backtop


Print 99 comment(s) - last by Fnoob.. on Mar 11 at 4:59 PM


  (Source: MPAA)
MPAA reports that 2007 saw one of the highest grossing years for the motion picture industry

The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) relentlessly bombards the public with copyright and piracy information.  It plagued the news media for years with tireless finger pointing; even its own website is dedicated to giving the public information on copyright laws and piracy.  Different sections, such as Movie Thieves, offer information on who the criminals are and asks individuals to help in their “fight to stop movie thieves!”

The confusing part is the link in the “Latest News” section that claims an all-time high in domestic and global box office sales.  The global market grew 4.9% to $26.6 billion, claims the MPAA, and the U.S. domestic market grew roughly 5.4%, passing the $9.6 billion mark.

“From the threat and eventual reality of a writer’s strike to the global impact of film theft to concerns over the economy, the film industry faced significant challenges in 2007,” stated Dan Glickman, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the MPAA. “But, ultimately, we got our Hollywood ending. Once again, diverse, quality films and the timeless allure of the movie house proved a winning combination with consumers around the world.”

It is surprising to see the MPAA claim that the motion picture industry is taking a beating from piracy when their own data shows that the market is producing better than before. This is not to say, however, that piracy doesn't have an effect on the film industry.

According to a study done by the Institute for Public Innovation, motion picture piracy costs the U.S. economy about $20.5 billion annually which includes revenue and “related measures of economic performance”.  The related measure includes loss of jobs, decrease in earning for workers, and the U.S. governments loss of tax revenue.  The study claims that film industry would have added a little over 45,000 new jobs.

Even though the film industry is taking some large hits from piracy, you can rest a little easier knowing that the industry is still raking in quite a sum of cash.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

High ticket prices.
By ajvitaly on 3/7/2008 11:48:07 AM , Rating: 2
Blame the high ticket prices on the Denzel Washingtons and Tom Cruises and Chris Tuckers (among others) - actors that REFUSE to star in movies for less than $20 million. And shame on us for continuing to pay to see them.




RE: High ticket prices.
By smilingcrow on 3/7/2008 12:38:06 PM , Rating: 1
“Blame the high ticket prices on the Denzel Washingtons and Tom Cruises and Chris Tuckers (among others) - actors that REFUSE to star in movies for less than $20 million. And shame on us for continuing to pay to see them.”

Am I supposed to ask at the multiplex how much the actors get paid for their current film so that I can boycott those that earn ‘too much’?
Provided I don’t pay more for a Tom Snooze film why should I care how much he was paid? It’s as meaningless as saying that I should boycott films that cost over $100M to produce. If it costs me the same to view then I’m not concerned.

If you want to shame anyone then try shaming the studios for paying the actors so much. If they all said FU to the money grabbers then they wouldn’t have to over pay them.


RE: High ticket prices.
By joemoedee on 3/11/2008 4:37:33 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Blame the high ticket prices on the Denzel Washingtons and Tom Cruises and Chris Tuckers (among others) - actors that REFUSE to star in movies for less than $20 million. And shame on us for continuing to pay to see them.


Well, there's someone, somewhere, eager to write them the 20 million dollar check, that has much more money than any of those actors. Combined.

Same thing with professional sports. People complain that salaries are so high, yet its the owner reaping the major rewards, not the players.

As long as people continue to fork out the money to see them, they'll keep raising the price of admission.

Blame the powers that be, not the employees trying to get their piece of the action.


"We’re Apple. We don’t wear suits. We don’t even own suits." -- Apple CEO Steve Jobs











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki