backtop


Print 58 comment(s) - last by rollakid.. on Jul 14 at 8:29 PM


Seagate 7200.11 1.5TB HDD  (Source: Seagate)
Seagate 1.5TB HDD uses four platters

It has only been about a year and a half since the first 1TB hard drives began to hit the market -- Hitachi was the first to unveil its 1TB HDD in January of 2007.

Just this week Hitachi unveiled its second generation 1TB HDD with a 43% power savings compared to the first generation. The Hitachi drive uses three platters to get the 1TB capacity and save energy. Today, Seagate announced the world’s first 1.5TB desktop hard drive called the Barracuda 7200.11 1.5TB.

As you can gather by the name, the drive spins at 7,200 RPM and uses four platters to reach the massive 1.5TB capacity. Seagate says that this is the largest increase in storage capacity in the last 50-years and the 500GB increase in capacity is thanks to improved perpendicular magnetic recording technology.

Along with the 1.5TB 3.5-inch desktop HDD, Seagate also announced new 500GB 2.5-inch HDDs for use in notebooks. The 500GB notebook drives will ship in 5,400 and 7,200 rpm varieties. The drives are known as the Momentus 5400.6 and Momentus 7200.4 HDDs. The 5,400 RPM drive uses an 8MB cache and the 7,200 drive has a 16MB cache.

Seagate executive VP and general manager of Personal Computer Business Michael Wingert said in a statement, “Organizations and consumers of all kinds worldwide continue to create, share and consume digital content at levels never before seen, giving rise to new markets, new applications and demand for desktop and notebook computers with unprecedented storage capacity, performance and reliability. Seagate is committed to powering the next generation of computing today with the planet’s fastest, highest-capacity and most reliable storage solutions.”

Seagate announced in 2006 that it expected capacity of HDDs to hit 2.5TB by 2009. The Seagate 1TB HDD was announced a bit over a year ago in June 2007.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: RPM?
By CosmoJoe on 7/10/2008 1:56:41 PM , Rating: 3
Faster RPM means more heat and noise. For general use drives the trade-off is probably not there.

The better question would be, why is WD the only manufacturer to offer a 10k SATA drive (the Raptor)....


RE: RPM?
By ImSpartacus on 7/10/2008 2:07:29 PM , Rating: 2
Well The velociraptor is a 2.5in drive so it is barely louder, or warmer than 3.5in 7200rpm drives (if at all).

I'm surprised that more desktop 2.5in 7200rpm drives with capacties between 500GB and 1000GB. If laptop 2.5in drives can hit 500GB, desktop ones (thicker drive) should be able to hit at least 750GB.

What I want to know is how they are getting to 1500GB with 4 platters. That's 375GB platters. I thought the largest platters were 333.3GB ones used in 1000GB drives.


RE: RPM?
By stryfe on 7/10/2008 2:45:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
...the 500GB increase in capacity is thanks to improved perpendicular magnetic recording technology.

This would indicate they've made new platters. The only question is how big the new platters are. As you said, they have to be 375GB to hit 1.5TB in 4 platters. I wonder if they're 400GB which would allow 2TB with 5 of them?


RE: RPM?
By coldpower27 on 7/13/2008 7:55:09 AM , Rating: 2
The thing though is that with this technology we can upgrade the 750GB models out now to 2 platters, like the WD 640GB which has been the highest 2 platter model to date.

I so hope Seagate or Hitachi release new 750GB models.


RE: RPM?
By pattycake0147 on 7/10/2008 3:52:37 PM , Rating: 2
In another article it says...
quote:
The drive is known as the Deskstar 7K1000.B and the main feature is the use of three platters that each store 374GB of data.

http://www.dailytech.com/Hitachi+Second+Generation...

Seagate is probably using the same technology here.


RE: RPM?
By JonnyDough on 7/11/2008 4:44:04 AM , Rating: 2
If they increased capacity per platter, I want to see what the single platter 374GB drive is like. It should be fast, energy efficient, and VERY cool. Literally.

I have two Seagate ST3250410AS in raid-1 in my PC now and they're nice and quiet. They use 2 heads and one disc. It will be interesting to compare these new drives with higher capacity against my current drives. 374GB on a single platter is nothing to scoff at.

I still have an old, recently non-working (I accidentally dropped it once about 12" and it no longer worked), =( Toshiba 130MB notebook drive. I have a thinner but louder 4GB Fujitsu notebook drive too that still works! But it's far too loud to be kept installed in my desktop comp. I have it adapted so I can access it though if I want. =)


RE: RPM?
By soxfan on 7/11/2008 7:55:33 AM , Rating: 2
Given that the Deskstar is a Hitachi drive, and Hitachi and Seagate are competitors, I doubt they are using the same technology per se. In fact, I know for certain that both Hitachi and Seagate have developed their own flavors of perpenicular magnetic recording media. Thus, they are probably using their own proprietary technology.


RE: RPM?
By Clauzii on 7/10/2008 5:14:14 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe they are getting ready to SSD? - I hope :)


RE: RPM?
By HrilL on 7/10/2008 2:15:28 PM , Rating: 2
There are more complexities then just putting in a faster motor. The read and write heads have to be able to work at the faster speed as well. That is one of the reasons why the densities on the WD 10k rpm drives are less than that of 7200rpm drives. Actually that goes for pretty much all high rpm drives. Be is SCSI, SATA, or fiber Channel.


"If they're going to pirate somebody, we want it to be us rather than somebody else." -- Microsoft Business Group President Jeff Raikes

Related Articles
Seagate Announces 1TB Drives
June 25, 2007, 3:15 PM
Seagate Says 2.5TB Drives By 2009
September 15, 2006, 2:56 PM













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki