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Power pads, which use magnetic induction, are already on the market, like the Palm Pre's chargin Touchstone, shown here. They only work over short distances, though, and require custom form factors.  (Source: Wojianfe.net)

Witricity uses magnetically couple resonance to transmit power over longer distances, as shown here. The company's CEO predicts the company's technology will be ubiquitous within five years. However, health concerns about the powerful magnet fields it uses remain.  (Source: Business Unusual)
Company believes that computers, phones, and EVs will within 5 years be operating without cords

You can't fault WiTricity for its ambition.  As one of several companies looking to market emerging wireless power transmission technologies, WiTricity is making some of the boldest claims.  Among the claims made by the company -- that within a year wireless power will be taking the mobile electronics industry by storm.

The concept of wireless power transmission is a relatively old one.  In the 1890s, Nikolai Tesla was successful in illuminating incandescent light bulbs with wirelessly transmitted power.  However, for decades this research lay dormant and untouched.

With modern telecommunications and interest in signals at an all time high, interest in the topic again picked up.  The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in particular, developed some intriguing technology that WiTricity would later be founded upon.

Eric Giler, CEO of WiTricity says that power transmission over several feet is an obtainable feat.  He states, "Five years from now, this will seem completely normal.  The biggest effect of wireless power is attacking that huge energy wasting that goes on where people buy disposable batteries.  [And] Electric cars [are] absolutely gorgeous, but does anyone really want to plug them in?"

WiTricity isn't the only player in this new market, though.  Several key technologies, each championed by different companies, are emerging.

One is radio power.  Though only able to transmit small amounts of power, this approach can work over a long distance.  A Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, company called Powercast is among the pioneers in this field, using its technology to power temperature sensors in large office buildings and to power wireless Christmas trees (sold for $400 a piece).  The company has lit up an LED with radio signals from 1.5 miles away.

Another approach is power pads.  Advantages include low costs and relatively high efficiencies.  Disadvantages include the extremely short distance and need for custom shapes and sizes of pads.  This technology currently is employed in the Palm Pre's recharging stone and in electric toothbrush recharging stands.

WiTricity's technology works on a third type of transmission -- magnetically coupled resonance.  Similar to sound waves, the transmission creates a magnetic field, that devices can convert locally to electricity.  This technology enjoys a middle ground with a bit worse efficiency, a bit longer distance, and moderate costs.  Intel is also working on a more efficient version of this approach.

Despite WiTricity's optimism about its new approach, challenges remain.  A full deployment is estimated to possibly create a magnetic field as strong as the Earth's own magnetic field.  According to recent research, referenced by Menno Treffers, chairman of the steering group at the Wireless Power Consortium, such a strong magnetic field can cause serious health risks.



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In other news ...
By randomposter on 9/3/2009 9:32:46 AM , Rating: 5
We'll all be riding magical flying ponies to work within a year.




RE: In other news ...
By amanojaku on 9/3/2009 9:37:04 AM , Rating: 5
Some of us already do. *cough*


RE: In other news ...
By bubbastrangelove on 9/3/2009 9:54:55 AM , Rating: 5
You're Sigma Chi name wouldn't happen to be "yak" at Pitt in '97 would it?

You still owe me for those mushrooms.


RE: In other news ...
By RU482 on 9/3/2009 11:44:41 AM , Rating: 3
thank you for that comment


RE: In other news ...
By CollegeTechGuy on 9/7/2009 4:48:17 PM , Rating: 1
Back to topic, as these blog replies seem to take over real replies...

What is the efficiency of this technology? Seems like we would be wasting a TON of energy transmitting it everywhere. Basically the Sun is doing the same thing, and we will never harness its full potential. So why should we waste our planets resources broadcasting electricity where it will be wasted.


RE: In other news ...
By Einy0 on 9/3/2009 7:12:53 PM , Rating: 2
Oh crap that was me. Sorry man, I can pay you next week.

lol...


RE: In other news ...
By swatX on 9/5/2009 8:17:21 PM , Rating: 2
you are in sigma chi?


RE: In other news ...
By FITCamaro on 9/3/2009 12:06:46 PM , Rating: 1
Your fantasies while on mushrooms don't count. ;)


RE: In other news ...
By marvdmartian on 9/3/2009 9:37:06 AM , Rating: 5
And the people in that bottom photo will have a 2nd head growing from their shoulders!! ;)


RE: In other news ...
By EasyC on 9/3/2009 12:46:44 PM , Rating: 2
So THAT's how they did that in Evil Dead 2.....


RE: In other news ...
By EasyC on 9/3/2009 1:40:15 PM , Rating: 2
I mean Army of Darkness. My bad.


RE: In other news ...
By StevoLincolnite on 9/3/2009 9:38:16 AM , Rating: 2
*Whilst wearing a Tuu Tuu and playing the Banjo like a hippy.


RE: In other news ...
By Camikazi on 9/3/2009 3:26:18 PM , Rating: 2
Silly Hippies play Mandolins, the cast of Deliverance play Banjos :P


RE: In other news ...
By docmilo on 9/3/2009 9:44:04 AM , Rating: 4
And within 2 years half the population will be suffering from the Black Shakes from NAS.


RE: In other news ...
By Chernobyl68 on 9/3/2009 3:59:26 PM , Rating: 2
+1 for the Johnny Mnemonic reference.


RE: In other news ...
By axeman1957 on 9/3/2009 9:58:00 AM , Rating: 4
Hey, Al Gore can't be the only one who makes crazy claims.

Not only will all power be wireless in 5 years, but in 10 years 100% of that power will come from green energy.


RE: In other news ...
By Legolias24 on 9/3/2009 10:30:08 AM , Rating: 5
quote:
Hey, Al Gore can't be the only one who makes crazy claims.


Beware of Man-bear-pig! :P


RE: In other news ...
By zkln on 9/3/2009 6:28:56 PM , Rating: 3
Are you cereal?


RE: In other news ...
By S3anister on 9/7/2009 3:39:45 PM , Rating: 2
super-duper cereal.

COME ON GUYZ


RE: In other news ...
By c4xp on 9/3/09, Rating: -1
RE: In other news ...
By MrBlastman on 9/3/2009 12:57:57 PM , Rating: 2
While it sounds far-fetched, you can string up a long wire in your back yard and draw power from the ambient atmosphere already if you wanted to--the power would be coming from radio waves that are all around us. It might not be a lot of power that you can receive, but it is possible already without this companies technology.

I've been curious about wireless power transmission for a few years and have looked into it a bit. The idea of magnetic induction for the transfer is quite novel and fascinating at the same time. What it will do to people's health? I'm not so sure about that yet. An MRI machine works through magnetics by changing the spin rate and alignment of your hydrogen atoms. I don't think though they have tested what would happen to a person if they're stuck in the MRI machine for several months or years (I think someone would have to be insane to sit in the machine for that long--you'd know what I'm talking about if you've ever had the displeasure of laying in one).

The MRI machine is an extreme example--I've seen objects levitated by magnetics alone but these are hugely strong fields. What this induction principle proposes is a smaller field but it is a field nontheless. I think this tech will take more than 5 years to overcome everyone's fears.

There's a Wireless chrismas tree that was on sale a few years back, I'd love to check one out.


RE: In other news ...
By randomposter on 9/3/2009 1:01:27 PM , Rating: 3
From what I've heard, if you live in a house backing onto a high-voltage transmission corridor, you can (clandestinely I would imagine) bury a transformer coil underground beneath the high-tension lines and run cables back to your house. Can't claim I've ever done this but apparently you can "wirelessly" sap a fair bit of power using this technique.


RE: In other news ...
By JediJeb on 9/3/2009 1:44:04 PM , Rating: 3
I read a story about twenty years ago about someone actually doing that, placing a coil under a high power transmission line and using it to power his house. He did get caught though because it does actually draw power from the lines that the power company can measure. While searching for the problem in their lines they discovered his setup and the guy was fined for stealing electricity.

The transmission of electricity does produce stray magnetic fields, but once you convert them back into electricity it causes a net loss in the electricity that creates the field. This is not like converting radio waves into electricity though as those are actually propogating energy waves and not an EM field.


RE: In other news ...
By ArcliteHawaii on 9/3/2009 5:31:38 PM , Rating: 4
Right, so two things concern me:

1. The health issues with creating high powered magnetic fields. Children living in homes that had fields greater than 0.4 microtesla (µT) showed increased rates of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. And only a few illnesses have been studied in regards to high level EMFs.

2. What is the efficiency with something like this? It seems that a lot of electricity might be being wasted creating these fields. Also, what is the efficiency of the device to utilize the electricity?


RE: In other news ...
By MrBlastman on 9/3/2009 1:47:28 PM , Rating: 2
I've taken my trifield meter (nifty little toy you can buy at Fry's btw) and when I go under high-tension lines it goes through the ROOF. I thought of the same thing when I discovered that. I think though that Mythbusters tried this and found it partly plausible--though it would require thousands of pounds of wire in order to do so.

I haven't seen the episode though, only heard of it. According to wikipedia it was cut from the show, probably due to it being considered illegal. I can't see how it would be--if the power company lets power leak into the atmosphere, you're doing the world a service by helping to contain ambient radiation. Oh well.

At least according to my meter the amount of power and em radiation being emitted is enormous when you get under them.


RE: In other news ...
By Camikazi on 9/3/2009 3:29:01 PM , Rating: 3
Drifting aimlessly into the atmosphere is ok, drifting into your house without paying the company is illegal. Until they learn how to charge the atmosphere for stealing it they will just charge us for doing it instead :P


RE: In other news ...
By Nobleman00 on 9/3/2009 5:44:05 PM , Rating: 3
I think the problem is, how do you lay many pounds of wire under the lines, and into your place without trespassing on someone else's property.

Now if the wires are running over my yard... and you happen to see a giant coil of copper wire on my lawn, that's just some yard art.


RE: In other news ...
By FaaR on 9/4/2009 5:14:13 AM , Rating: 5
Power lines don't actually leak power into the surrounding atmosphere. While they do create magnetic fields, these are essentially quite inert until you introduce a conductor into said field to induce a current.

So you don't simply gather up otherwise wasted electricity with a coil placed beneath a power line; you actually actively leech from the transmission line. It's the same thing as if you'd drill a hole in a water mains to tap it without paying the water company.


RE: In other news ...
By Ammohunt on 9/4/2009 6:55:07 PM , Rating: 2
You sure it wasn't ghosts hanging out under the power lines? did try and record some EVP's?


RE: In other news ...
By rcc on 9/4/2009 12:29:56 PM , Rating: 4
Hmm, and you can use the money you save to help pay for the kids medical bills. : )


RE: In other news ...
By kaoken on 9/3/09, Rating: 0
RE: In other news ...
By MrBlastman on 9/3/09, Rating: 0
RE: In other news ...
By randomposter on 9/3/2009 4:47:05 PM , Rating: 4
It's all a matter of dosage my friend. Radon gas is also produced naturally by the earth in some locations. Does that mean you'd be okay being exposed to high concentrations of radon for the next couple years?


Hollywood shows up in science again
By jrollins on 9/3/2009 9:41:37 AM , Rating: 2
Im not the most informed person about this subject, but to me, having a magnetic field as strong as the the Earth's (field) doesnt sound like a good idea. The "Core" anyone?




RE: Hollywood shows up in science again
By Mitch101 on 9/3/2009 9:43:44 AM , Rating: 2
Many people saw the reviews first and not the movie. But Pacemakers came to mind when reading this.


RE: Hollywood shows up in science again
By proneax on 9/3/2009 9:46:10 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, those with pacemakers and metal implants not welcome.


RE: Hollywood shows up in science again
By axeman1957 on 9/3/2009 10:00:32 AM , Rating: 2
Metal implants are not effected by magnetic fields.


RE: Hollywood shows up in science again
By jrollins on 9/3/2009 10:14:58 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Metal implants are not effected by magnetic fields.


I thought that MRI's affected metal implants? So wouldnt that mean that a magnetic field would?


RE: Hollywood shows up in science again
By tastyratz on 9/3/2009 11:10:32 AM , Rating: 5
Dr house taught me that prison tats with metallic ink can be impacted by a strong enough magnetic field too.

But in all reality - metal implants ARE impacted by magnetic fields if they are... MAGNETIC. Titanium is paramagnetic - so a strong enough field could create a problem.
What about simple common household items?
If every time I charge my phone, my toaster goes through a wall... it wouldn't be very practical, would it? Even if you just had your keys poke you every time you walked by... our world revolves around metals.

A field strong enough to transmit any real amounts of power over any kind of distance would concern me.


By 91TTZ on 9/3/2009 5:15:05 PM , Rating: 2
They don't just affect magnetic objects. As long as they're conductive they can generate some amount of electricity when exposed to a strong magnetic field.


By Sooticus on 9/3/2009 10:05:01 PM , Rating: 3
I think I'd just hate the fact that every time I put my wallet down on the kitchen bench the nearby charging pad would degauss my bank card.


By EasyC on 9/3/2009 12:47:44 PM , Rating: 2
Tell that to Wolverine.


By gstrickler on 9/4/2009 1:40:09 AM , Rating: 2
But what about silicone implants? Are they affected by magnetic fields?


By plowak on 9/3/2009 3:49:55 PM , Rating: 3
Not a problem, with Obama's health care plan pacemakers will be replaced with end-of-life counseling.


By Captin Crunch on 9/3/2009 1:47:44 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
"core"

Worst movie ever.


RE: Hollywood shows up in science again
By JediJeb on 9/3/2009 1:58:46 PM , Rating: 2
If a magnetic field as strong as Earth's doesn't cause health problems ( we are afterall walking around in that field constantly all our lives ) would it be likely that only doubling it would cause problems? Does the statement of twice as strong as the Earth's magnetic field mean strength of the local field or strength of the total field compressed into a small area? Those are the questions that need to be answered before people freak out about what it might do to them.


By geddarkstorm on 9/3/2009 2:56:43 PM , Rating: 2
Animals, especially migratory birds, might well be effected though, since they use the Earth's field for navigation. Another, equally as intense field would totally screw them over for a generation or two, or permanently if we didn't produce a stably oriented field. Another problem would be compasses. How can you find magnetic north then?

As for our health itself, it's unlikely to have a direct impact.


By monomer on 9/3/2009 1:59:02 PM , Rating: 2
You're right, "The Core" definitely wasn't a good idea.


RE: Hollywood shows up in science again
By radializer on 9/3/2009 5:33:22 PM , Rating: 2
In terms of raw field strength, the Earth's magnetic field is relatively weak and has a field strength of only 30 ~ 60uT (microTeslas; where Tesla is the SI unit of magnetic field ).

In comparison, the neodymium magnets in your hard drives have field strengths in the 1 ~ 2T range - so they produce a local field that is ~ 33000 times stronger.

I remember working on measurements with superconducting magnets that could get into the 8 ~ 12T ... as obvious, people with pacemakers were not allowed in the vicinity of the lab. Even with good shielding, you could see the effects on any CRT monitor within 25 feet. The screen content would color shift and rotate!

Back to the topic --> Since most of the local EM radiation measurements at people's homes today are in the nT (or nanoTesla) range - the questions of long term exposure effects of even a 30 ~ 60uT field are still valid ones.


By HollyDOL on 9/4/2009 2:20:58 AM , Rating: 4
I'd try to provide less scientific, but more understandable comparison (hopefully)...

Your favourite receiver is built to run with 230V Voltage. Now, what happens if you start feeding it with 300V? It won't work well, does it?

It's same with us and natural EM field. We are built to run in that... any fluctuation from this is going to hurt.

Or... another one... pressure...
human is fine with 101325Pa atmospheric pressure. Notice even small fluctuations cause some people to have health issues (we are talking about <10kPa differences).


Has 'free' power come at last for some?
By cornelius785 on 9/3/2009 9:55:09 AM , Rating: 3
By 'free', I mean 'free to me cause I set up a receiver to steal power from my neighbor'.

Have they addressed this a scenario like this? It probably wouldn't work when the transmitter and receiver are located in different buildings, but probably would work for an apartment building. For various reasons, I'm staying away from this wireless electricity thing.




RE: Has 'free' power come at last for some?
By chrnochime on 9/3/2009 9:59:30 AM , Rating: 1
You won't be able to stay away from this once your neighbor decides to have a set rigged up and you walk through the magnetic fields that form between the two huge-ass magnets.

And people wonder why we get all these weird diseases that didn't exist even 100 year back...


RE: Has 'free' power come at last for some?
By acase on 9/3/09, Rating: 0
By Tsuwamono on 9/3/2009 11:58:16 AM , Rating: 2
Evolution of earth? explain that for me please.


RE: Has 'free' power come at last for some?
By FITCamaro on 9/3/2009 12:12:37 PM , Rating: 2
Evolution is a process that takes tens of thousands of years.

New diseases come from mutations of other diseases. I guess you could call this evolution of diseases, but I don't think science typically does. I could be wrong though.


RE: Has 'free' power come at last for some?
By drmo on 9/3/2009 12:57:36 PM , Rating: 2
"Evolution is a process that takes tens of thousands of years."

That's not true. Evolution can refer to processes that take thousands of years, but I think you are thinking of speciation. Evolution (mutation) happens on a much smaller scale, in a much shorter period of time in the HIV genome within an individual person, producing new strains of the virus that can evade the host immune system (natural selection). Evolution occurs in bacteria in a relatively short period of time when we select for antibiotic resistant bacteria, or new enzymes develop that can metabolize previously unknown compounds.

For bacteria, a generation (cell division) may be 30 minutes, so over 500,000 generations could occur in 30 years. That would be over 5 million years in human evolution (assuming at least 10 years per generation).


RE: Has 'free' power come at last for some?
By foolsgambit11 on 9/4/2009 2:29:11 AM , Rating: 2
Exactly. People frequently conflate speciation and and evolution. So much so that the term 'micro-evolution' has sprung up to refer to the kinds of small scale mutations and that allow a portion of a species' population to have new traits (among other uses of the term).

Have scientists done any artificial speciation experiments? I mean, homo sapiens are only about 200,000 years old, so in a matter of years you could theoretically produce speciation in bacteria, and maybe even in insects. Of course, with the definition of species being so loose, there would always be room for debate unless two populations of once identical lifeforms (which reproduce sexually) could no longer produce viable offspring.


By osalcido on 9/7/2009 4:30:40 AM , Rating: 2
Species refers to higher lifeforms than bacteria. The term you're looking for is "strain", and yes, scientists are always engineering new strains of bacteria.

Now, on the other hand, new species of plants can be produced with just a few cross-breedings within a couple of generations.


By geddarkstorm on 9/3/2009 2:58:56 PM , Rating: 3
And better reporting, classification, and more permeated health care everywhere verses 100 years ago. That's really the reason more than anything. Rates only seem to go up if you're simply noticing what was once overlooked.


RE: Has 'free' power come at last for some?
By drmo on 9/3/2009 12:18:26 PM , Rating: 2
"And people wonder why we get all these weird diseases that didn't exist even 100 year back... "

I'm not sure what you are refering to... The only infectious disease I can think of that didn't exist 100 years ago is AIDS (in humans). Some toxicities, such as radiation posioning became much more common, and obviously chemical toxicities from new chemicals couln't have existed before the chemicals were invented.


RE: Has 'free' power come at last for some?
By radializer on 9/3/2009 5:36:21 PM , Rating: 2
And how do we even know that AIDS didn't exist 100 years ago? Maybe people were dying of it but they just didn't know it...


By drmo on 9/3/2009 6:31:39 PM , Rating: 2
Genetic evidence based on mutation rates from the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus from which HIV has been shown to be derived. It is possible that HIV is older, but genetic tests suggest otherwise.


RE: Has 'free' power come at last for some?
By Fritzr on 9/4/2009 5:58:29 AM , Rating: 3
Actually it is now believed to have been around for about 100 years. Apparently researchers have used the "DNA clock" to date the earliest form of HIV to about 1908. It is a mutation of an SIV strain that has been dated to about 1492. Hard to say exactly how accurate those numbers are, but the estimated dates are based on the observed rate of change in the genome. On such recent dates they are likely to be fairly close to the actual date that the new form was first seen.

It wasn't identified by science and named until 1982, but things can actually exist without being known to scientists :)


By drmo on 9/4/2009 9:32:35 AM , Rating: 3
Yes, I think that is what I said. It is possible that the SIV strain was circulating in people earlier, but as far as we know, there was no HIV/SIV-associated AIDS then. It is quite possible that the virus didn't become pathogenic until much later as well (we don't know).

For the dates reference:

http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F1...


By djcameron on 9/3/2009 12:31:01 PM , Rating: 3
They probably existed, but the doctors hadn't classified them.


By Graviton on 9/3/2009 8:14:19 PM , Rating: 3
Hey your neighbor deserves it if they left their wireless power security turned off. =P


Low tech home appliances have been waiting for this
By Zedtom on 9/3/2009 9:41:48 AM , Rating: 3
I have a friend who works for a large floor care appliance company. Their engineers have been working for years on a feasible alternative to cords for vacuum cleaners. I'm not talking about the roombas and other playthings, but ordinary carpet sweepers that are used everyday.

The limitations and inconvenience of corded appliances make this an idea whose time has come.




By imaheadcase on 9/3/2009 9:57:56 AM , Rating: 2
It marvels me every time i use my electric toothbrush how it charges just sitting it down. You don't even have to use the stand, just lay it next to it.


By inperfectdarkness on 9/3/2009 10:06:01 AM , Rating: 4
i would hope that 100 years of invention would have assisted tesla's ideas. then again...i'm not sure how efficient it would be to have everyone running around looking like they got their genitals stuck on a van de graaff generator.

but it would be funny.


By darkhawk1980 on 9/3/2009 10:49:40 AM , Rating: 3
100 years of invention would have assisted Tesla's ideas...If our government would not have confiscated a large portion of his research upon his death. At the time they were afraid the Nazi's would use it against the U.S. Either way, my understanding is that a large portion of his more interesting research is locked away for atleast another 25 years...I would have loved to have seen Tesla back when he was still alive. Brilliant man, that would most likely not be amazed with the world today.


By threepac3 on 9/3/2009 1:14:51 PM , Rating: 2
I guess its also where they keep the Ark of the Covenant, ah.


By 91TTZ on 9/3/2009 5:18:46 PM , Rating: 2
Ugh. Stop believing in cheap conspiracy theories.

People who buy into all this mystical crap are people without a solid understanding of physics. What Tesla did was firmly grounded in physics, there's nothing magical going on. His papers are not top secret and all that information is now known.


By rcc on 9/4/2009 12:37:11 PM , Rating: 2
It's obviously in Warehouse 13.


Uhhh.....
By AlsoPenCover on 9/3/2009 12:25:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Similar to sound waves, the transmission creates a magnetic field, that devices can convert locally to electricity.


Maybe I mistook what was being said here, but last time I checked, sound waves don't generate magnetic fields. Minor point.




RE: Uhhh.....
By kroker on 9/4/2009 10:19:49 AM , Rating: 2
I think what he meant was that the magnetic field is similar to a sound wave, not that the sound wave can be converted to energy.


RE: Uhhh.....
By MadMan007 on 9/4/2009 1:08:51 PM , Rating: 2
I think you're right on the interpretation but one could convert sound waves to energy. A dynamic speaker in reverse would do this it would just be terribly inefficient.


RE: Uhhh.....
By AlsoPenCover on 9/4/2009 5:40:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think you're right on the interpretation but one could convert sound waves to energy.


Microphones convert sound to electrical signals. Sonar would not work if sound could not be converted into other forms of energy.


RE: Uhhh.....
By kroker on 9/5/2009 2:20:53 AM , Rating: 2
I don't know how a microphone works, but I thought a microphone somehow modulates an electric signal according to the sound, meaning that sound doesn't produce electricity, electricity is already flowing through the microphone.


RE: Uhhh.....
By Alareth on 9/5/2009 6:19:24 PM , Rating: 2
Actually turning sound into electrity and back has been used in communications for years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound-powered_telepho...

The Navy uses these extensively on ships. The system is damn near bulletproof. There are times where I'd end up with a defective mic on the headset so I'd just talk through one of the earpieces.


Tesla
By omgwtf8888 on 9/3/2009 2:42:15 PM , Rating: 2
Too bad the Defense Department grabbed all of Tesla's work and it has set us back this far. The ideal use of his power transmission would be to generate solar/wind/geothermal power in very remote areas/deserts, middle of the ocean, etc and transmit it back to urban areas. Of course the fear of such power transmission becoming a deathray is what got this work locked up originally. Google Tesla and deathray and all kinds of information comes up. Amazing guy WAY ahead of his time...




RE: Tesla
By 91TTZ on 9/3/2009 5:26:11 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Too bad the Defense Department grabbed all of Tesla's work and it has set us back this far. The ideal use of his power transmission would be to generate solar/wind/geothermal power in very remote areas/deserts, middle of the ocean, etc and transmit it back to urban areas. Of course the fear of such power transmission becoming a deathray is what got this work locked up originally. Google Tesla and deathray and all kinds of information comes up. Amazing guy WAY ahead of his time...


Tesla was ahead of his time in his solid understanding of the physics involved. He did nothing magical, nothing mystical or "alternative". It's just pure science.

Sadly, Tesla's biggest supporters are young anti-establishment punks who have limited understanding of physics and buy into lame conspiracy theories and alternative energy bullshit. You sound like one of them. This is basic physics, there is no great breakthrough.

Learn some more about science and you'll be less amazed at the guy and more appreciative in a realistic manner.


RE: Tesla
By Fritzr on 9/4/2009 5:44:19 AM , Rating: 2
Yep, broadcast power is alive and well. Every radio (including TV) transmitter is broadcasting power that is tapped by attaching leads to an antenna. The power that is supplied locally powers amps and other accessories. The pure radio receiver & low power speaker can be driven entirely by the broadcaster. I used a crystal radio kit with a 100' ground loop antenna that was just wire unwound from a small transformer to receive Armed Forces Radio Germany ... I was in Suffolk England listening to German, French and English radio stations using a broadcast powered radio.

The drawback to broadcast power is that any power not used by a receiver is wasted.

Short range broadcast systems have the same drawback. Any power not received is part of the inefficiency.

The system they are talking about here is inductance. The "transmitter" is the primary coil of a transformer and the "receiver" is the secondary coil of a transformer. Very basic electrical design. The mystifying part for onlookers us that the two coils are not located in the same case.

If I recall correctly you can build a "wireless" fluorescent lamp fixture using inductance. The light fluoresces due to the presence of the magnetic field. This was a popular demo in Tesla's day and is still occasionally used for science demos.

Yep took a minute to do a Google search and got this Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrodeless_lamp
No conspiracy to bury it other than the usual marketing of whatever will earn money for the corporation. If the Wiki can be believed the induction powered lamps are available today for specialized needs.


RE: Tesla
By Alareth on 9/5/2009 6:27:19 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
If I recall correctly you can build a "wireless" fluorescent lamp fixture using inductance. The light fluoresces due to the presence of the magnetic field. This was a popular demo in Tesla's day and is still occasionally used for science demos.


You can use a fluorescent bulb to check for "leaks" on a household microwave oven. Just run it around the outside while the oven is on.


RE: Tesla
By Bill0151 on 9/4/2009 11:21:38 AM , Rating: 2
I've got a pair of tesla's...I didn't know I could use them to make electricity!


RE: Tesla
By FaceMaster on 9/6/2009 11:48:24 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I've got a pair of tesla's...I didn't know I could use them to make electricity!


I use my pair of teslas for a different purpose, and I can assure you that your Mum doesn't want wireless any time soon.


Tesla's idea
By Regected on 9/3/2009 10:17:20 AM , Rating: 2
It's been almost 100 years since the mainstream power conglomerates shut down Tesla's wireless power transmition research. They did not like the idea of changing the way customers were charged for electricity. Wireless power means a community would have to be billed as a whole rather than being able to bill each point of use. Had they not shut him down, we might all be driving electric cars today, without the need for bulky batteries. Just another example of big business keeping society from progressing.

While this announcement is far from earth moving, it is moving in a right direction. They don't want to power large areas with their technology, but eliminate the need for cords and batteries around the house. Imagine not having to recharge a remote controlled car while playing with it, or never having to plug in your laptop. Batteries for remotes would be a thing of the past.

I wonder exactly what new technology these guys have come up with. Sympathetic resonance and fractal antennas have been well established. Strong magnetic coupling would interfere with normal integrated circuit operation. This has been show with the high failure rate of Wii wands using the connectionless recharging systems.




RE: Tesla's idea
By acase on 9/3/2009 10:49:11 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
This has been show with the high failure rate of Wii wands using the connectionless recharging systems.


Crap, those don't work? We just registered for one of those for a wedding present.


RE: Tesla's idea
By Regected on 9/3/2009 2:51:07 PM , Rating: 2
They work, but the electromagnetic field used to recharge the batteries can cause premature failure in the wand's integrated circuits. Proper shielding would solve this problem, but the Wii wand was not designed for such use. You'll have charged batteries, but will eventually fry the wand.

On a side note, most of the connectionless rechargers require you to remove the motion plus attachment from the wand prior to charging. Since the motion plus is attached to the jacket, you are already stripped down and ready to use a normal charger.


RE: Tesla's idea
By 91TTZ on 9/3/2009 5:20:49 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
It's been almost 100 years since the mainstream power conglomerates shut down Tesla's wireless power transmition research. They did not like the idea of changing the way customers were charged for electricity. Wireless power means a community would have to be billed as a whole rather than being able to bill each point of use. Had they not shut him down, we might all be driving electric cars today, without the need for bulky batteries. Just another example of big business keeping society from progressing


Ugh. PLEASE stop believing this crap. Why don't you learn something instead of subscribing to idiotic conspiracy theories.


RE: Tesla's idea
By InfantryRocks on 9/3/2009 7:23:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just another example of big business keeping society from progressing.


Yep, businesses have never developed anything useful, they just keep holding us back!

Fight the power! Redistribute it all! Free Mumia!


Inefficient
By Dwezil on 9/3/2009 9:42:04 AM , Rating: 3
And exactly how much power is lost in this tranmission? Are they advocating having a transmitter left turned on to charge your electronic gear or electric car all the time - since plugging it in is too much work, I'm sure that turning on and off a switch would be too much work also.




RE: Inefficient
By jrollins on 9/3/2009 9:47:44 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
And exactly how much power is lost in this tranmission?

At first the loss will probably be great, as it is right now power is lost in transmission over power lines.


Sterility/Cancerous?
By riottime on 9/3/2009 10:18:58 AM , Rating: 2
i hope it doesn't cause sterility and/or cancer if you get caught between the transmitting fields.




RE: Sterility/Cancerous?
By FITCamaro on 9/3/2009 12:56:15 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah but what if you got the other end of the spectrum and your baby was born with superpowers. You could father Magneto and take over the world.


Efficiency
By RU482 on 9/3/2009 11:48:25 AM , Rating: 2
Even if the transmission is high efficiency, there is still loss. While I love the idea of no power cords, I don't see how this will fly on a grand scale in these times of pushing for higher energy efficiency.

Example, if this is even 90% efficient, it now takes 110 watts to power something that requires 100 watts.




RE: Efficiency
By kaoken on 9/3/2009 3:46:04 PM , Rating: 2
Holy crap if it was 90% efficient this would be incredible. Currently transmission lines are around 65-90% efficient.

http://sites.energetics.com/gridworks/grid.html


ONE WORD
By ted28601 on 9/3/2009 2:56:28 PM , Rating: 2
CANCER




RE: ONE WORD
By Alareth on 9/5/2009 6:45:38 PM , Rating: 2
GEMINI

Word association games are fun.


Please Make it Quick
By Clippingimages on 9/8/2009 1:09:56 AM , Rating: 2
Woow ... It would be a revolution for third world countries where electricity faces regular scarcity.




RE: Please Make it Quick
By 91TTZ on 9/8/2009 2:39:16 PM , Rating: 2
You sound naive.

This is definitely not a "revolution", considering that the technology has been around for over 100 years and hasn't caught on for obvious reasons (low efficiency, easy to steal power)


By callmeroy on 9/3/2009 12:31:17 PM , Rating: 1
Kinda neat in theory...but I'm partial to my normal human form of JUST one head , 2 arms, 2 legs, etc.

Until they can test the ever loving crap out of this kind of technology by actual doctors -- in studies NOT funded by the company who would gain by selling this technology...then yeah.....

I think I'll stick to good ol' cable management to make things look tidy....




By heulenwolf on 9/3/2009 2:22:17 PM , Rating: 2
Nobody's saying how it actually works yet, so I can't say for sure, but keep in mind that speakers use electromagnetic induction, too. They try to damp out reasonance, so in that they differ. Speakers cranking out hundreds of watts is not uncommon in home or car stereo systems. I wouldn't call in the medical community just yet.


In further news...
By bubbastrangelove on 9/3/2009 9:57:23 AM , Rating: 2
Apparently this will be the power source for the space elevator.




No way
By Gunbuster on 9/3/09, Rating: 0
RE: No way
By Curelom on 9/3/2009 1:03:15 PM , Rating: 2
Your tin foil hat will spark like it would in a microwave oven.


By chromal on 9/3/2009 10:42:36 AM , Rating: 2
Given its inefficiency and the need to cut energy-production CO2 emissions, I don't think it does anyone a favor to talk about replacing relatively efficient wired power supplies with wasteful home or business wireless power transmission systems.




waste?
By Alphafox78 on 9/3/2009 10:54:28 AM , Rating: 2
how much waste power does this use vs just plugging it in? it must have a cost to transmit it without wires. I mean its neet but if it takes an extra 4 hours to charge something and use 30% more power to transmit it IDK how usefull it is.




EMI?
By Ryun on 9/3/2009 11:19:36 AM , Rating: 2
I'm going to pretext this comment by saying I have a very limited knowledge of the topic. That being said: don't most countries already have a limit on the amount of electro-magnetic interference a component could produce? Wouldn't machines already plugged in be effected negatively by this?




Nikola
By zkln on 9/3/2009 6:25:00 PM , Rating: 2
It's Nikola Tesla, not Nikolai...




Earthe magnetic field
By Spind on 9/4/2009 12:09:27 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
A full deployment is estimated to possibly create a magnetic field as strong as the Earth's own magnetic field.


Can it work in reverse direction? In the sense, earths magnetic field is already around, why cant we utilize it and draw power from that? Like a borewell ... we can just draw power seamlessly while roaming also :)




By MarioJP on 9/4/2009 1:55:02 AM , Rating: 2
This is a awsome idea but its by no means without serious hurdles. this is why it has never progressed. I can explain since I dealt with magnetism and electricity alot.

1.Very poor efficiency if its air core (no iron core like a power transformer has), not to mention heat that will be generated which will results in loss of power efficiency. Take an example of power supplies and power transformers. If it overloads it will get very hot and melt. My electric induction toothbrush gets warm almost hot when it is charging and it takes quite awhile to charge.

2.Power regulation would have to be keyed to each unique device. I am guessing this could be fixed by the device's electronics regulation, and to what extent should the magnetic field's strength would be by default so the regulator can work properly??.

3. any metal object would act as a core which will degrade the field's efficiency even more because in order for the field to charge the devices, the field has to be fluctuating at a frequency which is measured in hertz, which is why we can't use the earth's magnetic field that one guy asked in this post.

This fluctuating or pulse field can cause metal objects to induce electric current in them if the frequency is too high and the field is too strong, which it would have to be to make up for the poor efficiency.

and lastly people will steal lol. Just by the inductor itself will draw alot of current so to reduce the amperage you have to really go high hertz.

Not to mention any nearby electronics that has a mini transformer in them would cause a negative side effect that can probably damage the device by inducing strong currents that was not designed for that device.

And for pacemakers this is really bad lol. High hertz equals fatal cardiac arrest. Any small electronics exposed to high resonance would not be good. So yeah there is work to be done for this to happen in a large scale.

Now what I can see happening is those magnetic pads which still would require a cord to connect to the outlet lol. At least you have a witricity in that small area though. but you still not eliminating cord factor though LOL.




By gstrickler on 9/4/2009 10:42:36 AM , Rating: 2
Rumors of my demise are greatly exaggerated. - Your power cord.




Wireless Shmireless
By rburnham on 9/4/2009 10:48:05 AM , Rating: 2
I don't even like wireless networking! Now get off my lawn!




By kroker on 9/4/2009 11:35:26 AM , Rating: 2
I don't think this will be such a big thing. How often do you unplug your TV? How often do you unplug your desktop PC? With a bit of careful wire management, cords should not be such a big problem. The devices where cords are most inconvenient are already available in wireless form - we already have wireless keyboards, mice, headphones etc, it's just that they need batteries which occasionally need to be replaced/recharged - and I don't find that to be such a terrible inconvenience either.

This is a technology that offers some advantages (ease of use and flexibility) in exchange for some disadvantages (limited range, limited efficiency, possible health risks). It's a trade-off, not a revolution. And I don't think the problem it fixes is quite problematic enough to outweigh the disadvantages. I don't think it will have widespread use. It would indeed be useful for rechargeable devices (phones, laptops, electric cars), it may be used for those (I envision it as placing phones or laptops near a device which generates these magnetic fields instead of connecting them with cables), but otherwise I don't think it's worth it.

If it would somehow be possible to harness electricity from Earth's magnetic fields themselves (effectively eliminating all three disadvantages mentioned above, in addition to being free), now THAT would be a REALLY big thing.




not ready
By cactusdog on 9/5/2009 3:20:06 PM , Rating: 2
Ya i tested a wireless charger but all it did was magnetize my ass.




Really no cables?
By Oregonian2 on 9/5/2009 7:33:43 PM , Rating: 2
Most if not all of devices I think being talked about are all "wireless" right now to begin with, and they're only talking about adding wireless recharging links, rather than having one's cell phone having no battery but still working fine no matter where one is located.

Other issue is that most all of those sorts of devices still use USB cables for various purposes. So it seems less of an advantage with one having a cable "still".




Encryption
By Kyanzes on 9/6/2009 7:49:49 AM , Rating: 2
So how do you encrypt power transmission then? I mean unless protected, people will steal it. Also, when a transmission passes my backyard, am I entitled to tap in?

(Bulb brightens) "Hey! Got a signal!"
(Scolding voice) "Jesus, pull the curtain, the neighbour will see!"

"2048 bit encrypted power! Subscribe and dial in today!"




"I f***ing cannot play Halo 2 multiplayer. I cannot do it." -- Bungie Technical Lead Chris Butcher














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