backtop


Print 104 comment(s) - last by kondor999.. on Aug 5 at 11:05 AM


Little is known about the new MacBook Pro except the case, shown here, which will feature a removable hard-drive battery compartment cover. Could Apple have secret plans up its sleeve?  (Source: Apple.pro)
Apple could be on the verge of shaking up its all-Intel CPU/chipset arrangement

Mention Apple in the tech community and one is sure to invoke a firestorm of criticism and debate.  Indeed few topics excite tech readers quite like the moves of Apple which tends to draw inordinately passionate praise and criticism.  However, one of the few moves that both critics and supporters alike seemed to agree was good news was "Mactel" -- Apple moving to adopt Intel processors and chipsets, starting in 2006.

Now it appears that the Mactel romance, which helped propel Apple to a modest marketshare and a third place spot in PC sales may be on the rocks, if new reports are to be believed.  While Apple will continue using the microprocessor giant's CPUs, a report from AppleInsider cites an inside source as saying that Apple will ditch Intel's chipsets in the new Apple computers that are scheduled to be announced in coming weeks.

Currently Apple uses the same Santa Rosa mobile platform that competitors Dell and HP use, just slightly tweaked for an OS X world.  However, according to the report, Apple believes that by moving away from Intel chipsets, it can set itself above the competition.  According to the reports the upcoming trio of Macbooks to be announced in several weeks will not feature the Montevina chipset, the chipset component of Intel's Centrino 2 platform.

What remains unspecific is what Apple plans to replace Intel's chipsets with.  One thing seems certain; whoever is making the new chipset is going to need an Intel licensing agreement, which could lead to an awkward situation for Apple.  One line of thinking is that Apple may revert to developing its own proprietary chipset as it did in the PowerPC days.  These thinkers point to Apple's acquisition of chipset company P.A. Semi.  However, Apple has previously insisted that this acquisition is purely to drive iPhone and iPod Touch chipset efforts.

Others believe that the new systems will feature NVIDIA or VIA chipsets, which would solve the licensing problems and could likely prove more full-featured than Intel's designs.  Many are hopeful that Apple will adopt this approach. 

It appears that a couple factors may be driving Apple's possible departure from Intel chipsets.  One is power consumption.  Intel's integrated graphics and chipset offerings are overly power hungry according to some analysts.  Another factor is unique capability -- Apple may be looking for unique features that Intel cannot provide it.

The reports could have something to do with Apple chief financial officer Peter Oppenheimer's comments during a conference call in which he stated boldly that Apple will be unveiling new technologies that will hurt its profit margins but send competitors reeling.  Said Mr. Oppenheimer, "We have some investments in front of us that I can’t discuss with you today where we’re going to be delivering state of the art new products that our competitors just aren’t going to be able to match and as a result, I would see gross margins being about 30 percent and that’s – that’s all I can tell you at this point." 

The comments echo allusions made by Apple CEO Steve Jobs recently that Apple will soon be revealing game-changing new products.  Both executives’ comments are out of character for Apple which has built a reputation for secrecy.

The official word from Apple and whatever it has up its sleeve is expected to coincide with the announcement of the new MacBooks which is coming in 6 to 8 weeks.  The new MacBooks are expected to release in time for the back-to-school shopping rush.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By nizanh on 7/30/2008 9:29:07 AM , Rating: 5
Apple business focus isn't on chip design. Apple don't have chip manufacturing facilities. Intel has to update it chipsets once or twice a year. It is hard to see how Apple with its tiny market share can justify investment in chipset development .




RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By omnicronx on 7/30/2008 9:44:23 AM , Rating: 5
I totally agree, I don't see how Apple is going to get anything better from the likes of Nvidia, AMD, or VIA. Maybe Apple is just getting a little scared that people are going to realize that when you buy a Mac, you are paying for the shiny casing and the OS, as everything else is essentially a PC. What better way than proprietary hardware to keep clones and the naysayers away.

Do I think its a good idea? Hell NO! Apple should stay where they belong, and that's not in actual development of hardware.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By othercents on 7/30/2008 11:48:47 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Apple should stay where they belong, and that's not in actual development of hardware.

Then were do they belong? Apple has always been a hardware company since the beginning when they designed the first apple computer. Where they have lacked until recently was the software side. Now with the advances in the iPhone and OSX they are doing well on the software front, but why give up on the hardware side?

If they want to get licensing and build a chipset they should do it. Granted if they don't use the Intel chipset I believe that they will buy their chipset from someone else. Maybe even from Nvidia or AMD to get an integrated solution with higher end graphic capability.

Other


By Oregonian2 on 7/31/2008 3:38:32 PM , Rating: 4
Their hardware (meaning "electrical"), per se, has never been outstanding. Their strengths have been in industrial design (looks, packaging, "mechanical excellence"), marketing, and in software. Their hardware (starting from the Apple I which I recall seeing back at the first computer show in Atlantic City long long ago) has been fairly run-of-the-mill. That said, a lot of their strength in software came from their making of their own hardware, not necessarily because it was super-good hardware, but that it was "captive" and a known entity unlike uSoft whose software had only vague outlines of what hardware it was to run on. Now, silicon design would be an entirely new business to get into. Generating custom lower-performance but niche-advantageous silicon seems likely. Anything that takes a fab-power contest is something they'd probably have trouble competing with, Intel #1 in the world doing that.


By StevoLincolnite on 7/30/2008 12:03:17 PM , Rating: 5
I actually hope they do go with Via, Via used to have rather bad Chipsets in the Socket 7 days (Remember the AGP issues?)
But since Intel tried to force Rambus down our throats Via has seemed like the Dude in Shiny Armor to me.

Plus This will give Via some more funds and be more competitive in the chipset Arena, and hopefully make some nice High-End AMD/Intel boards that will grab peoples attention and in the end, create more competition which leads to lower prices.


By theapparition on 7/30/2008 12:13:35 PM , Rating: 2
Ack! Via on Socket7........thought I had completely purged those nightmares, but you mentioning made me re-live some of those bad memories.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By erikejw on 7/31/2008 2:29:44 AM , Rating: 2
The only candidates are AMD/ATI and Nvidia since they are the only one with better integrated graphics which seems to be the main issue.

AMD have no Intel chipsets but Nvidia have.
To me it seems as it will be Nvidia who brings home the contract.

