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Battleship would be invisible to the eye, radar, produce no heat signature and make no sound

The ultimate in camouflage for military purposes would be complete invisibility. Invisibility has been a major factor in fiction going back to ancient Greek mythologies to contemporary science fiction. While we are far away from space ships capable of intergalactic travel like Stargate Atlantis, a clocking device may be closer than you think.

Metamaterials refract light at a negative angle, rather than refracting light like normal materials that can be seen. The properties of metamaterials allow scientists to bend light around objects making them invisible to the naked eye. DailyTech reported on similar technology before when researchers at the University of Maryland were able to cloak a small 10 micrometer circle making it invisible to the eye.

While 10 micrometers is incredibly small, the scientists hope to one day scale the size of the cloak to hide people and objects. This is exactly what researchers at the Britannia Royal Navy College hope to do, but on a much grander scale. The scientist are developing a method to render full battleships invisible to not only the naked eye, but to radar as well. The researchers also hope to mask the sound produced by the ships as well as its heat signature.

If the scientists are able to accomplish the goal, it would mean the British Navy would have battleships invisible to the naked eye, radar, heat-seeking missiles and that produce no noise. If successful, the only indication that the ship is coming would be the water displaced by the ship.



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RE: If it's invisible...
By joegee on 3/5/2008 5:17:51 PM , Rating: 4
Off the top of my head:

biological science and medicine

genetic engineering
- gene mapping
- gene sequencing and manufacturing
- genome mapping
proteome studies
- protein folding
- enzyme chemistry
cellular metabolism and mechanisms
- mitosis and meiosis processes
- metabolic cycles
- organelle function
stem cell research
- human cell development
- human organ development
- transplant studies
general medicine
- increasingly effective medications
- tailored medications
- increased survivability / geriatric sciences
- antiviral medications
neurology
- better understanding of neural networks
- sophisticated brain imaging / mapping techniques

nanomaterial science
- atomic assembly / manipulation
- atomic imaging
- rapid analysis
- fullerenes and other carbon nanostructures

material science
- silicon plastics
- high temperature superconductivity
- high strength magnets
- phase change materials
- memory materials
- rapid prototyping
- "metamaterials" with negative refractive properties
- high strength plastics
- high temperature ceramics

miniaturization
- micron scale transistors
- leds and other emitters
- non-digital analog machines

high speed computing
- rapid information manipulation
- graphical representation of complex data sets
- networking, and near-universal information access
- advanced voice and text communication systems

artificial intelligence
- expert systems
- sophisticated modelling systems
- sophisticated search algorhythms
- high speed control systems
- accurate simulations

mathematics
- information manipulation and compression
- fractal mathematics
- chaos theory

physics
- real world applications of known physical phenomena: nuclear magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography, quantum tunneling, atomic decay
- supersymmetry (and loop quantum gravity)
- lasers and collimated radiation
- tokomaks and fusion research

space science
- satellite communications
- manned space flight
- space-based experimentation
- space-based observation platforms

This is roughly fifteen minutes of thought. I'm certain there are many, many more advances others can add.

-Joe G.


"Death Is Very Likely The Single Best Invention Of Life" -- Steve Jobs

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