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The truth comes out about User Account Control

Microsoft's Windows Vista operating system has been lambasted ever since it was launched for consumers in January 2007. Diehard Windows users balked at the steep system requirements, sometimes sluggish performance, inadequate driver support, and varying products SKUs at multiple price points.

One feature that has caused quite a bit of controversy with consumers has been the User Account Control (UAC) that is included in Windows Vista. UAC prompts nag users for simple operations such as going to device manager, emptying the recycle bin, or installing/uninstalling an application.

David Cross, a product manager responsible for designing UAC, gave the real reason for UAC at the RSA 2008 conference in San Francisco yesterday. "The reason we put UAC into the platform was to annoy users. I'm serious," remarked Cross.

Cross added that Microsoft's unorthodox method to stop users from wreaking havoc with their systems and to stop software makers from making applications that delved too far into the Windows subsystem was a necessary move.

"We needed to change the ecosystem, and we needed a heavy hammer to do it," Cross added. Cross went on to say that although UAC may be seen as an annoyance to some, but its lasting implications are far more beneficial to Vista users. "Most users, on a daily basis, actually have zero UAC prompts."

Many would say that many users have zero UAC prompts on a daily basis because they have already disabled UAC -- not so says Microsoft. According to Cross, 88% of Vista users have UAC enabled and 66% of Windows sessions do not encounter UAC prompts.



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RE: Zero Click Security?
By eye smite on 4/11/2008 12:21:49 PM , Rating: -1
No, no, and no. People are not sheep. They are capable of learning just fine. They take the time to learn how to dress properly, drive a car, run a washing machine and dryer, use a lawnmower and so on. If they don't take the time to learn to use a computer properly, they deserve a train wreck, and those experiences tend to be the best teacher. Controlling someone's usage so that they can't hose the system is unethical, no matter you slice the pie. You viewing it as a service is probably from an IT point of view. How many people in the general public right now would get just mad from hearing about this. Even though they don't understand what it does, if they found out they were being controlled on THEIR computer, they would get mad. Once a computer is bought, the OS is no longer MS's, I don't care what the Eula says, it belongs to the person that bought it, get that straight too. So, in closing, you cite me any example in any aspect of society where the public has been controlled without their knowledge and make me believe it was ethical.


RE: Zero Click Security?
By darkpaw on 4/11/2008 12:27:48 PM , Rating: 2
Theres a reason every lawn mower has those saftey stickers plastered all over them... some people are stupid enough to stick their hands/feet/other appendages into them.

People can learn, but most people can't learn the way I and many other computer focused people did. I wiped out the os so many times on my original PC while learning, but I was willing to pay the price. If average user wipes out their OS they end up spending $200 to have those geek squad idiots fix it for them. They don't learn, just pay the price to have it fixed.


RE: Zero Click Security?
By Rob Pintwala on 4/11/2008 12:37:33 PM , Rating: 2
I agree that people should learn, but to learn we need to make mistakes. My problem with this is that making mistakes on a PC can be a VERY costly endeavor for the vast majority of people who are unable to rectify their PC problems on their own.


RE: Zero Click Security?
By nyarrgh on 4/11/2008 4:35:15 PM , Rating: 2
I use Unix and I use Vista. In Unix, I have to sudo or psh, In Vista, i use "run as administrator". I don't see anything wrong with this. I do have a machine with UAC disabled, I don't see anything wrong with that either. I may have taken the time to learn how to use a computer properly, but Hell will freeze over before you can get my grandmother to do so. Some people are forgetting that not all people share their inclination towards computers. I don't expect everybody to learn the way I did, the same way I don't expect to have time or the inclination to learn how to sew properly, or glass blowing, or bullfighting.


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