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Are you ready for the new law going into effect on July 1?

Three more days.  That's the number of days left before drivers in California will be forced to go hands-free while using a cell phone in the car, even if they aren't necessarily ready for the new law to go into effect.

Will the law make the roads safer?  Are drivers ready?  Do people even care?

If you're a Californian who is going to roll the dice and keep chatting on a phone without using a Bluetooth headset or speaker phone, the first offense will be $100.  If you keep on going, the fines can reach $190 for a second offense, with the fine continuing to increase with each additional violation.

But if you do end up getting a ticket come next week, Headsets.com will be giving away 730 free Discovery 925 Bluetooth headsets for drivers who get busted.  A law firm in the Bay Area island town of Alameda will hand out 2,000 Bluetooth headsets to Bay Area residents even if they don't get a ticket. 

The law does allow users with Sprint Nextel push-to-talk to continue using the push-to-talk feature without using Bluetooth technology.  If you're content with simply using your phone's speaker phone, you'll also be allowed to do that.

In case you're wondering, it's still going to be legal to send text messages while driving -- for now.  California Senator Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto), who authored the current hands-free law, recently wrote a new bill that will ban text messaging while driving.

If you're using a Bluetooth headset, please familiarize yourself with it before getting into the car and learning how to use your new gadget while driving.

Does using a Bluetooth headset actually make driving safer?  The jury is still out on this one, but either way, we still have to deal with it.  Researcher done at the University of Utah indicate drivers using a cell phone are 5.36 times more likely to get into a traffic accident, which roughly is on the same level of danger as driving with a .08 blood-alcohol level.

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger believes the new law will help keep drivers safer, but researchers indicate it's more about a driver's attention and processing capacity instead of whether or not they're holding a cell phone.

A public survey done by Parrot indicates 63 percent of people who drive at least one hour per day talk on the cell phone for non-urgent matters.

Remember folks, the law officially goes into effect on Tuesday, July 1!



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RE: Stupid
By Screwballl on 6/30/2008 12:31:31 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Ahh...but I'll bet ticket revenue has increased. Which is what this is really all about. Tickets are a tax.


EXACTLY!

They can secretly care less if it makes the roads safer, they just want more money to pay for more unneeded things like a 15% pay increase for legislators at the expense of the taxpayer. They need to use the money made to pay for more traffic cops to enforce this and all traffic laws.
If done right, they need to make the law exact wording: Any cell or portable phone or devices that can be used to send or receive voice or text messages cannot be used by the driver of any licensed personal or commercial vehicle at anytime while the vehicle is moving our out of park/neutral gear. If the vehicle is parked in a legal parking spot, driveway, or other non-roadway and the vehicle is not moving then it is legal to use the devices.

All out ban on talking or texting while driving is the best way to go. Florida did this a few years ago (all out ban while driving) but unfortunately their tickets and methods of catching the drivers are lackluster and it continues with accidents the same or higher than before.


"I'd be pissed too, but you didn't have to go all Minority Report on his ass!" -- Jon Stewart on police raiding Gizmodo editor Jason Chen's home

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