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The decision by AOL and Yahoo to charge a bulk e-mailing fee has not been well received by many

Several public interest groups and nonprofit organizations, including Gun Owners of America, Association of Cancer Online Resources and MoveOn.org, are joining together to battle the decision by America Online and Yahoo to charge a bulk e-mailing fee.  The "certified e-mail" service would attach "tokens" to some e-mails in which senders would have to pay between one-quarter of 1 cent and 1 cent for each message sent.  These e-mails will bypass spam filters and be sent directly into a user's inbox. 

The fee will be a disadvantage to "charities, small businesses and even families with mailing lists that will have no guarantee their e-mail will be delivered," said Adam Green, a spokesman for MoveOn.org Civic Action, the group's nonpolitical arm. "The magic of the Internet is that it is free and open to everybody so small ideas can become big ideas."

AOL users can look forward to these certified e-mails in the next 30 days or so.  It is not currently known when Yahoo will begin offering certified e-mails to its users.

Update 02/28/2006: Since publication of this article, Yahoo! representatives have contacted us with more information.

"Companies can continue to send e-mail to Yahoo! Mail users at no cost in exactly the same way they always have, and we are not planning to require payment to ensure delivery to our users. In the coming months, Yahoo! will test an optional certified e-mail program based on 'transactional' messages only, such as bank statements and purchase receipts, as an additional layer of protection against e-mail identity theft scams known as phishing attacks," said Karen Mahon, Yahoo! spokesperson.


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The most dangerous part is ...
By pixelslave on 2/28/2006 9:30:06 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
In the coming months, Yahoo! will test an optional certified e-mail program based on 'transactional' messages only, such as bank statements and purchase receipts, as an additional layer of protection against e-mail identity theft scams known as phishing attacks,


The most dangerous part is the word "transactional" -- if all e-mail providers employ similar techniques, we will soon see a surcharge from our bank to send us statement thru e-mails! I think this whole damn thing is caused by people complaining too much without knowing that no perfect solution exists, and then some genius thought that they have the most brilliant idea to fight the problem and make some profits out of it.

Is spam such a big problem? Yes. Is it such a problem that it can't be reduced to a more manageable level? No. Spam filters, personal black/white list, challenge/response are all effective techniques. It won't solve all the spam problems, but from a personal point of view, they reduce the effect of spam. The ISP/e-mail providers suffer the most because even if we don't see the spam in our in-box, they still pay for the traffic. They make it sounds like they are solving the problems for us, but in fact, they are solving their own problems.




RE: The most dangerous part is ...
By masher2 (blog) on 2/28/06, Rating: 0
By slashdotcomma on 2/28/2006 10:41:16 PM , Rating: 2
bravo masher2!


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