backtop


Print 64 comment(s) - last by afkrotch.. on Jul 7 at 7:50 AM


In-game XMB accesses

PS3 game Trophies
2.40 firmware bricks some PS3 consoles

Many rejoiced late last night when Sony posted the 2.40 firmware update for the Playstation 3. The 2.40 brought a number of improvements to the platform including in-game XMB accesses, a new Trophy system similar in concept to Xbox 360 Achievements, and the ability for gamers to use music playlists within games (provided that the game developers provides a patch to support the feature).

Shortly after the update went live, many users began reporting problems with the update. A thread over at the official Playstation 3 forums is currently up to 61-pages and is filled with a number of irate owners.

According to Kotaku, the update is causing some controllers to malfunction, and in many cases, it bricks the system altogether. All Playstation 3 systems -- 20GB, 40GB, 60GB, and 80GB -- have an equal chance in having problems with the update, so no one is safe.

There are currently numerous theories and workarounds being proposed by forum-goers, but no one fix has been found to fix everyone's 2.40 firmware woes.

Because of the widespread problems, Sony decided to pull firmware update. In a statement released this afternoon, the company said, "In order to further assess the issue, we have temporarily taken the firmware offline for further testing. We are working diligently to isolate the problem for those few consumers and to identify a solution before we put the firmware back up."

No other details were provided on when the "fixed" 2.40 firmware will be uploaded or if a 2.41 firmware will simply be issued to address the problems at hand.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: No excuse!
By EricMartello on 7/3/2008 12:59:36 AM , Rating: -1
quote:
Yes, lets leave out user replaceable hard drives, controllers that aren't made by Sony, games that aren't created by Sony, and whatever else.


If the system's core firmware is affected by any of these devices in a way that would result in bricking - I'd say you got a poorly designed system. My 14 year old SNES still works fine, and I've never had a catastrophic PC failure due to my choice in input peripherals. :D

quote:
You can run into issues where GTAIV has issues with the firmware and bricks the system.


Bricking has been a staple Sony tactic for fighting the good fight against piracy. Hey, spend $600 on a console...now it's useless. OOPS! It was probably that non-sony TV that you had your console plugged into...

quote:
If they were kept segregated like on a PC, we'd just get the standard gamut of BSODs, kernel panics, etc and not a non-POSTing PC. Course at the same time, how many firmware updates on PC have you had cause issues?


Well now there's a good reason we keep critical low level OS operations separate from the "bloatware and extra features you really don't need but are fun to have even if they're never used" layer.

I rarely have issues updating my BIOS...in fact, I've never had a BIOS update failure. Knowing what I'm doing may have a slight effect...and even if I did toast a BIOS chip, it's not like I can't just buy a new one for $20 and voila.

quote:
I've had plenty where I had to revert back to an older firmware. Asus, Abit, Gigabyte, MSI, etc. Their firmwares aren't perfect either.


See original post. The PC's vast array of potential hardware configurations make it highly impractical for any QC department to test for every possible contingency...

Unlike the console, which is an appliance with a FIXED HARDWARE CONFIGURATION and is perfectly feasible to test for EVERY possible scenario before releasing firmware.

Obviously you don't have a PS3, or if you do, it was not bricked by 2.4...I'm sure if your system was bricked you would not be extending as much leniency toward Sony.


RE: No excuse!
By ZaethDekar on 7/4/2008 6:18:43 PM , Rating: 1
Just so you know, ANY electronic device with an OS has been hacked. Now what could have happened is these people installed something onto their PS3 and is trying to read something that is no longer there. Thus is stops working.

You can't blame everything on the manufacturer. Now if it bricked every PS3, that is way different then some PS3's.


"Let's face it, we're not changing the world. We're building a product that helps people buy more crap - and watch porn." -- Seagate CEO Bill Watkins











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki