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Nehalem's new Turbo Mode is similar to the 386's turbo button, in that it provides more power to the CPU. On a whole, it saves power and delivers superior performance in single and dual core applications.  (Source: Techgage)

Intel's new on-die memory controller features three channels, and appears to be working superbly as it more than triples Penryn's bandwidth. The final picture should become clear with latency information arrives.  (Source: Techgage)
There's a lot of new stuff going under the hood of Intel's upcoming "Nehalem" processor

Intel's plans for the next four years were leaked a bit prematurely before its Intel Developers Forum (IDF) this month.  Now with the IDF in full swing, Intel is releasing many more interesting details on the upcoming processor that is on top of its list -- Nehalem.

Formally known as the Intel Core i7, Nehalem features eight logical cores, the return of HyperThreading, on die memory support, QuickPath, and more.  It will launch later in 2008.

One interesting revelation which Intel left off with was that it would probably release its notebook processors at almost the same time as its desktop variants, unlike with its Penryn processors.  It expects many of the power-saving technologies found in Nehalem to be very useful in preserving laptop battery life.

The first intriguing technical detail of Nehalem according to Techgage is the new "Turbo Mode".  Similar to the Turbo button of 386 days of yore, the turbo functionality will up the power to the CPU.  Overall performance will be reduced in Nehalem to save power.  For example, three cores of a four-core Nehalem processor could be turned off while a system is idle. More power can be transferred to that single core as well when performing simple operations that don’t require four cores blazing away.

However, if more CPU power is needed, power can be distributed to the remaining cores.  Turbo Mode can be turned off in the BIOS and does not replace traditional overclocking.

Also discussed was Intel's new on-chip memory controller.  It uses three channels in an unusual approach.  The approach is apparently paying off as memory bandwidth with its QuickPath Interface (QPI) is up to 25.6 GB/s, almost 3.5x the performance of current gen memory.  Unfortunately, Intel refused to divulge latency information, so the memory picture is still incomplete, though it’s looking bright on the bandwidth side of things.

As Nehalem samples have been show capable of working with even the highest end DDR3, DDR3-2000, many are now beginning to wonder whether such high speeds will even be necessary given the massive bandwidth.  Some are speculating that Nehalem's impressive memory performance will spell death for the high end memory market, already hurt by sinking prices.

It’s hard to say whether this will happen as increasingly there will be scenarios that call for massive memory use.  Intel is making big claims about its bandwidth, however.  According to Intel one stick of DDR3 on and Intel X58 motherboard with a Nehalem nearly equals the bandwidth of a dual-channel DDR3 configuration with a Penryn processor.  Nonetheless, memory manufacturers are planning to release 3 GB DDR3 kits to coincide with Nehalem for 32-bit OS's and 6 GB and 12 GB kits for 64-bit OS's.

While IDF attendees were sworn to secrecy on performance specifics, they did say that the overall performance shows good gains, similar to the Penryn.  They say that HyperThreading features few surprises and aside from some minor improvements is virtually identical to that used in the Pentium 4.

In conclusion, there are a few new juicy details on Nehalem, but in the end even more questions.  Fortunately answers will be coming in a few short months.  With AMD's Shanghai set to compete with Nehalem, perhaps the most interesting question of all is when will Nehalem's competitor materialize.



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Focus on Nehalems.....
By crystal clear on 8/21/2008 11:33:27 AM , Rating: 2
Now that we have Intel plans very crystal clear as mentioned below-

Of note was Gelsinger's revelation of the first eight-core Nehalem-EX silicon. The EX stands for expandable server market apparently and indicates that the chips will slot in large systems. Intel will sell these chips with 2, 4 or 8 cores and do a couple software threads per core.

The desktop - Core i7 - and standard server Nehalem chips will start arriving in the fourth quarter. Then the the EX server chips and additional desktop desktop (“Havendale” and “Lynnfield”) and mobile (“Auburndale” and “Clarksfield”) chips will appear in the second half of 2009.



http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/08/20/intel_neha...

Success of the i7 in the market place depends on Intel's ability to bring out a rock solid product without any major issues,like the types that plagued barcelona.

Success depends on Intel's ability to bring the product into the market in time,to enable Tier 1 OEMs to plan & execute their product offerings & get them into the market in time.

Pricing & Performance being the major determining factor in the end.

Get me to the market in time is the message.

AMD is in a very critical stage after the Barcelona disaster,eventually being punished severely in the form of market share,profit share,revenues etc.

They cannot afford a repeat with the Shanghai if it does not deliver on time,then AMD can say goodbye to whatever hopes & dreams it has to break even or return to profitability or increase it marketshare or revenues etc.

It will play havoc with its share prices & its very existance.

That reminds me Intel's acquistions in the past of VMware & Havoc has paid off by intergrating these technologies into Intel products namely Nehalems & Larrybee for a starter.

"You can get about 2x the performance out of VMware thanks to VT-d, which will be in the Nehalem chips."

Sorry to say that D.T. coverage of Intel's IDF is very poor & lacks the contents so desperately needed.

Even something basic like providing links to Intel's IDF press releases ,which gives the relevant contents accurately.

This is constructive criticism & should be taken ina postive manner.




RE: Focus on Nehalems.....
By crystal clear on 8/21/2008 12:39:00 PM , Rating: 2
Intel Senior Vice President Patrick Gelsinger told eWEEK at the Intel Developer Forum here.

One reason for this gradual rollout of Nehalem-based processors, Gelsinger said, is to allow OEMs to build new systems and allow for extensive testing and a long validation process for IT shops interested in the new processors.


“With Nehalem, it is more work for our customers and our OEM partners as they build up systems,” said Gelsinger. “We are on track for what we said, and when you have major new system designs, there is a longer validation cycle and a longer ramp into the marketplace.”

http://www.eweek.com/c/a/IT-Infrastructure/Intels-...


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