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Latest Blu-ray Disc copy protection circumvented by PC software

Although Hollywood movie studios have little choice in which format they release their high-definition content, companies such as Disney and Fox chose Blu-ray Disc for its added copy protection features.

Since the AACS copy protection scheme was defeated, Blu-ray Disc had BD Plus (BD+), launched in June 2007 as a secondary protection method.

Like any other software protection scheme, however, it was only a matter of time before BD+ would be circumvented. In the latest version of SlySoft AnyDVD HD, released on Wednesday, the top new feature notes that the 6.4.0.0 software can now remove the BD protection from Blu-ray Discs. The release note also mentions that the removal of BD+ increases compatibility with titles released by Twentieth Century Fox.

Effectively an embedded virtual machine inside player hardware, BD+ allows content providers to include executables on Blu-ray Discs to perform specific, content protecting functions. For example, the BD+ virtual machine could run diagnostics on the host environment to see if the disc player has been modified, or to verify that the keys have not been changed.

As part of the BD+ scheme, video may be deliberately corrupted or modified to prevent the ripping of the data stream for piracy purposes. The BD+ environment, once verified, will correct and descramble the content to render it viewable.



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The definition of irony...
By phatboye on 3/20/2008 6:33:23 PM , Rating: 2
I thought the entire purpose for movie studios to move from DVD and one of the main reasons why BD had more support from major studios at first than HD-DVD was because of this additional copy protection scheme.

When will these Holywood suit ever learn. Try as you may, your DRM schemes will never prevail. Stop wasting your money on it, it only causes more headaches for those who want legally archive their media and does absolutely nothing to stop copyright infringement.




RE: The definition of irony...
By ElFenix on 3/20/2008 6:52:27 PM , Rating: 5
'you mean, if we hand someone the lock and the key, even if the key a needle in a haystack, someone can still find it and operate the lock? why didn't you tell us this sooner?'


RE: The definition of irony...
By mendocinosummit on 3/20/2008 7:04:10 PM , Rating: 5
Nowadays somebody always has a magnet.


RE: The definition of irony...
By jadeskye on 3/20/2008 7:49:24 PM , Rating: 5
ain't that the truth.


RE: The definition of irony...
By ImSpartacus on 3/23/2008 4:03:55 PM , Rating: 2
We have all these MacGyver-wannabies that carry around toothpicks, spare car tires and all kinds of other stuff.


RE: The definition of irony...
By Hypernova on 3/20/2008 8:31:04 PM , Rating: 5
or burn the haystack and filter the ashes.


RE: The definition of irony...
By feelingshorter on 3/20/2008 9:07:13 PM , Rating: 2
That was done on myth busters. I believe the best way to find the needle was to use a magnet because burning it caused a lot of problems.


RE: The definition of irony...
By Silver2k7 on 3/21/2008 5:28:27 AM , Rating: 2
Its much worse finding a needle in a needle stack..


RE: The definition of irony...
By Webreviews on 3/21/2008 8:31:44 AM , Rating: 5
Actually, finding a needle in a needle stack should be pretty straightforward... as long as you aren't looking for any "specific" needle.


RE: The definition of irony...
By ImSpartacus on 3/23/2008 4:05:27 PM , Rating: 2
Have you ever tried to mess with a needle stack? It took my appendix 8 weeks to start working again.


RE: The definition of irony...
By sporr on 3/23/2008 8:14:22 AM , Rating: 2
ouch.


RE: The definition of irony...
By walk2k on 3/20/2008 7:20:13 PM , Rating: 5
and then the next time you put a new disc in the player the keys for the cracked disc will be invalidated automatically and won't play in that player any more.

seriously people. BD+ was MADE to be cracked. they thought of that.


RE: The definition of irony...
By teldar on 3/20/2008 8:48:45 PM , Rating: 3
I believe the point is you have a BD player in your computer and you can decode and export the stream. You know, copy it. It's not like they're talking about altering the bios of the player, they're talking about bypassing the security so a computer can decode it.


RE: The definition of irony...
By omnicronx on 3/20/2008 11:49:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You know, copy it. It's not like they're talking about altering the bios of the player, they're talking about bypassing the security so a computer can decode it.
And hes saying, when you put in a new store bought BD which contains new updated keys into your standalone BD player, the cracked keys will no longer work. Not sure if this is true, but i think i remember hearing something similar.

What good is a BD if you can only play it from a computer, most people don't have HDMI out, and it is very hard to set up lossless sound.


RE: The definition of irony...
By walk2k on 3/21/2008 12:26:34 PM , Rating: 2
computer players are no different than stand-alone players.

maybe you can rip the stream and convert it to DIVX or something, but only at a loss of quality.

of course that's probably what the bittorrents will do anyway.


RE: The definition of irony...
By Noya on 3/20/2008 11:25:20 PM , Rating: 2
Can't you just not connect the monitor my use...I mean Ethernet port?


RE: The definition of irony...
By boogle on 3/21/2008 5:33:25 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
and then the next time you put a new disc in the player the keys for the cracked disc will be invalidated automatically and won't play in that player any more.


So you transcode the movie so there's 0 remnants of the original encryption - Sony are going to find out the cracked keys... how?

To put it another way, I pick up a car with various ID numbers on the chassis. I'm going to 'clone' this car, so in the process I put new plates on it, and sand off all the ID numbers. How is the original manufacturer (or anyone for that matter) going to know what the numbers were?


RE: The definition of irony...
By rninneman on 3/21/2008 10:18:38 AM , Rating: 4
AnyDVD removes all traces of copy protection from the disc so the player has no "keys" to even bother with at all.

You are think of Media Key Blocking which is designed to revoke compromised player keys. For example, PC software players, such as PowerDVD and WinDVD, were first utilized to crack AACS. Shortly afterwards, movies released with a new MKB table revoking the keys of the compromised players.

While BD+ will most certainly change over time. DVD copy protection still changes and Slysoft is all over the updates on a regular basis so I have no doubt that anything the studios do will be futile.


RE: The definition of irony...
By Bogus1 on 3/26/2008 11:00:53 PM , Rating: 2
If you keep the price of the blank media near the cost of the movie, it isn't cost effective to copy.

1 blank $15
1 hour to rip and burn (guestimate)
1 Sheet of photo paper for the cover + ink
1 clam shell
time searching for, or scanning, or creating cover art.

Personally, my time(that it takes to copy)is worth more than the cost of the $25 movie.

as always, your mileage may vary.


RE: The definition of irony...
By glennpratt on 3/27/2008 1:48:03 PM , Rating: 3
For many of us, this isn't about piracy, it's about re-encoding movies for our portable devices, streaming it to other devices in our house or backup to storage array. It's about letting me play movies I paid for on devices without HDCP encryption and a Blu-ray drive.

Most pirates don't care about HD yet anyway. The 'pirates' I know watch movies compressed far below DVD quality and couldn't care less. It's just some strange obsession with collecting movies for free.


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