Even though their chipsets are very powerhungry and have other problems I can't see AMD design a chipset for the small Apple market, it would not make sense.


By kelmon on 7/31/2008 3:25:48 AM , Rating: 2
Indeed, the prediction appears to be nVidia:

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/08/07/30/coul...

Apparently nVidia have been developing their own mobile platform to work with the Core 2 Duo processor family that would provide substantially better graphics performance (not exactly shocking news) and equivalent features to the Intel chipsets. The silence from the company on this product is also taken as being a sign that they are working with Apple since "silence" might as well be the company motto.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By jonmcc33 on 7/30/2008 12:54:08 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
But since Intel tried to force Rambus down our throats Via has seemed like the Dude in Shiny Armor to me.


Where have you been the past few years? Intel gave up on Rambus years ago. They switched to DDR and were the first to switch to DDR2 and DDR3.

Via has gone downhill and only makes extreme budget chipsets. Most of their money comes from thin client systems now.

quote:
Plus This will give Via some more funds and be more competitive in the chipset Arena, and hopefully make some nice High-End AMD/Intel boards that will grab peoples attention and in the end, create more competition which leads to lower prices.


Via fell to nVIDIA and AMD/ATi for AMD chipsets. They never made a successful Intel chipset and can never compete in price/performance. I'd give up on these dreams of yours...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VIA_Technologies


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By Sulphademus on 7/30/2008 1:23:55 PM , Rating: 4
Maybe Apple needs a unique chipset so prevent any new Psystar's from popping up.

VIA may be down but I wouldnt count em out. They could come back with a decent chipset and it wouldnt surprize me.


By jonmcc33 on 7/30/2008 6:41:34 PM , Rating: 2
I wouldn't count on that...ever. Read the link.


By StevoLincolnite on 7/30/2008 3:27:07 PM , Rating: 2
I think *everyone* knows that Intel gave up on Rambus, I was reminiscing the past.

Basically VIA was the only decent choice at that time for the Intel Pentium 4 Platform.

quote:
Via fell to nVIDIA and AMD/ATi for AMD chipsets. They never made a successful Intel chipset and can never compete in price/performance. I'd give up on these dreams of yours...


I dunno, the VIA K8T800, VIA K8T800 PRO Boards was pretty rock solid, I had a K8T800 in my last AMD Build and it has been humming along perfectly fine for awhile.

There are other things than "Price/Performance" hows about Power Consumption/Features? or Form Factor/Availability?
Or Perhaps, I wanted one of there boards that I could drop a Pentium M into?

Perhaps you should give up on those dreams that everyone desires the same things as yourself.


By oab on 7/30/2008 6:17:53 PM , Rating: 2
Oh yes, teh K8T800, first Athlon 64 board I owned. That thing was solid as a rock.

Too bad for Via the nForce 4 came out and utterly beat them.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By jonmcc33 on 7/30/2008 8:33:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think *everyone* knows that Intel gave up on Rambus, I was reminiscing the past.

Basically VIA was the only decent choice at that time for the Intel Pentium 4 Platform.


Intel was going strong even during the Rambus days.

Not sure what you mean about VIA being the only decent choice. You're missing the Intel 815 chipset, which offered Pentium 4 with SDRAM. The 845 chipset moved to DDR with the 850 being the performance Rambus chipset. Then the 865PE and 875P were the last of the Socket 478 age and performance was amazing with those chipsets. You even had the SiS 655TX chipset.

VIA was never a strong Intel chipset manufacturer.

quote:
I dunno, the VIA K8T800, VIA K8T800 PRO Boards was pretty rock solid, I had a K8T800 in my last AMD Build and it has been humming along perfectly fine for awhile.


Failed behind a dominating nVIDIA reign for Socket 939 and even ATi's Crossfire chipsets.

quote:
Or Perhaps, I wanted one of there boards that I could drop a Pentium M into?

Perhaps you should give up on those dreams that everyone desires the same things as yourself.


Only done on Intel chipsets (Intel 915GM). Asus had the CT-479 adapter but that only worked on Asus motherboards with Intel chipsets (865PE, 875P and 915P).

I'm not the one dreaming here. Just being realistic.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By MonkeyPaw on 7/30/2008 9:53:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Not sure what you mean about VIA being the only decent choice. You're missing the Intel 815 chipset, which offered Pentium 4 with SDRAM.


I wouldn't say that anyone is missing that chipset, Bob. The P4 on SDRAM was the worst possible combo you could buy at the time. Performance was utterly terrible.

quote:
The 845 chipset moved to DDR with the 850 being the performance Rambus chipset.


The 845 showed up well after SiS proved that DDR could perform well on a P4 platform (look up the 645). Before that, everyone thought that Rambus was required to get the most from a P4 (especially since the 815 sucked so terribly). Via showed that DDR was the way to go for the Athlon. Intel reluctantly followed suit when Rambus fell into trouble.


By jonmcc33 on 7/30/2008 11:40:43 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Via showed that DDR was the way to go for the Athlon.


Actually, the first DDR chipsets for AMD showed no difference in performance over SDRAM. It wasn't until the KT266A that DDR showed some of it's shine. Then nVIDIA came out with the nForce chipset and introduced dual channel technology.

When Intel finally dumped Rambus they took that dual channel technology ahead by leaps and bounds (865PE, 875P) over anything AMD had.

Of course Intel is going to integrate the memory controller in the Nehalem core so I'm not sure where Apple thinks they are going to go.


By DM0407 on 7/31/2008 12:15:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I wouldn't say that anyone is missing that chipset, Bob.


An office space reference worked into an intel vs Via(of all things) argument.... Genius!


By StevoLincolnite on 7/31/2008 12:25:59 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Not sure what you mean about VIA being the only decent choice. You're missing the Intel 815 chipset, which offered Pentium 4 with SDRAM. The 845 chipset moved to DDR with the 850 being the performance Rambus chipset. Then the 865PE and 875P were the last of the Socket 478 age and performance was amazing with those chipsets. You even had the SiS 655TX chipset.


You must not know your History on Chipsets to well, Via Released A Chipset for the Pentium 4 with SD-Ram Support, Intel had NO Chipsets with SDRAM or DDR Ram, Only Rambus Memory which was insanely expensive.

THAT gave Via a huge edge of Intel at the time.
*Nocks it into his head*

quote:
Failed behind a dominating nVIDIA reign for Socket 939 and even ATi's Crossfire chipsets.


For awhile they were putting up a good fight, ATI Wasn't even in the picture at the time, So I'm not entirely sure why you added them in as a reference...
But yes Ultimately they were outclassed in the end, But during the nForce 1 and 2 days, Via was a force to be reckoned with. (nForce 1 was horrible, Much like nForce 3 in my opinion).

Only done on Intel chipsets (Intel 915GM). Asus had the CT-479 adapter but that only worked on Asus motherboards with Intel chipsets (865PE, 875P and 915P).

Do you remember a small Device that would slot into socket 370 boards? That Essentially Gave Older Socket 370 Boards support for the Tualatin? Think something similar.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By jonmcc33 on 7/31/2008 8:00:23 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
You must not know your History on Chipsets to well, Via Released A Chipset for the Pentium 4 with SD-Ram Support, Intel had NO Chipsets with SDRAM or DDR Ram, Only Rambus Memory which was insanely expensive.


VIA has had licensing issues with Intel for the longest time and because of that no OEM would touch a VIA chipset for Intel. Not sure about you but OEM's like Dell, HP, etc sell the most computers.

What edge do you think was ever there if no major OEM would touch it?

quote:
For awhile they were putting up a good fight, ATI Wasn't even in the picture at the time, So I'm not entirely sure why you added them in as a reference...


Because when the CrossFire chipset came out it was a huge seller, more so than anything VIA had to offer. Even AnandTech gave the A8R-MVP rave ratings.

The VIA K8 series were Socket 939. ATi was definitely in the picture at the time. The CrossFire chipset came out at the end of 2005. I don't think you are following quotes nor conversations very well.

quote:
Do you remember a small Device that would slot into socket 370 boards? That Essentially Gave Older Socket 370 Boards support for the Tualatin? Think something similar.


What? The Pentium M used the Banias and Dothan cores. Tualatin was a Pentium III. Are you okay here? Not moving along in your conversations very well are you?


By StevoLincolnite on 7/31/2008 8:36:11 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
VIA has had licensing issues with Intel for the longest time and because of that no OEM would touch a VIA chipset for Intel. Not sure about you but OEM's like Dell, HP, etc sell the most computers. What edge do you think was ever there if no major OEM would touch it?


Wrong, at that time OEM's WERE choosing Via, because the SD RAM gave higher profit Marjins over RDRAM equipped systems.

Besides, nVidia cannot even touch Intel Chipsets in terms of sales.

quote:
Because when the CrossFire chipset came out it was a huge seller, more so than anything VIA had to offer. Even AnandTech gave the A8R-MVP rave ratings. The VIA K8 series were Socket 939. ATi was definitely in the picture at the time. The CrossFire chipset came out at the end of 2005. I don't think you are following quotes nor conversations very well.


You do realize this happened many years after the Via Chipsets that I mentioned were released? Making this pointless.

The K8 Series originally began on Socket 754.

quote:
What? The Pentium M used the Banias and Dothan cores. Tualatin was a Pentium III. Are you okay here? Not moving along in your conversations very well are you?


Again it flew over your head, and this has just become pointless.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By Googer on 7/31/2008 3:47:30 PM , Rating: 2
jonmcc33 -
quote:
You're missing the Intel 815 chipset, which offered Pentium 4 with SDRAM.

Wrong

The 815 Chipsets were for Socket 370 PIII Tualatin CPUs running PC133. The Intel 820 chipset was for RAMBUS ram with a Pentium 3; the 820 was discontinued and recalled. The Intel 850 was the Rambus Chipset for Pentium 4.

VIA K8T800 chipsets were known to be ROCK SOLID Stable, not necessarily the fastest ever made; but the one of the very first for AMD Athlon 64 and managed to maintain decent performance.


By jonmcc33 on 7/31/2008 6:06:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The Intel 850 was the Rambus Chipset for Pentium 4.


When did I say it wasn't? It was the performance chipset for the longest time for Intel. Even bested by the 850E. It wasn't until the 865PE and 875P with dual channel DDR that moved Intel past Rambus for good.

quote:
VIA K8T800 chipsets were known to be ROCK SOLID Stable, not necessarily the fastest ever made; but the one of the very first for AMD Athlon 64 and managed to maintain decent performance.


Okay, and they still didn't sell much of them. nVIDIA dominated AMD chipsets. Even the ATi CrossFire chipset bested anything VIA had to offer.

Not sure why we're still going on and on about VIA. They are in the past for PC motherboard chipsets. They only make audio chipsets and thin client systems these days. Also making a name for themselves with ITX systems.

http://pcper.com/article.php?aid=597

But that's all you can expect out of them. This while Apple thing is crazy talk.


By boogle on 8/1/2008 3:06:39 PM , Rating: 2
There were plenty of chipsets around for Intel: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_chipset...

E7205 was the first enthusiast chipset with dual channel DDR for P4, and it came out November 2002. 875P followed on in April 2003.

I know E7205 implies it's a workstation chipset, and it kinda was. However, it found its way into enthusiast boards like the Asus P4G8X.

VIA has never been a decent choice for the P4, they didn't have a license and so had to use reverse-engineering to make their chipsets. SiS and ULi/Ali were the only 'rivals' to Intel at the time.


By kondor999 on 8/5/2008 11:05:12 AM , Rating: 1
I totally agree. Anyone here remember VIA drivers?

Intel chipsets were a godsend for those of us stuck in BSOD Hell.

I *still* remember VIA "3-in-1" drivers. What does that tell you?

Maybe that I spent way too much time re-downloading, re-installing, and toying with the idea of eating a gun.

Say what you will about Intel. Their shit works.


By sprockkets on 7/30/2008 3:07:46 PM , Rating: 2
But they love those apple logos on all their hardware they don't make.

In any case, if they do go from Intel to other chipsets, expect the same crap with drivers that Windows people put up with. No, it is not as bad as the old days, but no one does better chipsets than Intel for Intel processors.

Even then, who is available? nVidia? AMD is symbolically barred from Intel stuff nowadays.


By winterspan on 7/31/2008 3:09:14 AM , Rating: 2
HA, considering Apple co-created the ARM architecture, and did much of the work on PowerPC themselves, not to mention purchasing PA SEMI recently.

Apple already had been only using part of Intel's Centrino. While Intel's mobile chipset just now got Gigabit ethernet, it's been available on Apple laptops since the very first Intel Macs. I don't think anyone really knows what they are doing though, and nVidia is the only 3rd party company that licenses Intel's mobile processor sockets, and that relationship only started very recently. I personally believe Apple is going to be building their own chipsets and integrated much better graphics technology from nVidia or ATI to replace Intel's GMA crap.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By Misty Dingos on 7/30/08, Rating: 0
RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By kelmon on 7/30/2008 10:16:14 AM , Rating: 1
You know, the first sentence was probably correct but after that you started rambling about coffee and bird cages. Are you feeling OK?

I can't see Apple making their own chipsets. I also don't see what they are going to gain from someone else that is going to make sacrificing Intel's economies of scale worthwhile. This rumor could well turn out to be false but then the question still remains of what the transition mentioned is actually going to be.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By h0kiez on 7/30/2008 10:52:15 AM , Rating: 2
Don't feed the trolls. At least he was funny...


By Master Kenobi (blog) on 7/30/2008 11:49:01 AM , Rating: 4
I thought the Starbucks comment was spot on.


By jconan on 8/1/2008 3:58:57 AM , Rating: 2
I think Snow Leopard Apple's issue because it incorporates OpenCL that uses GPU for processing similar to Microsoft's upcoming DirectX 11. For Apple to be able to utilize OpenCL they need a chipset that has a contemporary gpu capabilities for OpenCL to work. Intels weak IGP doesn't really help out Apple's OpenCL.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By paydirt on 7/30/08, Rating: 0
RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By swbsam on 7/30/08, Rating: -1
RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By jonmcc33 on 7/30/08, Rating: 0
RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By swbsam on 7/30/2008 1:46:18 PM , Rating: 2
I have a $600 pc laptop that works fine, but i SO miss the two finger scroll.. I'm constantly doing that and realizing that I'm on the cheapy :)


By MamiyaOtaru on 7/31/2008 1:33:29 AM , Rating: 2
and my $430 eee 900 does that just fine :)


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By lantzn on 7/30/2008 5:02:59 PM , Rating: 2
OK here are the specs.
http://www.apple.com/macbook/specs.html

Show me the laptop that cost "hundreds" less with exactly or close to the same specs. You must include all hardware AND bundled software.


By Penti on 7/30/2008 7:39:01 PM , Rating: 2
Well you can't really. You can not get for example a C2D 13.3" Sony Vaio for less.

But you can get a similar 13.3" C2D computer from FSC, DELL and Asus (and more) for the same money or even less depending on configuration. Like the Fujitsu Siemens Amilo Si2636 that can be had for less or DELL XPS M1330 that can be had for the same or less. The DELL XPS M1330 with 2.4GHz, 2GB, 160GB, Bluetooth, X3100, 6 Cell (56Wh) battery, VHP, Wireless N and a DVD burner cost $1,198 and for an extra $99 you can get photoshop- and premiere elements if you would want a iLife replacement. A FSC Amilo Si2636 isn't available in the US though, the fujitsu brand doesn't carry the Amilo-series there.

But if one moves outside the 13.3" screens there are plenty of 12.x" up to 14.1" alternatives. Asus also carries several 13.3" alternatives to the macbook. Such as the F6A-A1 (C2D 2.0GHz, 3GB) for $999 (on Newegg). But that's not so unexpected as they manufacture some of the macbooks. On the DELL you can add a 8400M GS for $100 also, and there are plenty of alternatives for C2D <15" computers. The Apple has good value though. Sure they could make one that's 200 bucks cheaper. But they don't like too have to many products. There's no point competing against a $600 Vista laptop as you have to pay for quality and battery life. Computers like the FSC U9200 (12"er in Europe) can be had much cheaper but a good config will just cost 200-300 less then the macbook. If you can save money for the U9200 i guess you could for the macbook too without to much problem. If your going to be legal you'd have to pay hundreds of dollars for software for the U9200 anyways.


By jonmcc33 on 7/30/2008 8:47:53 PM , Rating: 5
$1099 Apple MacBook (base)
2.1GHz Core 2 Duo
1GB DDR2
120GB HDD
GMA 3100

$899 Dell Studio 15 (configured)
2.0GHz Core 2 Duo
3GB DDR2
250GB HDD
256MB ATI Mobility Radeon HD 3450

Now, to get equal to that Studio 15 you need to configure the MacBook to this:

$1549 Apple MacBook (configured)
2.1GHz Core 2 Duo
4GB DDR2
250GB HDD
GMA 3100

Sorry, I know it's not fair but you have to be equal. Looks to me like you save $650 by getting the Dell with Windows Vista. It's just plain math. I won't even mention warranty. Does the MacBook come with one or is it extra?


By napalmjack on 7/30/2008 1:51:52 PM , Rating: 2
Better make damn sure to buy that extended warranty, lest we forget the troubled iBook days!


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By swbsam on 7/30/2008 11:28:56 AM , Rating: 5
You Second Life playing, Walmart clothes wearing, eternally single dorks are another cliche/stereotype and probably a bit accurate, since zealots on either side of the issue seem to need to get out more.

Computers are tools, why take it all so personal? I've gone from 100% PC (xp, no vista for me) to 75% mac because my job requires me to edit video and audio. Now I see the benefits of both platforms and enjoy being bi, using Boot Camp.

Stop hating mac users, most of the arrogant ones are arrogant not because of the computer that they use but because they CAN afford the premium and are artistically minded, so they think a bit highly of themselves. It's not Apple, it's the audience apple caters too. You know, the coffee drinking "emo" queers who have far more interesting social lives than some of us.


By Complex Pants on 7/30/2008 12:07:57 PM , Rating: 2
Can someone answer this for me, why are current Mac any better at video or photo editing considering they use the same hardware as a PC? Back in the PowerPC days I could understand the difference, but these days what is the difference besides OS and software?


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By rudolphna on 7/30/2008 12:26:41 PM , Rating: 2
its the programs available on the platform. Mac has final Cut Pro, and Final Cut Express, imovie, and a much wider selection of QUALITY programs available. I dont use macs, but im interested in maybe getting a macbook for school, and bootcamping it with XP and Leopard.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By FITCamaro on 7/30/2008 1:02:45 PM , Rating: 2
Final Cut Pro is not the end all be all of video editing software. Adobe Premiere is quite good and available on Windows. And for the average user even Windows Movie Maker works just fine in a pinch as well.


By lantzn on 7/30/2008 5:08:27 PM , Rating: 2
Yes but while you might have Premiere on a PC, you can have BOTH on a Mac which gives you more options. Nowadays an Intel Mac can run ALL software titles at native speeds unlike with a PC.


By Penti on 7/30/2008 5:46:46 PM , Rating: 2
Well if they work at a place that's using FCP then they will be sitting with there macs. If they are professionals using Avid they might sit with both mac PCs and Windows PCs. Same with premiere. As editors don't just use there own stuff for editing but might sit at the places that are using them for there skills.

It's an great plattform for editing and multimedia and so are Windows. I agree that iMovie isn't something justifying choosing the mac plattform. They are plenty of choices for home user editing software for Windows. However not even Premiere Pro supports AVCHD which iMovie does. There are third-party solutions for it though.


By Clauzii on 7/30/2008 1:08:31 PM , Rating: 2
Please don't forget Garageband. A LOT of music today gets born in that single program.


By kelmon on 7/30/2008 12:39:15 PM , Rating: 2
I'm an Aperture junkie and you can't get that for Windows. Mind you, Adobe's Lightroom application will no doubt do for PC users, particularly since they've now bumped that up to v2.0 yesterday.

For me, at least, it has always been about the applications. Out-of-the-box, you can't go far wrong with the iLife software.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By swbsam on 7/30/2008 1:30:15 PM , Rating: 3
"Better" is completely relative, but I prefer Final Cut Pro to all of the PC apps that I've used (Premiere, Vegas (props to sony, I like the program), Avid, etc). I can use any of them, but working with Final Cut Pro is fairly intuitive, from start to finish.

Where FCP shines is workflow - I can edit and export without issues what so ever. On the PC end I had to figure out a lot of annoying things, from codec support to export settings. Sometimes I'd hook up a new camera on the PC and it wouldn't work. I'd dig and dig and find out about some weird firewire driver issue or about the app I'm using not support X, Y, or Z. I'm a nerd, so I figure it all out, but it takes time..

Final Cut Pro just works, I don't worry about codecs or export settings or anything secondary to getting my work done.

Also, why do most companies use MS Office when Open Office does all of the same stuff for free? MS Office has a history of support and relative stability while open office is still pretty new. Premiere has a history of sucking, until the very decent premiere pro came out. Fcp has made its way into the industry and now is a standard (along with avid). Does that make sense?


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By Alexstarfire on 7/30/2008 2:14:03 PM , Rating: 2
That's exactly how Macs have become popular, the intuitive programs, nothing more. If they ever ported them to PC then nothing would be different what-so-ever.

Anyways, I can't stand Macs. I've had to use my dad's mac several times, and while I've fairly avid at doing things on it it can still be a pain in the ass to find things. He got programs strewn across 3 hard drives and the go to "Applications" only takes you to one location. His iPhoto stuff is on a different HDD than most of his regular stuff.

I'm sure that if he only had 1 HDD that this wouldn't be a problem, but as he doesn't it's just a major pain to go find everything since there isn't 1 location that links all programs and such. Though, the same can be said for Windows, except that nearly everything gets a place in the Start Menu.

Sigh... there is always going to be a rift between the two worlds, so why bother trying to bridge it?


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By lantzn on 7/30/2008 5:19:47 PM , Rating: 2
One word, SPOTLIGHT.

1. Hold down the Apple(clover) key and then hit space bar.

2. In the upper right corner is a field to type in what you're looking for.

Done.

You can also click the little magnifying glass in the upper right corner and get the same thing. There's always 2 or 3 ways to achieve something on a Mac. Also the HELP Menu is really a good place for how tos.

Spotlight searches the metadata and can find things that are extremely buried, or content within the file, not just the name of the file.

You can also drag just about anything to the Dock for very quick access. Folders can be dragged to the right side of the Dock.


By Alexstarfire on 7/31/2008 12:24:38 AM , Rating: 2
That's not very useful when the pictures are a bunch of random letters and numbers. It's not like a camera, or phone, names pictures very well. They are all DSCMxxxx or something like that.

Anyways, my point wasn't that things can't be organized, just that my dad's computer is far from it. Might work for him and him alone, but that's it. Hell, with all the stuff I use quite a bit I just put it on the desktop.

Also, I do know how to use a Mac. We've had Macs in this house since pre OS 6.


By robinthakur on 7/31/2008 8:50:01 AM , Rating: 2
Yes and No. Macs are prevalent in the design world for mostly historical reasons when Photoshop was much better on a Mac and the fact that these users are rarely very technical, they just want to learn one way, and re-learning all the Photoshop shortcuts is a pain. All the colour calibration is also handled on a Mac much better and prominently in my experience which is absolutely phenominally important for print-based design. I learned how to use all of these programs on a Mac and therefore feel most comfotable with them in that environment. Therefore while I might use Photoshop on my PC at home I'm most efficient with it on my Mac. Performance wise there's very little in it these days.

Where you do have Mac only apps like Quark, Aperture, Final Cut they are industry leaders. If you are talking about a home market, then that's different as homogenous production environments become a non issue :)

Office 2007 is considerably better and more functional than Open Office for much the same reason. Show me the Sharepoint integration features in Open Office please and I might change my mind?

Macs succeed because they look slick and they are priced as luxury items. This necessarily limits their target audience without more budget models. The first thing I see when I look at anthing I'm buying is the design/look and then secondly the price. If Apple's marketing can make a product look absolutely world-bendingly fabulous, people are less likely to be turned away by the high price. The fact that they are so intuitive to use and have a better-for-the-consumer licensing model than Windows is not a major concern for most but is noted. The idea that a designer who creates beautiful things for a living would be happy with an ugly box with very little design involved sitting on or under their desk is a bit naive.


By hotel77 on 7/30/2008 12:40:09 PM , Rating: 5
You lost all the nerds at "Zealots", they started thinking about Starcraft strategies to counter.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By jonmcc33 on 7/30/2008 1:12:41 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
I've gone from 100% PC (xp, no vista for me) to 75% mac because...blah, blah


ROFL @ no Vista for you. Sort of naive aren't ya?

quote:
Stop hating mac users, most of the arrogant ones are arrogant not because of the computer that they use but because they CAN afford the premium and are artistically minded, so they think a bit highly of themselves.


Wow. Just wow. Not sure what owning a Mac has to do with artistic minds or what someone can afford. I grew up on art, even have my old portfolio, and I can afford a Mac without a problem.

The point is that the money I make is hard earned. I don't like throwing it away nor do I like paying twice for what something is actually worth. If that means I buy a pair of Levis jeans instead of some $200 designer brand when they are both as comfortable and last just as long then so be it. That doesn't mean I'm not "artistic minded" or cannot afford it because I'm "poor". It means I'm not mentally retarded when it comes to money. It doesn't grow on trees.


By swbsam on 7/30/2008 1:45:13 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Wow. Just wow. Not sure what owning a Mac has to do with artistic minds or what someone can afford. I grew up on art, even have my old portfolio, and I can afford a Mac without a problem.

The point is that the money I make is hard earned. I don't like throwing it away nor do I like paying twice for what something is actually worth. If that means I buy a pair of Levis jeans instead of some $200 designer brand when they are both as comfortable and last just as long then so be it. That doesn't mean I'm not "artistic minded" or cannot afford it because I'm "poor". It means I'm not mentally retarded when it comes to money. It doesn't grow on trees.


I've learned that people who use the term "wow.just wow" automatically win the nerd race, so I guess you've just proven my point ;)

All kidding aside, I hate wasting money too. But, taking video editing as an example, one instance when I found out that the firewire port built into my Dell wasn't compatible with xp SP 2 when combined with an HDV video camera took me about 2 days to remedy (plus cost of new hardware) - time is money, right? My client was annoyed and I was frustrated. I gave my then gf's (now wife) mac a try and it immediately recognized the camera and everything just worked..

As far as levi jeans vs. $200 jeans. I'm wearing pants that are way too short for me and a hideous green shirt with a blue tie, because I don't know sh*t about fashion and grabbed the first thing that didn't smell like cat piss... SOME mac people are obnoxious, style conscious "artists." Others are task oriented people, like myself, who like to get a job done as quickly and elegantly as possible.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By robinthakur on 7/31/2008 8:32:15 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
If that means I buy a pair of Levis jeans instead of some $200 designer brand when they are both as comfortable and last just as long then so be it


So you don't care what they look like? If everyone thought like that, we'd all walk round wearing velour lined sackcloth "cause its comfortable"


By jonmcc33 on 8/2/2008 6:08:18 PM , Rating: 2
I know that it's hard for you to grasp such simple concept like that.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By mmntech on 7/30/08, Rating: -1
RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By FITCamaro on 7/30/2008 1:04:31 PM , Rating: 2
Aero worked just fine on 945GM integrated graphics I can assure you. So I don't see how it would work poorly on newer integrated graphics. Aero is not that demanding.


By jonmcc33 on 7/30/2008 1:17:35 PM , Rating: 2
I agree. Works fine on Intel 3100 chipset and G35 too. More FUD being spread most likely.


By Dennis Travis on 7/30/2008 5:44:56 PM , Rating: 1
I have an Intel Mac Mini with a GMA950 Chipset. Vista FLYS on it. Aero is dead smooth and some friends who have seen my Mini run Vista asked where the hidden computer was. It's my laptop with an ATI 200 Graphics chipset that bogs with Aero. The Intel is smooth as silk.


RE: It is hard to see the logic of such a move
By jazkat on 7/30/2008 3:57:51 PM , Rating: 2
WHERE DO YOU GUYS THINK ALL THE PUMA PLATFORMS WENT.....

TAP TAP

I THINK APPLE ALSO HAS AN EYE FOR AMD'S FUSION..


By Yossarian22 on 7/30/2008 9:58:13 PM , Rating: 2
Fix your shift key


By rikmorgan on 7/30/2008 7:38:08 PM , Rating: 2
I'd bet on NVIDIA and Intel because the technology is moving in the direction of multiple cores and parallelization. I bet Apple will announce some automatic parallelizing xcore development tools that target the NVIDIA GPU.


nvidia chipsets
By bohhad on 7/30/2008 9:33:32 AM , Rating: 2
that would be interesting, i'd look into buying an nV-powered green apple. as long as you could get one with powerful enough graphics, still need to be able to play pc games




RE: nvidia chipsets
By FITCamaro on 7/30/2008 9:47:55 AM , Rating: 3
Well if the move was for power consumption, Nvidia is definitely the way NOT to go. Nvidia's chipsets are terrible in that aspect. ATI would be a far better choice.


RE: nvidia chipsets
By BladeVenom on 7/30/2008 11:44:57 AM , Rating: 2
ATI/AMD may have the best integrated graphics solution, but didn't they stop making chipsets for Intel processors?


RE: nvidia chipsets
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 7/30/2008 11:55:22 AM , Rating: 2
As of right now they are still making them, no word on if they will continue to make them for the next generation of Intel chips.


RE: nvidia chipsets
By Warren21 on 7/31/2008 1:43:32 AM , Rating: 2
The RS600 and RD600 were the last Intel chipsets developped by ATI, since being acquired by AMD in 2006 no more have been dev'd.


RE: nvidia chipsets
By quaiky on 8/5/2008 7:26:18 AM , Rating: 2
yes they stopped developing new intel northbridges. but i guess its not impossible to improve that existing design. ati allways used same southbridges for intel and amd platforms so they probably could use an existing southbridge.
so i really think that technically it would be no problem for amd to supply chipsets for apples intel platforms, the only question is if amd would do that (and here i think is the bigger problem).


RE: nvidia chipsets
By bohhad on 7/30/2008 2:20:32 PM , Rating: 2
myself being an ati/amd fanboy, i'd rather have seen an ati/amd apple, i just didnt think it would happen. but your right, it would be better, no doubt.


Game-changing?
By InternetGeek on 7/30/2008 9:30:39 AM , Rating: 4
Maybe Apple will sell cheap computers that can be upgraded or somehow tinkered with by the user. OCZ DIY notebooks anyone?

Maybe, building upon the iPhone, these new MacBooks have touch screens and a more involving (not demanding) interface. Microsoft Surface anyone?

It's possible they will release a series of SDKs and APIs that would make Apples a good platform to target for gaming, business and so by focusing the designs on the many different ways each market would use the laptop. Gaming: More controls or ways to connect controls, better sound, etc. Business: touch screen, etc. Blade runner anyone?

Ideas? I'm sure we can brainstorm some solid contenders here!




RE: Game-changing?
By vapore0n on 7/30/08, Rating: -1
RE: Game-changing?
By paydirt on 7/30/2008 10:39:15 AM , Rating: 2
It all depends on how much Apple wants to focus on selling music and apps and games. Just look at how much money companies make when they sell something digitally instead of having to pay publishers, etc to distribute the game?


RE: Game-changing?
By aftlizard on 7/30/2008 11:17:06 AM , Rating: 5
Microsoft began conceptualization of surface in 2001 and restarted it in 2003 and showed a product in 2005 and later released it in 2007. Looking at those dates I do not see how Surface was a mock of the iPhone.


RE: Game-changing?
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 7/30/2008 11:53:54 AM , Rating: 2
Surface is a completely different and unrelated idea. If you look at what Microsoft talks about in terms of "Surface" and what it "is designed to do". You can see that Microsoft is providing a platform for the future. The iPhone is a slick smart phone for the masses. Short of the touch screen capability (which is completely different on each technology) they have nothing in common. I think Microsoft has it right though. Surface will be all the rage in 10 years.


RE: Game-changing?
By aharris on 7/30/2008 10:45:10 AM , Rating: 2
The key to this news is the fact that the CPU will stay the same, but the feature-supporting chipset is what they're looking to change. I think it could turn out to be a great idea. North bridge supports communication between HDD Storage, memory, and CPU. South bridge supports onboard graphics, ethernet, audio, and onboard peripheral connections.

Improving those two elements of the system? By all means feel free to do so! As for all the speculation of what's actually going to happen, wait it out and see how things go people. This is Apple we're talking about here. They make mistakes, but lately they've been on a roll. I'm convinced they have a clue of what they're doing by now, so let time tell on this one too.


By theapparition on 7/30/2008 12:18:18 PM , Rating: 5
.....and here it is, the technological marvel you've all been waiting for.......

I present to you.....the four button mouse!!!




By rudolphna on 7/30/2008 12:28:19 PM , Rating: 3
lmao +6


By Clauzii on 7/30/2008 12:53:52 PM , Rating: 2
Sorry to spoil it, but You don't need buttons at all..


Has anyone considered...
By mjdaly on 7/30/2008 11:23:04 AM , Rating: 5
Has anyone considered that if Apple begins to make their own chipsets, that they could use this to block clone companies like Psystar in the future? Future versions of OSX could require the presence of an “Apple Chipset” to operate, and if Apple controls the distribution of those chipsets, you can bet they won’t be handing them out for other companies to use.




RE: Has anyone considered...
By Clauzii on 7/30/2008 1:06:56 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe they could even solve the mediocre USB speeds they have at the moment :)

No, I'm not bashing at all, I like my cup of coffee, but they are really behind there.


RE: Has anyone considered...
By kelmon on 7/31/2008 2:37:00 AM , Rating: 2
Yes, but unless Apple loses the court case with Pystar, I really don't think non-endorsed and unsupported clones are an issue to Apple. Certainly I don't think they are a sufficient threat to future profits to warrant a major architectural shift. I'm willing to bet that Pystar themselves have sold very few Mac clones to people outside of the tech industry. Hackintoshes themselves might be more of a threat than the clones but even then I suspect that the number of people who have actually created one is going to be very low (a few hundred maybe, which is a drop in the ocean when Apple sells millions of computers per quarter). I'm sure that a custom chipset will help protect Apple from clones but I am quite certain that, if this is the transition, this isn't the primary reason for it.


Not sure what to think...
By amanojaku on 7/30/2008 9:48:50 AM , Rating: 3
I don't have a reaction to this one way or another. These days it just seems natural that a company would change partners while "searching" for an ideal. Add to that the history of Apple and Intel (coooooooooooooooozy ;-) and I'd say I'm amazed at the, er, longevity.

What's interesting is the article mentions potential partners like nVidia or VIA, but not Intel's biggest rival, AMD. AMD makes decent products, even if they aren't always the fastest (R700 is an exception, as is the original Athlon and Opteron.) AMD's low supply shouldn't be a problem, either, for Apple because of Apple's lower volume of sales compared to PC's.

In the event that Apple does leave Intel I somehow doubt nVidia and VIA will get the business, or that Apple will develop a chip in house. My gut says it would most likely be AMD or some unheard-of upstart, er, start-up company. Now for my next trick I'm going to play the blackjack tables at Vegas...




RE: Not sure what to think...
By ajfink on 7/30/2008 10:20:42 AM , Rating: 1
But AMD's mobile processors/platforms aren't nearly as fast/energy efficient as Intel's at the moment. They're going to be keeping Intel processors, as the article states. Really the only options or Via and Nvidia, as AMD no longer makes Intel chipsets.


RE: Not sure what to think...
By FITCamaro on 7/30/2008 1:07:49 PM , Rating: 3
Actually AMD does.


RE: Not sure what to think...
By jonmcc33 on 7/30/2008 1:28:40 PM , Rating: 1
Not anymore they don't. Not since the CrossFire 3200 for Intel. After AMD acquired ATi there hasn't been any new release.


Recent talks
By 325hhee on 7/30/2008 10:08:26 AM , Rating: 2
Hasn't Apple mentioned they were in talks with Motorola/IBM of recent? Maybe they're going back to the Risc processors? And IBM has been working on a new processor, so it might be something Apple is looking into?




RE: Recent talks
By kelmon on 7/30/2008 10:25:30 AM , Rating: 2
Er, no. I think we can safely say that isn't going to happen for 2 major reasons. Firstly, Apple has only recently completed the migration to Intel processors so they aren't going to switch to something else unless Intel's processor range hits problems (not likely at the moment). Secondly, one of the main reasons why they stopped using Freescale processors was because IBM clearly had no interest in making versions of their POWER processors suitable for Macs due to the low volume. We never did see the mythical PowerBook G5...

I'm sure that Apple will keep their options open with processors in much the same way that they kept OS X running on x86 processors from the start, but they won't make a change unless they have to. The transition to Intel wasn't as painful as it could have been but it was still painful and another transition so soon could kill the platform entirely.


RE: Recent talks
By wallijonn on 7/30/2008 12:33:57 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Maybe they're going back to the Risc processors?


Unlikely, seeing as Apple has gone out of its way to remove PowerPC code from the next OSX release.

What is more likely is a north or south bridge with integrated graphics. I'm sure that what they'd like to see is a one chip design - north & south bridge with integrated memory controller and gpu. More than likely it'll be a 30 or 45nm low power graphics processing unit by AMD/ATI.


By droidtime on 7/30/2008 10:39:29 PM , Rating: 4
I'm a bit muddled in my thinking. If Apple truly moves to a "new" dynamic chip, how is that going to affect their "few" software partners that just spent a bazillion dollars optimizing and rewriting their code to run "native" on the "new" Intel platform? Has anyone pinged Adobe on the proposed change? Not saying it won't run on AMD, just saying it is optimized for Intel. I suspect that Adobe isn't alone in their investment.

Apple is like a tease - "Oh, yeah baby - I can definitely do ENTERPRISE, but I prefer heavy petting". Let's get serious, Apple only gained the market share recently because dual platform finally allowed them to knock on corp America without having the door shut in their face. I can and do believe that only Apple can and will make a truly epic miscalculation as to their self-importance to the corporate user.

Their latest acknowledgment to their “we’re too hip to care” but didn’t get it was just validated by Steve’s keynote address/wound licking session indicating that they now understand “ENTERPRISE” for the IPhone 3G and firmware update 2.0. OMG do you want to sell to corporate America or not? If so, shut up and make product that appeals outside of the Starbucks crowd. The new generation IPhone does appeal to corp America and finally dovetails into Sys Administrators that just wanted basic security when it came to their C level players who wanted the flash and cool factor of the IPhone but didn’t want a product that didn’t come with basic security.

I write this from my Mac Pro running boot camp with XP Pro loaded. I hope they really do make a good decision that will continue to support both operating systems. I was a hardcore Mac user from 1984 for too many bad operating systems to count and finally reluctantly turned to Windows. Now I'm a Gold Certified Microsoft Partner who is again enjoying a Mac. Dear Steve Jobs - Don't F*&k up a good thing you egotistical chowder head.

A+ to Apple for making cool product, D- for not taking the rest of the market into account. Bill retired, just get over yourself and work on innovation – it’s clearly your strength. Apple has always gotten intuitive user interface and slick design. Take a step back and understand how to keep the market – drop the proprietary BS and get with the program.


Stranger Things Have Happened
By kelmon on 7/30/2008 9:28:31 AM , Rating: 2
The report does tie-in with the statement made by Apple during their recent earnings conference call that a significant product transition would be made in the coming months. Given the timing I had assumed this meant an overhaul of the iPod family in time for the US holiday buying season, but it could be this. I honestly can't think what Apple thinks they will gain from this, aside from making clones tougher to make (and I honestly don't think clones are a worry), so that's the aspect of this that gives pause for thought. However, given that we really didn't see the transition to Intel coming this is not outside the realms of possibilities, although I do doubt that the acquisition of P.A. Semi has anything to do with it (too recent).

What is odd about this is the relative frequency of product announcement where the partnership with Intel is praised. Again, another potential reason why this particular rumor is bunk.

Oh well, time to wait and see.




PowerPC
By Tilmitt on 7/30/2008 10:18:26 AM , Rating: 2
As a PowerPC fanboy I would love if they released a new PowerBook based on a chip from PA Semi.




Wait... It DOES make sense
By nukunukoo on 7/30/2008 12:45:56 PM , Rating: 2
Making proprietary chipsets will allow Apple to maintain an Intel CPU base and the next generation OSX will run only on those chipsets, why? Because apple will now license other companies to make Mac-compatible systems. This would also mean that their revenues (as reported) will initially fall since other companies will be making OSX systems that would erode Mac sales. However, Apple will also be making money selling the OS and chipsets.




Convergence
By bpwilldo on 7/30/2008 1:02:08 PM , Rating: 2
My opinion is that Apple is very good at creating a computing environment that is pleasing to the user. I would venture that ,if there is a new platform, it would be one that would more tightly integrate their current and future products.




By ZachDontScare on 7/30/2008 2:39:51 PM , Rating: 2
If by 'moving from Intel', they mean moving to a non x86 platform, then it'd be phenominally stupid. If they want people to develop software for their OS, they cant keep changing chipsets every couple of years. Who wants to spend a couple years developing a piece of software that suddenly wont run on the newest mac's because their compiler cant build for the new platform? Who will even want to start a project knowing that Apple may change the chipset in two years to who knows what? Big companies may, but niche developers - what Apple severely lacks - wont be able to afford that.




Apple lives of innovations
By excrucio on 7/30/2008 2:58:21 PM , Rating: 2
I believe if Apple would to go nVidia or VIA it would be best to choose VIA. VIA has both chipset and cpu knowledge and has good products if they really put the effort into competing with Intel and AMD. If Apple goes nVidia, well Intel still the CPU, so whats the point?

Ah, maybe it's an AMD partner ship that would put Apple in a tough spot, lower margins of profit but AMD's technology for Laptops is great, their GFX card solution is another great product. Hey you never know.

I would love to see them adopt the AMD platform instead of the others




CPU / chipset
By Ironchump on 7/31/2008 3:25:16 AM , Rating: 2
Whats a better way to get someone to build for you what you want then showing them that you can do it yourself. I know Intel is a big company but they still need to turn over product. With the increase in Apple computer etc on the market this is something they cannot lose. The invest Apple made by buy this chip company will be less than the discounts they maybe able to get Intel to give (or less money on R&D they might have to spend to catch up).
It might be a good way of spending some money to get a better long term reduction. I know its probably wrong but just a thought.




Smells like SLI
By Lord 666 on 7/30/08, Rating: -1
RE: Smells like SLI
By kelmon on 7/30/2008 11:46:08 AM , Rating: 3
If Apple releases a laptop that supports SLI, or allows the user to upgrade the GPU, I'll eat my hat. That sort of thing is very much in the gaming area and Apple clearly has no interest in that market.


RE: Smells like SLI
By Clauzii on 7/30/2008 1:01:14 PM , Rating: 2
To me a Mobile HD4850/30 would seem like a good guess, since it's cheap and could keep the total price of the new MacBooks low enough.

I don't think it's nVidia for now, given the problems with their mobile GPUs. At least I'd then expect a delay on the new MacBooks, which will probably not happen.


"If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion." -- Scientology founder L. Ron. Hubbard














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki