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Intel's Kentsfield CPU (top) will be the first quad core desktop chip, Clovertown will be the server equivalent - Courtesy AnandTech.com
According to Intel, it says quad-core for desktops will be ready by 2007

IDF is definitely showcasing a host of exciting technologies, but today Intel showed details of some very interesting technology in regards to where servers and desktops will be heading in 2007. According to company slides, Intel expects to be shipping multi-core Xeon processors based on the Montecito core by mid-year 2006. Targeting the MP segment, Intel's next-generation Tulsa processor will be manufactured using 65nm fabrication technology with large 16MB caches.

For the desktop segment, Intel indicated that Kentsfield will be the first quad-core processor and will be released in Q1 of 2007 after Conroe. During mid-year 2006, Intel will introduce its Bridge Creek platform but it did not indicate whether or not it will be Kentsfield ready. Recently, AMD also indicated that it will be introducing quad-core processors in 2007 for the server segment, but did not talk about the desktop space. According to Intel slides, Kentsfield will be focused on immediately after Conroe.

Intel indicated that quad-core processors will only be needed for the very highest-end desktops. Corporate users and enterprise level productivity software will also be a target for Kentsfield. Tigerton, Intel's quad-core MP processor, will also be released in early 2007.


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RE: What OS'es will support this CPU??
By phaxmohdem on 3/8/2006 7:44:48 PM , Rating: 2
I don't see why they would need it.... Hyperthreading was created as sort of an enhancement for the Netburst architecture, which as we all know suffers greatly in the case of pipeline stalls. Hyperthreading keeps feeding the CPU during these times to both reduce latency, and help in processing simultaneous threads..

This whole argument has been gone over before, when people asked whether or not the A64 architecture would benefit from such technology as HyperThreading, and the consensus seems to be that it would not see any drastic or practical gains, due to its short pipeline length, and efficiency as-is. The number escapes me.. but 15 pipelines?? (A64) is a lot easier to recover from than having to flush out 31 different stages (P4 Prescott) I don't see why Conroe which is based on Pentium M as we all know (~15 pipes) would benefit from HT.


By defter on 3/12/2006 1:51:07 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The number escapes me.. but 15 pipelines?? (A64) is a lot easier to recover from than having to flush out 31 different stages (P4 Prescott) I don't see why Conroe which is based on Pentium M as we all know (~15 pipes) would benefit from HT.


Pipeline length has vert little to do with benefits of SMT. For example Sun Niagara has 6 stage pipeline and it supports 4-way SMT. It definately benefits from SMT.


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