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Verizon will bring femtocells to market in 2009 that work with any Verizon handsets

Many cell phone users find that indoor coverage can be spotty at best. Dead spots inside homes or offices make it hard to get a signal and talk without interference or dropped calls. This is especially problematic for users who only use cell phones.

One way to improve cellular coverage indoors is by using a device that resembles your typical wireless router, known as a femtocell. Verizon Wireless has announced that it will be selling its first femtocell early next year. Verizon had previously said that it would launch femtocells this year, what led to the delay is unknown.

Verizon isn’t the only cellular provider that is offering femtocells. Both Sprint and T-Mobile offer femtocells to customers. The femtocell connects the cellular phone of a user to the broadband internet connection in a home or office to route calls over the internet.

Like any other VOIP service, call quality is likely to be affected by the available bandwidth on the network at the time. Sprint's femtocell is far from the bargain users will hope for at $99.99 for the hardware and an additional $10 to $20 per month for the privilege of using the femtocell.

T-Mobile also offers a femtocell-like service from called HotSpot@Home and requires a special handset to use whereas the Sprint and coming Verizon femtocells will work with any handset. Verizon is still mum on how much its femtocell will cost and what fees the femtocell will carry monthly. Pricing is likely to be in line with what Sprint charges for its femtocell service.



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I don't get it....
By croc on 10/29/2008 6:10:28 PM , Rating: 2
Verizon has a poorly serviced area... A company has a 'whole of company' contract with that carrier. So the company has to pay for a micro-cell to get adequate coverage in their building? Is the concept of SLA's unknown in the US? Do all carriers have to have their own cell towers in CBD areas? (I'd sure hate to be a transmission engineer tasked with frequency mapping...)In AUS (and most other OECD countries) cell towers in high traffic areas are shared. Other carriers pay their share of maintenance costs. AUS has another minor problem, and that is size per capita. We still manage to cover 95% of a country (80% the size of the US landmass 10% the population) and 100% taking sat-phones and data services into acount. I don't pay for you calling, texting, spamming, whatever - you do.

Is the US really still part of the OECD???




RE: I don't get it....
By Doormat on 10/29/2008 11:15:45 PM , Rating: 2
Most companies don't own towers anymore. They got rid of them a while back and now some third party company (or companies) have towers where they put everyone's equipment, and I believe they also manage the backhaul.

And yes, SLAs for cellphones are pretty much nonexistant. We moved into our new building a year ago and have horrible VZW coverage, but AT&T is great, so my boss got an iPhone instead. He carries two phones now, and it sucks, but thats what you have to do.


RE: I don't get it....
By axeman1957 on 11/3/2008 6:26:59 PM , Rating: 2
I would like to point out that Verizon is not based in the US... Passing on the cost to the consumer and offering poor service is not exclusive to the US.


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