latest security issue; although it's possible Russia or attackers from another Eastern European nation are involved in the security breach.

There's a growing concern of foreign-based computer attackers, especially from Chinese and Russian attackers, who have reportedly attacked computers in the United States, United Kingdom, France, and other nations.  The attacks normally are to help gain access to classified information and to test government security in an effort to better coordinate larger scale attacks in the future.  

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) also has created new rules for DHS employees who attempt to use portable storage devices and flash drives connected to work computers.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Days ago
By marvdmartian on 11/24/2008 10:38:29 AM , Rating: 2
Um, yeah.....old news!

http://blog.wired.com/defense/2008/11/army-bans-us...

For those interested, this includes not only jump drives, but also usb interfaced hard drives and even digital cameras. This is a nasty little worm, from what I hear!

Really sad, though. The government runs a half crippled version of windows xp (soon to go to vista, though why I'll never understand!), blocks all sorts of websites due to objectionable content, blocks spam e-mails (so no clicking on ads for ED drugs, etc, like someone below thought)..... yet they still have problems with crap like this worm! I get a kick out of it, since the week before, they told everyone to stop putting recorded media in their cd drives, and I'd bet that's where they thought the worm originated from. Yeah, I'm sure my Christmas mp3 disk has all sorts of nasty viruses on it! ;)


RE: Days ago
By Alexstarfire on 11/24/2008 1:27:28 PM , Rating: 2
So memory cards are still legit then? Cause I could just use my phone then. Course the government agents should be better trained for technology. It affects them the most.


RE: Days ago
By Spuke on 11/24/2008 3:37:31 PM , Rating: 2
Memory cards are banned too.


RE: Days ago
By marvdmartian on 11/24/2008 3:46:10 PM , Rating: 2
Even rewriteable optical disks (cdrw & dvdrw). Since all the floppy drives in use anymore are usb.....guess what? Yeah, not even floppy drives!


"If you look at the last five years, if you look at what major innovations have occurred in computing technology, every single one of them came from AMD. Not a single innovation came from Intel." -- AMD CEO Hector Ruiz in 2007











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki