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Rumors also say NVIDIA will report another quarterly loss

NVIDIA is certainly on the skids financially thanks to several different factors. The company is traditionally one of the most profitable in the GPU and chipset business and commonly turns in significantly improved profits each quarter.

That all changed  in Q2 of fiscal 2009 when it announced a loss attributed in part to a massive one time charge relating to higher than normal failure rates of certain notebook GPUs it sold computer makers like HP and Dell.

In August, rumors started to circulate that NVIDIA would be leaving the chipset business. NVIDIA strongly denied these rumors and said that the reports were false. NVIDIA pointed to the fact that it held 60% of the chipset market for AMD platforms in Q2 2008, SLI was the preferred multi-GPU platform, and its 790i SLI chipset was preferred by editors worldwide as reasons the rumor were false.

Later in August, the announcement was made that NVIDIA would be enabling SLI on Intel's new X58 chipset without requiring the use of its nForce 200 chip. NVIDIA had previously not allowed anyone to enable SLI without including this chip in the design. This move has been seen by some as an indication that NVIDIA is softening its stance on requiring its chipsets as a possible set up for an exit of the chipset business -- without affecting its SLI market.

NVIDIA is unable to shake the rumors that it is leaving the chipset business. CNET News reports that the rumor has surfaced again. The rumor was churned by a Pacific Crest analyst who said, "our checks confirm" NVIDIA will be leaving the chipset business next year.

Further speculation has NVIDIA pre-announcing another loss for Q3 that ends in October. The report of additional losses would be no big surprise with the computer industry as a whole seeing significant revenue reductions due to the weak economy.

Alongside the rumor that NVIDIA would leave the chipset business, another rumor is propagating. The rumor has NVIDIA providing graphics chips for the MacBook systems expected to be announced on October 14. Reports claim that NVIDIA is showing internal prototypes of Mac systems running its GPUs. NVIDIA already provides the graphics chip in MacBook Pro systems, so it would not be that big a shock to find out this rumor is correct.

Adding more fuel to the rumor that NVIDIA will see continued reductions in profits is the prediction from Pacific Crest analysts that NVIDIA could see market losses in the notebook segment to Intel's Montevina integrated graphics processor.

CNET News reports that one of the signs that NVIDIA would be providing GPUs for Apple being pointed to is a simple graphic on the NVIDIA site that some see as a MacBook design possibility. It's easy enough to see a foreign maker of accessories for the iPod leaking Apple designs by unveiling cases too early, but it would be hard to see NVIDIA make that sort of mistake.

Odds are the image is nothing more than a stock graphic the NVIDIA web designer placed on the site. An even more likely scenario has Apple updating the NVIDIA GPUs used in its MacBook Pro notebooks.



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RE: The only chipset I ever had trouble with...
By Motoman on 10/9/2008 5:19:03 PM , Rating: 2
Nope. Never had issues with Via chipsets, which led me to believe that reports of their instability were greatly exaggerated.

On the other hand, I had horrible results with Creative sound cards often enough to come to the conclusion that reports of their awesomeness were greatly exaggerated.


By Cypherdude1 on 10/10/2008 3:25:45 PM , Rating: 2
You've never had any problems with nVidia's 750, 780, and 790 chipsets? I've been reading threads, some of them with over 1700 replies such as on eVGA's forum:
http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.asp?m=253891&mpage=5...

which rant about the nVidia 700 series "artifact" and crashing problem. nVidia's 700 series also have other stability problems which make me shy away from their chipset and go for Intel's X48 or their next memory controller-less chipset. While I am eagerly waiting for Intel's next gen CPU with built-in memory controller, Asus's X48-based P5E64 WS Evolution with 4 PCIe x16 (2 run @PCIe x4) slots is a very nice mobo:
http://www.asus.com/products.aspx?l1=3&l2=11&l3=64...

BTW, GigaByte will be making a mobo with 4 x16 slots for Intel's next-gen CPU with built-in RAM controller.

quote:
I had horrible results with Creative sound cards often enough...

You've had problems with the Creative's X-Fi series? I'm sorry to hear that. I always thought the X-Fi series were the best, especially their top-of-the-line $300 card with external box.

I have a Hercules GTXP with external box which I purchased in 2002 and it works pretty good. The drivers are very stable. However, while the S/N ratio is pretty good, about 85 dB, I suspect the frequency response is not a full 20Hz-20KHz. It's probably about 40Hz-19KHz. Also, the 10-band equalizer, which is built into the sound chip, only works on the first (front) channel. I know from other owners Creative's X-Fi series 10-band equalizer works on all channels.

Because I play music and DVD's (ported via s-video to TV) using my computer, these specs are important to me. I do not play games anymore. PC-makers don't seem to think a hardware 10-band equalizer is important, but it is. Using a software-based 10-band equalizer is not an option because of the lag and higher CPU usage.


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