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ASUS Eee PC 900  (Source: ASUS)
ASUS to offer new options with the Eee PC 900

Last week, official details began to trickle out concerning ASUS' new Eee PC 900 sub-notebook. Today, ASUS’s CEO opened the floodgates when it comes to specifications for its second generation Eee PC notebook.

As previously reported, the new Eee PC 900 features a new 8.9” 1024x600 display in place of the 800x480 display found on the original Eee PC 401. The larger screen with a higher resolution should help to silence some of the more vocal critics who bemoaned the needs to constantly scroll horizontally and vertically to read webpages.

Another change with the new Eee PC 900 comes in the area of storage. The original Eee PC first was made available with 4GB of storage. As the months progressed, ASUS released 2GB and 8GB models to occupy lower and higher price points respectively.

ASUS CEO Jerry Shen revealed to Laptop Magazine that the Eee PC 900 will be available in an 8GB version with Windows XP while versions running Xandros Linux will be available in 12GB or 20GB capacities. ASUS will also provide users with the options of using traditional HDDs in the future. “In June and April we will only support solid-state drives,” said Shen. “Hard drives will be options at a later date.”

ASUS will also make some changes on the processor front with the Eee PC 900. It appears that early versions of the Eee PC 900 will continue to use the 900MHz Intel Celeron M processor. However, ASUS will be moving to Intel’s Atom processors shortly after launch.

“From my view point, Diamondville is the better choice, because it uses the 45 nanometer processor. And price-wise it is very competitive. In my planning I will continue to use Intel’s Diamondville,” added Shen. “And for the VIA one I think from the power point of view, Diamondville is still better. In May, these machines will be hitting the market.”

When it comes to power, ASUS is looking to change things a bit. The company plans to introduce a new power adapter that will be smaller than the already tiny one included on the first generation Eee PC. The new power adapter will dramatically reduce the charging time of the device and will be available on both 7” and 8.9” models.

ASUS will also boost the battery life with the introduction of Intel Atom processors. Intel's Celeron M -- currently used in the Eee PC and early Eee PC 900 models -- doesn't employ any real power-saving measures like SpeedStep. As a result, battery life hovers around the 2.5 hour to 3.5 hour range. The introduction of Intel's Atom processors should greatly improve battery life on the Eee PC 900. "In the near future, we also are trying to support one-day computing which would provide more than 8 hours. I think in May we might be closer to providing that," continued Shen.

Users will be glad to learn that ASUS kept all of the external ports that were found on the original Eee PC -- that means that three USB 2.0 ports, 10/100 NIC, VGA port, headphone/microphone jacks and SD/SDHC media reader litter the exterior of the device. ASUS also wisely upgraded the integrated webcam from 0.3MP to 1.3MP. Shen also noted that built-in WiMAX and HSDPA options will be available during Q3.

ASUS plans to continue offering the second generation Eee PC in a variety of colors. The current version is available in white, black, blue, green, and pink. Future color choices “will really reflect the New York City and London city style” according to Shen.

ASUS’ CEO went on to add that the new Eee PC will start at roughly $499 when it launches this April in the U.S. For more information, you can check out the full interview with Laptop Magazine here.



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RE: getting expensive
By nomagic on 3/10/2008 1:59:34 AM , Rating: 3
I don't think they are trying to move upmarket or compete with full-sized laptops. Also, the "you can get a real laptop" argument is getting old. They are just charging premiums to those who can afford the more feature-rich models. There is a distinct difference.

I agree that they can and should make Eee PCs cheaper. However, despite the high prices, the new models will still sell like hot cakes. How to make more of these Eee PCs is currently more important than how to make them cheaper.

We will probably never see competitively priced Eee PCs until they have some real competition.


RE: getting expensive
By Gul Westfale on 3/10/2008 2:23:44 AM , Rating: 2
*waits for the VIA nanobook*

btw, i googled upgrading the hard drive and found a site where a guy details soldering a flashdrive to the motherboards' USB leads... all on the inside of the PC. kinda pointless since sticking in an SDHC card gets you the same result, but i still found it interesting.


RE: getting expensive
By ineedaname on 3/10/2008 5:46:46 AM , Rating: 2
I agree with nomagic. The fact is that this is just not the same as a full sized laptop and can't be compared in the same way. If you go check out 15" laptops and compare them to 11" - 12" laptops with the same specs you will see a price jump. People want it so that they can easily carry their computer in one hand yet have a decent size monitor. This 8.9" is a sweet spot. Not everyone will agree with this but the fact is that the majority of people will pay for the size. Just look at macbook air.

If you think the hard drive is small then I think you've misunderstood what this laptop was intended for. It was intended for a person on the go to take notes access email and surf the web. It wasn't meant to replace your home computer where you put the majority of your files. The hdd is meant to be rugged and use low power. If you need drive space u can just use the SDHC slot since u can probably find 64gb SD cards for cheap soon.

With Intel Atom the specs should be more comparable to a regular laptop now. Atom even comes in dual core. The TDP of Atom is about 4-8watt and below 1watt for diamondville. That is from about 20-26watt on Celeron M which should greatly increase battery life.

For the price there really isn't anything quite like this new EEEPC. If you go check out UMPC's in general they can easily go for over 1k.


RE: getting expensive
By ineedaname on 3/10/2008 5:57:03 AM , Rating: 2
Er my bad got mixed up between Diamondville and Silverthorn Silverthorn is sub 1watt while Diamond is 4-8.

Also the Celeron M in the original eepc is a 5watt version. So it doesn't seem that the cpu will help increase battery life that drastically. Although the newer cpu has speedstep and probably has some deep sleep power stages.


RE: getting expensive
By IntelUser2000 on 3/10/2008 8:10:14 AM , Rating: 2
Diamondville doesn't feature SpeedStep which is why the TDP is much higher. Silverthorne will come in 0.6W to 2.5W variants. They obtained the feature using a synthetic power virus code(code designed to maximize the power consumption of a CPU), so I guess you can say the TDP represents the max power.


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