backtop


Print 104 comment(s) - last by clovell.. on Sep 26 at 11:19 AM


Chrysler's all-electric sports car  (Source: Detroit Free Press)

Chrysler Vice-Chairman Tom Lasorda unveils the new models
New all-electric sports car leads the pack.

While GM has generated a media frenzy over its upcoming release of the Volt plug-in hybrid, and even Ford is getting in on the act, little has been heard from Chrysler. That's all changed now, as the smallest of the US Big Three today announced plans to release three electric vehicles, including a totally new all-electric sports car. One of the three models will be on sale as early as 2010.

Chrysler unveiled an "electric range-extended" versions of their Town and Country minivan, as well as their iconic Jeep Wrangler. Both models will be plug-in hybrid variants. The automaker says each will have a 40 mile range on electric-only drive, at which time the gasoline engine will kick in.

This range is identical to GM's Volt, which should come as little surprise, given Chrysler has been working with A123 Systems, the same Lithium-Ion battery supplier GM reputedly will use for the Volt. Chrysler has not announced an official supplier yet, however, and says they are "working with multiple suppliers" on potential sources for batteries.

Tom LaSorda, Vice-Chairman for Chrysler, said the new models have been in the works for nearly two years. According to LaSorda, Chrysler's strategy is radically different than GM's. "We said we’ll take something more bold on the electric — all electric."

LaSorda said, "we didn’t want to spend the time on developing an all new platform, an all new car and then an all new propulsion system. We said we’ve got two icons for our company, a Wrangler, which is the icon for the Jeep brand, and the minivan, there’s 11 million-plus which we’ve sold. And people would say, ‘My god, they brought green to a minivan and Wrangler, this is unbelievable."

The most interesting of the new models, perhaps, is the new all-electric Dodge sportscar, capable of a 0-60 acceleration time of under 5 seconds. The vehicle's range will be 150-200 miles and will have a charging time of 6-8 hours on a standard 110v outlet. The vehicle will also accept a 220v supply, which will cut charging times in half.

No name or price was given for the sports car.

Chrysler has been hit hard by poor sales due to high gasoline prices. The automaker's sales have been down more than 20% in 2008-- a value double the industry average.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Where are the diesel hybrids?
By guacamojo on 9/24/2008 11:16:28 AM , Rating: 5
There are quite a few reasons why the fuel economy doesn't scale. Here are some:

Rolling resistance-
Trains have steel wheels rolling on steel tracks. Even the best "low rolling resistance" tires don't really compare that well to steel-on-steel.

Aerodynamic drag-
Train cars are close enough together that each car can "draft" behind the car in front of it. This gives pretty huge aero benefits to the train considered as a whole, even though each car may not be that streamlined.

Constant speed operation-
Freight trains don't accelerate fast. They also don't do a whole lot of stop-and-go cycles (compared with cars.) So they don't waste a whole bunch of fuel (or burn through a lot of brakes) accelerating their mass, they only spend what they need to do the work of climbing grades and overcoming drag and friction.

Consider a freight train that takes minutes to get to 60 mph. Would you accept that in a car?

Overall, although turbo-diesel engines tuned for constant speed operation are relatively efficient, they're not the reason that freight rail is so efficient.


"Intel is investing heavily (think gazillions of dollars and bazillions of engineering man hours) in resources to create an Intel host controllers spec in order to speed time to market of the USB 3.0 technology." -- Intel blogger Nick Knupffer

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki