backtop


Print 102 comment(s) - last by coal2be.. on Jun 14 at 8:13 AM


Japanese JR-Maglev  (Source: Yosemite)
Government funnels $45M into maglev proposal.

President Bush signed a transportation bill that will help fund a high speed maglev train between Disneyland and Las Vegas. The initial $45M investment will be used for environmental studies to evaluate construction impact on one portion of the proposed maglev route.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., showed support of the project and said the maglev train "will safely and efficiently move people between southern California and Las Vegas."

As more nations begin to roll out maglev train systems, critics in the U.S. grow increasingly frustrated over the lack of support of organized high speed trains in the United States.

With speeds up to 300 MPH, the maglev train will be able to transport passengers between the two locations, about 250 miles apart, in less than two hours. Most drivers who go from the Los Angeles or Anaheim area to Las Vegas are forced to take Interstate 15, but the highway routinely is clogged with gridlock during rush hour.

Congress must now choose the maglev system over other train projects under consideration by the government, including a diesel-electric train that was proposed after a 2005 funding mishap that delayed the Disneyland-Las Vegas line. Japan was the first nation to launch a diesel-hybrid train system, but the train was twice as expensive to build as a regular train.

The United States Maglev Coalition (USMC) is an organization wanting to develop maglev technology in the U.S. The group helped the federal government fix a September 2005 report that "unfairly and erroneously criticized maglev's costs while ignoring its benefits."

Maglev trains are extremely expensive to create, so $45M could easily lead to a multi-billion dollar investment. The Shanghai maglev train network cost almost $30M per mile to create, and a proposed route in Japan is estimated to cost up to $82B to complete.

Germany, Canada, England, China and Japan are included in the small selection of countries that either have working maglev systems or are testing maglev technology.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: It's a small world afterall
By TomZ on 6/9/2008 3:49:05 PM , Rating: 2
I agree, but in the case of WWII, there was a compelling need for that investment. In this case, the government funding something like maglev seems to have very few benefits to the taxpayers.


RE: It's a small world afterall
By FITCamaro on 6/9/2008 4:23:01 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly. You're basically making everyone pay for a system that only a small fraction of people will use.

If I want lunch, should I be allowed to go take a dollar out of the people around me's wallets?


RE: It's a small world afterall
By spluurfg on 6/9/2008 6:22:58 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Exactly. You're basically making everyone pay for a system that only a small fraction of people will use.


Well, the flipside is that if the government never stumps up for anything, certain technologies will take longer (or may never) get momentum. If they can get the maglev industry going to the point where the cost per mile of track drops significantly, it could become economically sensible for a much larger number of projects throughout the US, thus potentially benefiting many.

quote:
If I want lunch, should I be allowed to go take a dollar out of the people around me's wallets?


Nope, that'd be stealing. Is this really the same?


RE: It's a small world afterall
By androticus on 6/10/2008 10:46:22 PM , Rating: 2
previous poster's comment equating stealing lunch money from others with govt appropriations for things like maglev
quote:

Nope, that'd be stealing. Is this really the same?


It never fails to amaze me the degree to which people will evade the nature of an act and mindlessly sanctify any and all forms of government appropriation under the rubric of "democracy" or whatever they think justifies it. And then when you try to push it a bit and ask if "democratic" victimization or discrimination are ok, they get all huffy and scream "that isn't the same thing."

No, it is never the same thing, is it?

The only *moral* act of a government is one that protects its citizens' rights to their lives and property. Anything else is just the mob justifying its immoral use of force under the cowardly rubric of "democracy".

Yes, I would favor a PRIVATELY FUNDED maglev. No, I will not accept that taking people's hard-earned money by force to pay for a government funded maglev, is ok.


RE: It's a small world afterall
By spluurfg on 6/12/2008 5:40:42 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
It never fails to amaze me the degree to which people will evade the nature of an act and mindlessly sanctify any and all forms of government appropriation under the rubric of "democracy" or whatever they think justifies it.


quote:
Yes, I would favor a PRIVATELY FUNDED maglev. No, I will not accept that taking people's hard-earned money by force to pay for a government funded maglev, is ok.


Who's sanctifying it? I think it's obviously different from stealing, I didn't say that it's the best use of tax money. That's up to feasibility studies such as this one to determine, so that elected officials can make an informed decision.

quote:
The only *moral* act of a government is one that protects its citizens' rights to their lives and property. Anything else is just the mob justifying its immoral use of force under the cowardly rubric of "democracy".


So are you opposed to your tax money going to any and all infrastructure projects? Should the US highway and transportation appropriations be $0 per state? Should minicipal and state run education systems be abolished?

You may feel that the maglev lies outside the boundaries of sensible use of tax dollars -- if so, write to your local representative. However, I encourage you to be realistic about the way that public services must function.


By Mojo the Monkey on 6/13/2008 3:53:32 PM , Rating: 2
what a narrow view you have. people in the area have been begging for this kind of system for years. A station in Anaheim will service people from the north LA valleys down to San Clemente - many millions of people. This project will also serve as a test platform for other highly traveled, long distance routes in other parts of the country.

quote:
You're basically making everyone pay for a system that only a small fraction of people will use.


Yeah, programs like handicapped access, closed captioning for the def, braille on signs for the blind, federal funding in the limb prosthesis research... ALL A CRIME ON THE TAXPAYER, right? [sarcasm]. Because by your definition, this tiny, insignificant portion of the population who will benefit is just robbing your wallet.

Public works are expensive in the short run, but the idea is progressive ongoing benefit to the general population's quality of life. If you only worked on projects for the absolute majority every time, woe unto you if you ever fall outside the curve.


RE: It's a small world afterall
By teldar on 6/9/2008 6:50:04 PM , Rating: 3
I dont' know that there wouldn't be benefit to a whole lot more people if the technology matured.

Imagine 8 maglev trains in the country. One north and south bound on each coast and one east and west bound across the middle and south of the country. 5 stops per train per route or less.

NY to Florida in 5 hours including stops on the way.

8 hours from NY to Portland or SF with stops in St Louis Denver and Salt Lake City.

Jacksonville to LA with stops in New Orleans, Houston, (or dallas or austin) and phoenix.
It would be worth it for cross country travel alone.

T


RE: It's a small world afterall
By Jedi2155 on 6/10/2008 9:12:21 PM , Rating: 2
But you forgot about Ogdenville, North Haverbrook, and Brockway!!!!


By Mojo the Monkey on 6/13/2008 3:54:51 PM , Rating: 2
...and it sure put them on the map!

monorail, monorail, monorail


"We can't expect users to use common sense. That would eliminate the need for all sorts of legislation, committees, oversight and lawyers." -- Christopher Jennings











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki