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Print 28 comment(s) - last by noirsoft.. on Nov 17 at 2:38 AM


  (Source: blog.walshie.me)
"Tonight's the night all systems fail."

According to the blog istartedsomething, an Australian developer has been able to gain root access to Windows Phone 7 and a full-on jailbreak is in the works.

It all started when a user on xda-developers.com noticed that the Network Profile app by Samsung used native code, and not Silverlight-based code like all other WP7 apps. He noted that a DLL called "Microsoft.Phone.InteropServices" -- with the right manipulation -- could provide COM access.

In steps Australian developer Chris Walsh with the next breakthrough. Walsh takes the information from xda, and is able to load a valid WP7 app using a developer sideloading process on a device that has the ability to run unmanaged code.

The breakthrough, while essentially providing root access, stops short of a neat, bundled jailbreak. Sideloading an application on a common, non-developer device is the next step, but could prove challenged because an app of that nature would have a lot of trouble making through Microsoft's market certification.

Still, the possibilities of a jailbroken WP7 device are tantalizing. It is no longer a matter of "if", but "when" will it happen.


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Man...
By Shatbot on 11/15/2010 8:12:23 AM , Rating: 2
The jail breakers are on a roll. The PS3 update that pushed back the Gran Turismo 5 release date was also just broken.

You can even use a cell phone to jail break the PS3, and from the sounds of this there could well be a WinMo port in the future (they already have symbian, iOS and and android beta.

Hilarious.




RE: Man...
By B3an on 11/15/2010 8:28:33 AM , Rating: 3
It's NOT called jailbreaking. And the author should know this... he only works for a tech site...

Jailbreaking is only for iToys. For Android it's called Rooting, for WP7... well i dont even think it's got a name yet?

Lets just call it all hacking or cracking and be done with it.


RE: Man...
By joedon3 on 11/15/2010 8:59:11 AM , Rating: 2
Agreed! It's called rooting in Android because Android is a form of linux, and the "root" user is the "GOD" user of a Linux system.

iPhone is also Linux based, but jailbreaking on the iPhone comes from breaking the ties to the carrier and making mild configuration changes and it stuck. Not much else you can do with iOS with "root" access since there is no source code.

I highly doubt that WM7 is Linux based, so "root" is inaccurate. Even the "administrator" account has limitations on a windows system where root does not on Linux.


RE: Man...
By Flunk on 11/15/2010 9:10:49 AM , Rating: 2
Windows Phone 7 uses the WinCE kernel.


RE: Man...
By Flunk on 11/15/2010 9:14:01 AM , Rating: 2
Also, iOS is not Linux based. It's based on OS X->OpenStep->NextStep->BSD.


RE: Man...
By joedon3 on 11/15/2010 9:20:04 AM , Rating: 2
I stand corrected. :-)


RE: Man...
By The Raven on 11/15/2010 9:49:40 AM , Rating: 4
You probably were thinking UNIX and not Linux, and in that case you would be correct as all of those aforementioned OSs are UNIX based.


RE: Man...
By RealTheXev on 11/16/2010 2:52:10 PM , Rating: 2
We called it Jailbreaking for WM 6.5, why would we call it anything different for WP 7?


RE: Man...
By noirsoft on 11/17/2010 2:38:51 AM , Rating: 2
Who is "we"? I've been reading XDA-Developers for a while, and haven't seen the term "jailbreaking" in any of the forums there I've browsed or in the ROMs I've downloaded.


RE: Man...
By omnicronx on 11/15/2010 1:59:24 PM , Rating: 2
In terms of what is being discussed here, we are talking Potato, Pot'a'to..

And if you want to get technical, BSD is a in many ways a derivative of unix.. (and was known as Berkley Unix for a long time)

Thus OSX -> OpenStep -> Nextstep -> BSD -> Unix ;)


RE: Man...
By The Raven on 11/15/2010 10:12:50 AM , Rating: 4
Is that really true? I swear I knew the term 'jailbreak' to mean a more generalized unlocking of a device far before it applied to iCrap. Why does/should it only apply to iCrap? I mean neither 'jail' nor 'break' have anything to do with crApple, so why should the term be applied only to them?

It seems that hacking is too general (meaning that jailbreaking is a subset of hacking) and cracking (the way it seem you are using it) has more to do with breaking codes (not "code") like reg codes. I think it comes from the term safe cracking. However, a CD crack would not fall under this viewpoint lol wtf!!? Can all the hackers get together and write a dictionary with extensive etymologies for the rest of us? ;-)

But yeah, we could just call it hacking and be done with it.

So the headline could be corrected to the following...
quote:
Windows Phone 7 Hacked

And the first paragraph...
quote:
According to the blog istartedsomething, an Australian developer has been able to hack Windows Phone 7 and a full-on hack is in the works.


<throws hands in air> Just tell me how to get my phone doodads to work how I want them to!!!


RE: Man...
By omnicronx on 11/15/2010 12:59:12 PM , Rating: 2
No, the term jailbreak was generalized with the advent of rooting iOS devices, and historically has only applied to unix based OS's for privilege escalation/gaining root access.. (and it was actually the name for the process or tool used, i.e the implementation, not really the act itself)

Not that it matters though, everyone is just going to call it jailbreaking anyways.. (though technically the poster above is correct)

Lets just be politically correct and call it 'privalege escalation', as that term is pretty much universal ;)


RE: Man...
By omnicronx on 11/15/2010 1:00:42 PM , Rating: 2
Well.. if he were only talking about Windows..

He's dead wrong about android considerings it unix underpinnings..

Its just not cool enough in the Android community to call it 'jailbreaking' as that associates them with Apple ;)


RE: Man...
By The Raven on 11/15/2010 2:32:22 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
No, the term jailbreak was generalized with the advent of rooting iOS devices, and historically has only applied to unix based OS's for privilege escalation/gaining root access.. (and it was actually the name for the process or tool used, i.e the implementation, not really the act itself)

Thanks bro. Do you have a source for that? I did a quick search and found nothing but "How to jailbreak the iPhone" came up lol.


RE: Man...
By omnicronx on 11/15/2010 3:00:15 PM , Rating: 2
I don't have a source off hand but I'm sure its searchable.

Its coined from the term 'chroot jail'. So its easy to see where the term jailbreaking came from ;)


RE: Man...
By The Raven on 11/16/2010 12:16:49 PM , Rating: 2
Thanks, but like I said, I did a quick search and didn't find much more than "how to JB an iPhone."

So I guess this means that you can jailbreak an Android-based phone or a TiVo as well since Linux is a UNIX based OS.

Now that that is all straightened out I feel dumber somehow :-(


RE: Man...
By The Raven on 11/16/2010 12:46:25 PM , Rating: 2
Search for 'FreeBSD' in these comments and you'll see that the etymology goes back to FreeBSD. So it is not a UNIX thing after all. But the meaning of the term "jailbreak" as it is used in the vernacular may have more of a general usage.

I kind of like it because it make it sound bad to be tied to a certain entity. I mean, we value freedom in the US, right?


RE: Man...
By FATCamaro on 11/15/2010 6:16:14 PM , Rating: 2
You're wrong as usual. It is jailbreaking because of BSD jails. Go read up on it, someone posted a links at the bottom of this thread.


RE: Man...
By The Raven on 11/16/2010 12:42:05 PM , Rating: 2
Thank you for pointing that out. But just to be clear it is FreeBSD and therefore OSX 10.0 and up that jailbreaking would apply to. (<can of worms> I know that iOS is OSX based but is it based on OSX 10.0+? I'm guessing so.)

And therefore I conceed that the etymology goes back to FreeBSD, but we could probably agree that the vernacular gives the term jailbreak a different more generalized definition. So I guess we can give the author a 'jail'break here, no?

Just like podcasts are names as such because they were popularized during the era of the iPods. But it is still a podcast if I listen to it on my Samsung phone.


RE: Man...
By mrbios on 11/15/2010 12:31:48 PM , Rating: 2
The term "jailbreak" is derived from Unix, which last I check pre-dated iPhones by a few decades.


RE: Man...
By ekv on 11/15/2010 1:35:31 PM , Rating: 2
Hey! Come on, now. The Steve derived Unix.


Root access?
By Spivonious on 11/15/2010 8:25:55 AM , Rating: 3
Being able to use COM servers does not automatically mean root access. Can we get some more details on this?




RE: Root access?
By Flunk on 11/15/2010 9:16:24 AM , Rating: 2
You're right, the only way it would constitute root access is if the Phone doesn't support multiple users, like Windows Mobile, where it just assumes the user has all available rights.


RE: Root access?
By omnicronx on 11/15/2010 1:50:59 PM , Rating: 2
He's updated his page since then and has demonstrated full filesystem access aside from files on the ROM image.

I don't think you can really call this root access though,hes merely figured out a way to work with native DLL's.. and as such can do a lot of what you would be able to do with real root access through other various methods.

i.e for example you can download a file, save it, but then you would have to access the file via COM if you wanted to do anything with it.

This is not like rooting/jailbreak for an iOS device in which you are truly getting root access to the unix filesystem. (in which you can do pretty much anything)


RE: Root access?
By Spivonious on 11/15/2010 3:36:54 PM , Rating: 2
Still, I don't see how that's a security risk. I highly doubt that WP7 gives the phone user full admin access.


RE: Root access?
By omnicronx on 11/15/2010 4:32:21 PM , Rating: 2
Its not security risk, especially when you consider you can only do this if you paid for the development tools.

Its completely useless in its current form for pretty much everyone..


Strange choice of title
By Murst on 11/15/2010 10:32:32 AM , Rating: 2
I'm not sure why the author chose to use "root access", as this would imply that there is some "root" account on WP7 (there may be one, but that's not what this "hack" is about).

Basically, at the moment, the WP7 phone is very locked down in terms of the APIs that developers are allowed to use. Carriers have an expanded API set. This "hack" exposes the carrier API set to regular developers.

Saying that this is the "native" code is also extremely misleading. This is the exact same language that all developers work with, with some additional namespaces.

This is pretty interesting, but I highly doubt that these are all of the methods that MS themselves have to work with. These are just some of the methods that they felt comfortable enough to allow carriers to use, but they were not comfortable enough to allow regular developers to have access to.

Perhaps in a future update, most of these methods will become available to all developers (once these have been tested, etc). I always thought it was strange that carriers would get their own API, while the rest of the developers would get a trimmed down version of that. If anything, the carriers should get the trimmed down version of the API so that they aren't allowed to do too much w/ the phone before the end-user gets a hold of it.




Jail in freeBSD...
By Mugur on 11/15/2010 3:40:21 PM , Rating: 2
http://www.freebsd.org/doc/handbook/jails.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FreeBSD_jail

Since OSX/iOS are BSD derivatives, they use jails, therefore the term "jailbreak" to gain administrative access...




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