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Print 73 comment(s) - last by Oregonian2.. on Feb 25 at 3:44 PM


The Optimus Maximus - All $1564 US dollars worth.

The IBM Model M, Part 1391401 - A better typing experience, just not as flashy.
$1564 buys you everything but the simplest feature - typing

DailyTech has been following the long-winded saga of the Optimus Maximus keyboard for over two years now, from its initial unveilings to the last update in May 2007 of the "pre-preorder" date -- but the final hardware has been completed, sent for shipping, and even delivered to the eager fingers of reviewers at Engadget.

Unfortunately, the reviewers weren't completely impressed. While the preliminary report from Engadget praised the brilliant OLED keys, the major selling feature of the keyboard, the sturdy construction and high-quality building materials, the review team was let down by a flaw in the fundamentals of the Optimus Maximus.

"Typing on [the Optimus Maximus], well, sucks," was the blunt assessment from the Engadget review team. "... As a whole it just requires way too much force to depress keys ... Let's put it this way, we sit around and type all day long and this thing wore us out in about 30 seconds to a minute. Carpal sufferers, beware."

More reviews should be rolling in shortly -- but if the Engadget preview is any indication, the "ultimate keyboard" may have gotten so carried up with special features that the basic functionality was left out.

However, it does stand to reason that anyone able to spend the wallet-busting $1,564 USD for the Optimus Maximus could certainly afford to pick up an old IBM Model M 1391401 as their primary unit for typing.


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RE: At this price
By littlebitstrouds on 2/22/2008 11:52:33 PM , Rating: 4
ZOMG, it costs more money to buy a CD burner and burn the disc, what a useless technology. This was an augment once... Why is stupidity running wild here. Just cause it's a first time product offering, doesn't mean the damn concept is flawed. My God people, wait for it to get cheaper and you'll all want one. Is it me, or is this fact not painfully obvious?

As per what the responses should be:
Oh man, that's awesome. I can't wait until the technology gets cheaper and I can use one of these in my own home.


RE: At this price
By marsbound2024 on 2/23/2008 12:04:55 AM , Rating: 2
I don't think no one is saying that it isn't a neat and usable concept. The fact is that it is a $1564 keyboard that displays pictures and allows you to program the keys to do different things than just "A" or "B" or whatever. We have better things to do with our money at the moment. I'll want one when it is below $100.

So I don't think it is stupidity sir... the facts are:
Apparently OLED tech has not matured enough to be viable in consumer products that are as simple and cheap as a keyboard.
If they want a product like this to be competitive, they probably should have considered OTHER means of making a programmable keyboard like this. It is pretty cheap to make such small LCD/LED screens that function exactly like this does. Think of the BIOS error code screens on some motherboards. It isn't that expensive to make. If you have to have beautiful color, it is still cheap.

How much does the average 17" or 19" LCD monitor cost nowadays? Cheap right? Now think of the area needed for a keyboard that shows pictures like this one. Not anywhere near that much area. So... even cheaper! Why the $1564 price tag? THAT'S why we are all so negative about it. The concept is great... the price tag and the execution of that concept... not as much.


RE: At this price
By masher2 (blog) on 2/23/2008 2:59:21 PM , Rating: 2
> "How much does the average 17" or 19" LCD monitor cost nowadays? Cheap right? Now think of the area needed for a keyboard that shows pictures like this one"

Think of the thickness of your average LCD screen (generally about 2 inches) then add to that key travel space, and you've got an extremely bulky item. Not to mention the fact that each individual key would need its own light source, LCD driver circuitry, and so on. OLED screens are generally about the same cost as LCD for very small screen sizes...which (along with size and battery life) is why you see them in so many small devices.


RE: At this price
By littlebitstrouds on 2/23/2008 11:47:13 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I don't think no one is saying that it isn't a neat and usable concept. The fact is that it is a $1564 keyboard that displays pictures and allows you to program the keys to do different things than just "A" or "B" or whatever. We have better things to do with our money at the moment. I'll want one when it is below $100.


quote:
So I don't think it is stupidity sir... the facts are: Apparently OLED tech has not matured enough to be viable in consumer products that are as simple and cheap as a keyboard.


I'm confused... you just agreed with me but pretended it was a rebutle.


RE: At this price
By marsbound2024 on 2/24/2008 12:06:40 AM , Rating: 2
I agreed with part of what you said. The concept is great, but we aren't being stupid as you said. Everybody is so up in arms because of the cost. The fact is, why even introduce it yet when it is obvious OLED must not be mature enough and cost-effective in something so simple as a keyboard. It's not stupidity on our part at all.

So sure, we will all love the technology and probably do right now. But very few will pay $1564 for this keyboard. That is why you are seeing people making comments against this thing.


RE: At this price
By littlebitstrouds on 2/25/2008 12:21:41 AM , Rating: 2
Remind me to introduce something only when it meets your price point.


"A lot of people pay zero for the cellphone ... That's what it's worth." -- Apple Chief Operating Officer Timothy Cook

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