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AMD's desktop platforms detail the switch from AM2+ to AM3  (Source: AMD)

Desktop offerings from AMD will largely include dual and tri-core K10 processors  (Source: AMD)

Not willing to yield anything to Centrino, AMD's "Puma" and "Shrike" initiatives will bundle all of the company's newest mobile technology into one ubiquitous platform  (Source: AMD)
Long gone is the talk of 4x4; AMD discusses its platform programs with a mainstream approach

AMD yesterday held its 2007 Financial Analyst Day in which it revealed its updated corporate roadmap. AMD has a flurry of new platform releases planned out for 2008, 2009 and 2010 and, contrary to previous analysts days, the company had no problem detailing its initiatives in full depth.

AMD’s recent Spider launch marked AMD’s first foray into the enthusiast market with its next-generation K10 architecture. AMD, however, has two more enthusiast platforms planned out for 2008 and 2009.

Towards the second half of 2008 AMD will release its second K10-based Enthusiast platform, dubbed Leo. Leo will feature quad- and triple-core 45nm Deneb and Propus cores manufactured on a 45nm process node. The chips will support DDR2 memory, HT 3.0 and run on the same AM2+ package as current Phenom processors. The platform launch will also consist of 790FX/790/770 chipsets with SB700 south bridges, and AMD’s new R600-based graphics processors.

In the first half of 2009, AMD plans to update its Leo platform. The largest change in the "Leo refresh" will be AMD’s move to DDR3 and the new AM3 package. The platform launch will also consist of a new RD890 chipset with the SB800 south bridge. AMD will also launch its next-generation ATI R700-series graphics processors at this time.

AMD also announced its new mainstream desktop platform, dubbed Cartwheel, scheduled for quarter of 2008. The launch will consist of quad-, triple-,and dual-core K10-based Toliman and Kuma cores. The new chips will be manufactured on a 65nm process node. AMD’s RS780 DX10 integrated graphics chipset will also be launched along with optional R600-series graphics processors with Hybrid Graphics functionality and Vista Premium certification.

In short, AMD’s Hybrid Graphics technology permits users to combine integrated graphics with specific discrete graphics cards that support Hybrid Graphics to form a cost-efficient CrossFire.

In 2009, AMD will refresh its Cartwheel platform with 45nm quad-, triple-, and dual-core Popus, Heka and Regor cores. Mimicking AMD’s update schedule for its enthusiast platform, the refreshed Carthwheel platform will support DDR3 memory and come based on the AM3 interface. The platform features an RS780 chipset with a new SB800 south bridge along with optional R700-series graphics processors and Hybrid Graphics Technology.

Two is the number of the day, and that is no exception when talking about AMD’s mobile platform roadmap.

In Q1 2008 AMD will introduce its Puma notebook platform. The platform launch will sport new dual-core Griffin processors along with the AMD RS780 chipset and integrated DirectX 10 graphics via AMD’s M8x graphics chip.
In 2009, AMD will elevate its game plan in the mobile segment with the release of its first Fusion-derived mobile chips.  Consumers will begin seeing the first fruits of AMD’s Fusion efforts, which AMD has touted for over a year now.  

The Shrike platform launch will feature AMD’s third-generation Stars core dubbed Swift. Swift, manufactured on a 45nm process node, will feature three K10 microprocessor cores and one graphics processor core. The platform will also feature M9x graphics with integrated DirectX 10 support along with support for DDR3.  Like other AMD technologies, the Swift's shift to DDR3 will require a new socket, dubbed FS1.

Absent from these roadmaps is the AMD 4x4 initiative.  AMD announced it will no longer pursue the knocked-down server platform for desktop enthusiasts last month -- just one year after it announced plans for three more generations of the technology.


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I identify AMD with best value offerings
By bupkus on 12/14/2007 3:05:22 PM , Rating: 4
As I read about AMD using DDR2 until atleast 2009 I continue to appreciate AMD as the supplier for my own needs... that being machines at the economy end. AFAI care let Intel(for now) dominate the high end. I NEVER buy in that price range and don't expect I ever will. Sure, I wish I were rich but in all reality I never will be. I am so glad, even by circumstance, that there is a company(AMD)who will provide(or be associated with) cheap mobos with decent IGPs using the cheaper DDR2 memory. This price range is my world and probably the world of so many out there.
If I could get a C2D and mobo for < $100 I sure would, but why should Intel? They simply don't need guys like me.
It's kinda like cable TV. While there are so many who pay over $100/mo for cable tv why care about peeps like me? Now if there were 2 cable suppliers to my hood it might be different... maybe.
Please, I know about satelite.




By wut on 12/14/2007 4:14:19 PM , Rating: 2
If Intel "doesn't care" then why did it spend so much resources on the Silverthorne project? If it "doesn't care" then why proliferate Core architecture all the way down into Celerons ?

If it "doesn't care" then why bother shipping all those integrated graphics products?

That's all the indication one needs to say that Intel has the eyes on the entire market, and not just high end... because it needs to grow in order to appease stockholders, and it'd "grow" right into AMD's territory if it has to.


"I mean, if you wanna break down someone's door, why don't you start with AT&T, for God sakes? They make your amazing phone unusable as a phone!" -- Jon Stewart on Apple and the iPhone

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