backtop


Print 61 comment(s) - last by EricMartello.. on Apr 9 at 9:49 PM

The Twin Cities are the lucky guinea pigs for Comcast's new high-speed internet

Verizon's FiOS fiber broadband connection is currently the only option for United States Internet surfers to wander about the world wide web while downloading content at up to 50 Mbps and uploading data at up to 20 Mbps. However, Verizon's FiOS service is limited to a few areas at this time, even though roll-out is being performed slowly but surely.

Recently, Comcast also announced plans to increase the maximum bandwidth of its broadband service to 50 Mbps download and 5 Mbps upload bandwidth to compete with Verizon.

Currently, Comcast is running its broadband service aalong the DOCSIS 2.0 protocol, or the second generation of the Data Over Cable Service Interface Specifications. This protocol tops out with a maximum downstream bandwidth of 42.88 Mbps while the maximum upstream bandwidth tops out at 30.72 Mbps.

For Comcast to increase its bandwidth, it will have to begin using DOCSIS 3.0 compliant hardware. The initial DOCSIS 3.0 specs will utilize four channels over cable; which allows the compatible hardware to serve twice the amount of data per second than DOCSIS 2.0's dual channel design.

Through the 4-channel design, DOCSIS 3.0 compliant hardware will allow a maximum of 170 Mbps and 123 Mbps downstream and upstream bandwidth respectively. To achieve this higher bandwidth, Comcast must upgrade its back-end infrastructure to to hardware complaint with DOCSIS 3.0 and must also provide upgrades to customers' leased modems or offer new hardware that is capable of supporting DOCSIS 3.0.

The high-bandwidth options from Comcast are in trial in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota but Comcast states it will begin mass rollout once the design has been finalized and ready for use over its nationwide infrastructure, which Comcast's president of marketing and product development states may be by 2010.

Meanwhile, Verizon has brought its fiber-based broadband connection to a number of markets in the U.S. If Comcast goes through with these speed increases, we may hopefully see some long-awaited price wars in the broadband industry.

Pricing for the 50/20 Mbps download/upload package is stated around $150 and is only planned for the residential market. Business owners may have the option for a higher-bandwidth package in the future, however, no pricing information has been made available at this time.


Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: The rest of us...
By Tripp1717 on 4/4/2008 9:03:41 AM , Rating: 2
Hey all, i live in Connecticut and i use cable. Not comcast but rather Optimum Online. I currently pay 40 bucks a month and I get 30mb/s download and 4 upload and have had it for a few years now. I pay 10 bucks more and get Optimim Onlkine Boost. The difference is that regular Optimum gets 15mb/s download and 2mb/s up load and is priced at 30 bucks a month. I hate it when i hear that the USA sucks at broadband, granted in MOST of the USA it does, but not the Tri State area. Optium is available in CT, NJ, NY, and Long Island. I also get there phone package for 20 bucks a month and it includes free long distance anywhere in USA/Canada/Peurto Rico. Anyone living in the tri state should look to see if you can get optimum online.


RE: The rest of us...
By marsbound2024 on 4/4/2008 3:03:17 PM , Rating: 2
Where I live, I have to pay around $50 a month just to get my 1.5mbps down and 512kb up. Too expensive, but I surely cannot return to dialup.


“And I don't know why [Apple is] acting like it’s superior. I don't even get it. What are they trying to say?” -- Bill Gates on the Mac ads











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki