backtop


Print 55 comment(s) - last by Jedi2155.. on Apr 25 at 1:08 AM

Not quite a two-seater hybrid electric, but ORNL's new nuclear fuel promises to boost efficiency by as much as 900%.

U.S. Nuclear reactors are not known for their fuel efficiency. At a mere three to four percent burn-up, much of the uranium fuel is wasted and current reactors produce large amounts of unsightly nuclear waste. Advanced gas reactors may offer a better choice for the aging U.S. nuclear power posse.

Working together with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Babcock & Wilcox Company, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), with funding from the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Science, has produced a new fuel for the high temperatures of advanced gas reactors. In tests conducted at the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, the fuel reached a nine percent burn-up, a near three-fold efficiency gain from traditional water-cooled nuclear plant fuel and halfway to the targeted 16 to 18 percent.

The fuel, produced in the ORNL Materials Science and Technology Division, is made up of thousands of tiny carbon and silicon carbide coated spheres of uranium, which are compressed into fuel sticks and loaded into a graphite form.

With growing concerns about nuclear reactor waste products, skeptical outlooks for the future of nuclear power and foreign companies selling mini-plants to U.S. customers, a new, more efficient fuel made in America is a ray of hope for U.S. nuclear power advocates. Though it will possibly never be without its own pollution problems, further refinement and research into fission reactors may yield a very efficient and comparatively clean energy generation model.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

By Davelo on 4/15/2008 1:23:36 PM , Rating: -1
Sure. Easy for you to say unless you live next door to a nuke plant. There is a decommissioned one about 20 miles from my house. As you get closer to it you start to see the air raid sirens which are mounted on poles at road side. They are an ominous sign of the danger inherent in this technology. Once the chain reaction gets out of control it's bend over and kiss your bottom goodbye. I'm glad the nuke plant up the hill is no longer active. If not I probably would not have moved here.


By kjboughton on 4/15/2008 2:19:29 PM , Rating: 5
I've spent over six years in nuclear power overseeing the operation of a multitude of different plants. Trust me when I tell you they are no more dangerous than any other heavily industrialized area.

The fact that you show fear for the sirens located near your home just goes to prove my point. I bet there's a fire alarm in every public building you enter but I doubt you get all fearful of the constant threat of a fire whenever you enter one of these places. If you're smart then there's a fire extinguisher in your kitchen, too - am I to believe my life would be in grave danger if I came over for dinner for one evening? Point being, safety systems are intended to provide protection in the case of an accident, not to forshadow any increased sense of threat.

Could it be that the “ominous threat” is just a byproduct of your conditioning? It’s important to understand that nuclear power can be just as safe as any other industry. The first step in all of this is to help people realize that they may have an unfounded bias against this wonderful source of power.


By mindless1 on 4/16/2008 5:20:12 AM , Rating: 1
Apples and oranges. If my neighbor across town has a fire in their kitchen while I'm asleep, it's not likely I'd have any problems as a result the next day. Not only the scope but the controllablilty of a disaster is far better with most types of accident.

I'm not saying the odds are higher, as I don't think they are, but the same basic greed and human error scenarios can effect everything. Odds are it'll never be a problem. Odds catch up to some people eventually.


By FITCamaro on 4/15/2008 2:28:58 PM , Rating: 2
The only thing bad about that plant is that its decommissioned.

So instead of the one in several thousand, or tens of thousand, chance of the nuclear plant blowing up, you'd rather have a coal plant spewing black smoke.

You base nuclear safety off the few incidents of disaster from poorly funded plants. And even if it was 100% guaranteed that a nuclear plant would never have problems, they'd still have speakers outside to warn of a problem. It's called "just in case".


By Durrr on 4/15/2008 9:44:56 PM , Rating: 2
Not to mention the radioisotopes a coal plant churns out on a daily basis is astounding.


By kjboughton on 4/15/2008 2:33:06 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
Once the chain reaction gets out of control it's bend over and kiss your bottom goodbye.


What???? Are you speaking from experience or are you just spurting out nonsense? Do you have any idea how a nuclear chain reaction works or are you trying to dazzle us with your BS? I call shenanigans. I know what could happen should multiple levels of automatic and manual safeties were to fail and it wouldn’t involve any bending or kissing.

Way to feed the fire. Its statements like these that will keep us forever tied to energy sources controlled by some of the most evil regimes in history.


By Chernobyl68 on 4/16/2008 12:18:28 PM , Rating: 2
LOL I read that bit and started laughing as well. Ignorant hyterics can be quite amusing.


By Fenixgoon on 4/15/2008 9:22:30 PM , Rating: 2
I lived near Calvert Cliffs Nuclear power plant in MD and I was glad to hear that they were a site considered for an additional reactor expansion. Nuclear power = win.

Nuke plants != nuke bombs. I think many people have that misconception.


By Alexstarfire on 4/16/2008 1:06:46 AM , Rating: 2
That is so true. While you may be able to turn a nuclear plant into a nuclear bomb, it'd be a monumental waste of time. A nuclear meltdown is far different from a nuclear explosion.


"I modded down, down, down, and the flames went higher." -- Sven Olsen














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki