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AMD is aiming for markets looking for more performance than the Intel Atom

AMD is hard at work introducing new processors to try to capture market share from Intel. Earlier this week, slides showing some new AMD processors coming this year surfaced. Among the new processors on the slide was a line AMD is calling Ultra-Value Client (UVC).

The UVC processors will be available through OEMs only. More information on the line of UVC processors has now surfaced at CHW.net. The new slides show that the UVC processors are intended to allow OEMs to produce new computers in form factors optimized for emerging markets and basic PC usage.

AMD does specify that the UVC products are aimed at more than the netbook market and can deliver traditional PC performance. The UVC processors are intended to be paired with AMD's 690 and 740 chipsets for high-quality visuals.

All UVC parts will use AMD's standard socket AM2 and S1g1 notebook infrastructures. The UVC processors include the AMD Athlon X2 3250e with a 22W TDP and operating at 1.5GHz. It features a 1MB L2 cache and is planned to be available in Q4 2008.

The AMD Athlon 2650e has a 15W TDP and operates at 1.6GHz with 512KB cache. The 2650e is available now. According to AMD slides, it is positioning both the Athlon X2 3250e and Athlon 2650e above the Intel Atom DT 230 processor in performance.

These processors may become attractive to netbook makers looking for an alternative to Intel's Atom parts because of the current shortages of Atom parts from Intel. It is important to note that the AMD processors use more power than Intel's Atom. AMD is betting some users and OEMs will be willing to sacrifice battery life for improved performance.



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Apples to Oranges
By EvanaTm on 9/10/2008 3:22:02 PM , Rating: -1
How can anyone even consider these in the same class?

Intel is targeting sub 4W for the processor at 100% load.
AMD's answer is something that is 5x as power hungry.




RE: Apples to Oranges
By RussianSensation on 9/10/2008 4:55:51 PM , Rating: 3
No it's not. AMD processors have an onboard memory controller thus not requiring the northbridge. Once you add the power consumption of Intel's northbridge your claim of 4W power consumption for the cpu vs. 15W for AMD's processor is no longer relevant when comparing platform power consumption.


RE: Apples to Oranges
By bruce24 on 9/10/2008 9:17:37 PM , Rating: 1
> AMD processors have an onboard memory controller thus not
> requiring the northbridge. Once you add the power
> consumption of Intel's northbridge your claim of 4W power
> consumption for the cpu vs. 15W for AMD's processor is no
> longer relevant when comparing platform power consumption.

Yes AMD's processor has the memory controller, but with AMD's platform you still require a northbrdge chip, while it doesn't have the memory controller, there is more to the northbridge than just the memory controller.

And by the way, the 945 northbridge that is paired with Atom based notebooks is rated at 7 Watts Max TDP, that include both the memory controller and the gpu.

http://ark.intel.com/chipset.aspx?familyID=30439


RE: Apples to Oranges
By rudolphna on 9/10/2008 9:36:52 PM , Rating: 2
No its not. Actually, its rated at 22 Watts. Even the newest of Intel and AMD chips are not rated for 7 watts, that site is wrooong.


RE: Apples to Oranges
By bruce24 on 9/11/2008 9:31:17 AM , Rating: 3
> No its not. Actually, its rated at 22 Watts. Even
> the newest of Intel and AMD chips are not rated for 7
> watts, that site is wrooong.

I'll take Intel word over yours. If you go to the Intel website ark.intel.com, you will desktop version of the 945 northbridge is rated at 22.2W, while the mobile version, as the link I provided shows is rated at 7W.


RE: Apples to Oranges
By Penti on 9/11/2008 2:04:28 PM , Rating: 3
All I can say about AMDs chipsets power is that.

690G had a TDP of 8W and SB600 had a TDP of 4W.

Not much more then Intels 7W + 3.3W. 780G though has been shown idling at very low power. So on the desktops the AMD solution will use less power. As they don't have any lower power versions for the mobile platform, but Intel has a higher power for the desktop.


RE: Apples to Oranges
By foolsgambit11 on 9/11/2008 3:54:13 PM , Rating: 2
Yes. If you go to that site, it does have a 7W TDP processor listed for the 945 mobile chipset. And if you look at the list of approved processors, guess what processor you won't find on that list?

UP AND AT THEM!

In other words, you won't be finding this chipset paired with Atom in notebooks.

http://www.intel.com/products/processor/atom/

This gives you the two approved chipsets for Atom. They're the 945GSE (for Netbooks) and the 945GC (for Nettops).

http://ark.intel.com/chipset.aspx?familyID=35553

There's the page for the 945GSE Express. 6W TDP. As for the 945GC, I can't seem to find a product page for it. But I'm willing to bet it's in the 22W range people have been quoting (I mean, I doubt they're totally misinformed, just misguided).

So then you can add on the ICH for the 945GSE, which has as TDP of 3.3W (http://ark.intel.com/product.aspx?id=27680). That tallies up to a total draw, including an Atom 230 (4.0 W), 945GSE (6 W), and ICH (3.3 W) of 13.3 Watts. Max.

So the AMD offering comes in above the total CPU, north and south bridge combination for netbooks with Atom.

Granted, AMD's offering will probably outperform Atom for that extra wattage, but I thought I'd help set the TDP record straight.

Ha! Bet you thought this post was antagonistic, eh?


RE: Apples to Oranges
By Penti on 9/11/2008 1:19:10 PM , Rating: 2
It's more then just an IMC (memory controller) on die, they also did move other NB logic such as registers. It's normally the Southbridge that's connected to the BIOS and other LPC / Super I/O stuff. So you can technically build a AMD64 system without any external NB or NB Logic. Servers have done it. But a southbridge or other logic with an LPC / BIOS interface is needed. Thus the SB is more important in the AMD64 system.

But for the most time AMD64 systems means you need to use both a NB (PCI-E, Hypertransport) and a SB. Both use power of course. The 780G has shown using very little power during idle. So I'm sure they can make the 740G use little power too.


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