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Pre-beta Windows 7 OS will be given to developers at coming conferences

Microsoft Windows Vista is still considered relatively new on the market and some users have not yet upgraded from Windows XP to Vista for a variety of reasons. Microsoft is continuing to allow certain types of computers to run Windows XP thanks to its lower cost and overhead.

Despite being released less than two years ago to the general public, Microsoft is hard at work on the replacement for Vista. DailyTech reported that the next Microsoft PC operating system -- codenamed Windows 7 -- had its first setback in September.  Microsoft had planned to offer the first Windows 7 Beta in October of 2008, that date slipped to December 2008.

Microsoft's Mike Nash wrote in a blog post that Microsoft would be providing a pre-beta version of Windows 7 exclusively to developers to attendees at the PDC and WinHEC developers conferences.

Nash also wrote in the blog post that Microsoft has decided on the final name for the next Windows operating system, and it's one we are familiar with. Microsoft has decided to call the operating system Windows 7. This is the first time a Windows operating system has kept its codename as the official name.

Nash wrote, "The decision to use the name Windows 7 is about simplicity. Over the years, we have taken different approaches to naming Windows.  We've used version numbers like Windows 3.11, or dates like Windows 98, or ‘aspirational’ monikers like Windows XP or Windows Vista.  And since we do not ship new versions of Windows every year, using a date did not make sense. Likewise, coming up with an all-new ‘aspirational’ name does not do justice to what we are trying to achieve, which is to stay firmly rooted in our aspirations for Windows Vista, while evolving and refining the substantial investments in platform technology in Windows Vista into the next generation of Windows."

Details on Windows 7 are still scant, but Nash says that Microsoft will be sharing more in the coming weeks. To this point, feature wise it is known that the OS will support multi-touch and use the same driver system as Windows Vista.



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By Motoman on 10/14/2008 3:23:32 PM , Rating: 1
I have to agree about the ribbon crap. OMG. I gave Office 2007 an honest year - wasn't going to get rid of it before I really, really tried to get along with it.

Once a year passed, it was uninstalled, and 2003 went back on.

Not to date myself, but I got a computer science degree in 1994 and have been in IT ever since. Truth be told, I don't honestly do *much* with Office...pretty basic Word docs, Excel spreadsheets, PowerPoints. Nothing fancy at all. Don't ever even use things like mail merge or anything.

I ***HATED*** that stupid ribbon interface. I could not find anything I wanted...god it was stupid. Mind-blowingly obvious things, like saving or printing, became a huge pain in the ass.

The ribbon interface is a massive, steaming pile of shite. If Windows 7 comes out with the ribbon throughout, I guess I'll be on XP for another few years...

Vista provides absolutely nothing valuable...and has all the downsides as a bonus. If Windows 7 also provides nothing valuable, but adds more downsides (like the ribbon), it'll tank even faster than Vista.


By Zshazz on 10/14/2008 5:14:48 PM , Rating: 2
I personally don't understand why you found it so difficult to get use to. I found the interface to be far more intuitive and more memorable. Saving & printing are done from the office button (which use to be the file menu) or the customizable quick access toolbar, if you use them without the usual "ctrl+s" and "ctrl+p" shortcuts. Most of your stuff is under the Home tab. If you want to change how the document is being viewed, you go under the view tab (zoom and such is under here, as well as if you want to view 2 pages at once). If you want to change how the page is laid out (such as indentation, columns, margins, etc) then it's the Page Layout tab.

I could go on, but it just goes to show you how everything is laid out. Sure, if you're use to the old interface, it should be difficult to switch over (and they really should have offered to support the old layout for this reason alone), but new users will find the new interface easier to use and more effective for the most part.


By Motoman on 10/14/2008 9:09:46 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Saving & printing are done from the office button (which use to be the file menu) or the customizable quick access toolbar, if you use them without the usual "ctrl+s" and "ctrl+p" shortcuts.


...that's kind of my point right there. The only shortcuts I ever use are for copy & paste...have never used them for printing/saving, and I think that's pretty consistent with the vast majority of basic users who don't do anything but click on icons.

I think it's safe to say that the 2 most-used functions in Word (or Excel for that matter) are Print and Save. What kind of a blithering idiot would hide those 2 functions under a menu by default - not having any way to Print or Save on the effing ribbon, and instead "oh, well you can customize this one little toolbar with the unique functions that you personally use a lot." Like Print and Save!? That's like somebody selling a laptop without an optical drive and expecting people to like it. Oh wait...


By noirsoft on 10/14/2008 10:11:26 PM , Rating: 2
Hidden? Save is on the quick toolbar by default, and how is "print" more connected to the word "file" than the office mennu, which is the main menu for the program?

Both are less hidden than before once you take ten seconds to stop foaming at the mouth and use the program.


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