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Adobe Systems CEO Shantanu Narayen  (Source: Stephen Shankland/CNET News)
New Photoshop CS4 to ship in October and use the power of the GPU

GPU makers have been busy convincing consumers that the GPU is able to do more than just visually enhance video games. NVIDIA announced its CUDA architecture that allows all sorts of applications to run on the GPU rather than the CPU. Performance for things like video rendering and computation are much faster when using the GPU.

The problem for NVIDIA with the push for people to try these other applications has been that the applications that would run on the GPU were not the programs most people wanted to use. The lack of a name brand application has changed now with Adobe announcing that the latest version of Photoshop, CS4, will take advantage of the power offered by the GPU for the first time.

Adobe will use the GPU to allow more fluidity in zooming in and out on an image, rotating the canvas, and displaying and manipulating 3D objects. CS4 will also use the GPU to handle color correction.

John Nack, product manager for Photoshop told CNET News, "It's not lost on us that when you look at the rate of GPU power advancement, there's an enormous wealth of cycles we can take advantage of now. The rate of price drop and performance gain has been off the charts."

Not all features and functions of Photoshop CS4 can take advantage of the power offered by the GPU according to Adobe. A feature that will take advantage of the GPU processing power called Pixel Bender didn’t make the final version of Photoshop CS4, but will likely be offered as a free download at a later date through Adobe Labs. The feature allows users to create their own special effects quickly.

Nack also said, "Typically, when folks were building a big Photoshop rig...we never had to really concern ourselves with things like which video driver they were using. We had a very light integration. Anything was fine. Now that we're doing actual processing on the GPU, we have to be a good deal more stringent."

Adobe Photoshop CS4 will be available in October for $699 for Photoshop CS4, $999 for the extended version and $199 for those upgrading Photoshop from previous versions.



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RE: Woo Hoo!!
By Spivonious on 9/23/2008 3:39:50 PM , Rating: 2
The really annoying thing is that there's no 64-bit version of Silverlight. It's like Microsoft's teams just go off and do their own thing and don't communicate with each other.


RE: Woo Hoo!!
By ebakke on 9/23/2008 5:44:10 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
It's like Microsoft's teams just go off and do their own thing and don't communicate with each other.

That's likely exactly what happens.


RE: Woo Hoo!!
By Tsuwamono on 9/23/2008 9:24:45 PM , Rating: 4
Microsoft Employee 1: "Did you hear we are coming out with Windows 7 soon?"

Microsoft Employee 2: "Where did you hear that?"

Microsoft Employee 1: "DailyTech"

Microsoft Employee 2: "Ya but watch them screw it up like they did Vista"


RE: Woo Hoo!!
By xsilver on 9/24/2008 10:37:46 AM , Rating: 1
continued:
Employee 1: "Wasnt that your department?"
Employee 2: "I thought it was yours?"
Employee 1: "I'm working on SP4 for winxp"
Employee 2: "Dont look at me - Im trying to write jokes for jerry seinfeld" :)


RE: Woo Hoo!!
By gamerk2 on 9/24/2008 8:46:53 AM , Rating: 2
Why do we need 64-bit versions? Programs should be written to work regardless of the maximum amount of address space, period.

Having seperate versions for every program leads to a decrease in product quality, and an increase in development time. 32-bit is still the most widley used, so make the programs 32-bit, but able to run on 64+-bit machines.


RE: Woo Hoo!!
By Spivonious on 9/24/2008 9:41:04 AM , Rating: 2
Because 32-bit plug-ins don't work in 64-bit browsers.

I forget where I read it, but something like 20% of users are now running 64-bit OSes. That's a huge chunk to ignore.


RE: Woo Hoo!!
By deadrats on 9/24/2008 8:43:38 PM , Rating: 2
because the cpu's are 64 bit (or more accurately hybrid 32/64/128 bit, SSE is 128 bit, on x86-64 architectures); furthermore, the transition from 32 bit to 64 bit cpu's brought us 16 additional registers (8 general purpose and 8 SIMD) on 64 bit cpu's as compared to 32 bit x86 cpu's.

what you should be asking is why are we still stuck with 32 bit OSes and 32 bit applications when the x86 architecture has moved to a 64 bit capable world.

if you have any doubts as to the benefit of 64 bit applications, download and install (on a spare hdd) a 32 bit and a 64 bit linux distro, say the latest fedora, where all the included apps are also compiled in 64 bit and then you will see why we should be demanding 64bit apps on 64bit OSes exclusively.


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