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War has torn the sleepy mountain nation of Afghanistan for the past three decades. Now, however, its fortune may change, thanks to the discovery of a mineral deposit wth over $1T USD worth of lithium and other mineral deposits.  (Source: Tyler Hicks/The New York Times)

Lithium is commonly used in batteries (electric vehicles, electronics) and pharmaceuticals.  (Source: About.com)

A map of Afghanistan's resouces, along with their value.  (Source: The New York Times)
Military deployment and close political ties may give U.S. ideal opportunity to harvest valuable resource

Lithium deposits worldwide may be sufficient to eventually sustain the demands of an electric-vehicle driven world and modern electronics, but in the near-term, demand-driven shortages loom.  Fortunately, the U.S. has made a pivotal discovery that may help to keep costs in the U.S. down.

According to a report in 
The New York Times, senior American government officials are quoted as saying that a massive mineral deposit has been discovered in Afghanistan which holds $1T USD in lithium, iron, copper, cobalt, and gold deposits. 

The lithium deposits are expected to exceed those of Bolivia, the world's largest current producer of lithium.  Bolivia contains over 9 million tons of extractable lithium, according to recent estimates.  Lithium prices currently are at around $6,700 USD per ton and have doubled over the last few years.  That places the net value of the lithium deposits alone at around $60B-$100B USD.  An internal Pentagon memo states that Afghanistan may become the "Saudi Arabia of lithium."

The iron deposits are estimated to be worth $420.9B USD and the copper deposits are estimated to be worth $274B USD.  A full breakdown (with the notable absence of lithium) is available here.

The U.S. currently occupies Afghanistan, and this spring U.S. President Barack Obama started the deployment of 30,000 extra troops to the region.  The U.S. troops are safeguarding the fledgling Afghani government from the Taliban, a Sunni Islamist insurgency movement that would prefer to see the country returned to a non-democratic religious rule.

That close relationship may allows the U.S. to harvest the resources quite affordably.  And it should allow U.S. corporations to easily enter the country and pursue development of the resources.

U.S. officials recently briefed Afghanistan's President Hamid Karzai and the Afghan government on the discovery.  Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the United States Central Command, in a Saturday interview stated, "There is stunning potential here.  There are a lot of ifs, of course, but I think potentially it is hugely significant."

The discovery could provide for a great boost to Afghanistan's standard of living.  Currently, the entire nation only makes $12B USD a year, a figure largely derived from Opium drug trafficking and foreign aid.

However, threats to the U.S. and Afghanistan harvesting the deposit remain.  Paul A. Brinkley, deputy undersecretary of defense for business and leader of the Pentagon team, says that while Afghanistan has a national mineral mining law, this law has never received a serious challenge before.  He states, "No one has tested that law; no one knows how it will stand up in a fight between the central government and the provinces."

Also, he's worried about possible environmental impact of the mining, stating, "The big question is, can this be developed in a responsible way, in a way that is environmentally and socially responsible?  No one knows how this will work."

Afghanistan has little current mining capacity.  States Jack Medlin, a geologist in theUnited States Geological Survey’s international affairs program, "This is a country that has no mining culture.  They’ve had some small artisanal mines, but now there could be some very, very large mines that will require more than just a gold pan."

Even if the U.S. can handle environmental and legal concerns, there's the issue of the Taliban trying to take the deposits by force.  And there's the problem of growing tensions between the U.S. government and Karzai, following suggestions by U.S. officials that Karzai may have committed election fraud in his most recent election.

Regardless, the deposits appear valuable enough that it's likely that the U.S. and Afghani governments will be compelled to cooperate to begin their extraction.

Interest in possible mineral deposits was triggered by 1980s era Soviet charts which suggested mineral deposits in Afghanistan's mountainous terrain.  The U.S. Geological Survey investigated the region, first using advanced gravity and magnetic measuring equipment attached to an old Navy Orion P-3 aircraft and then with a using an old British bomber equipped with instruments that offered a three-dimensional profile of mineral deposits below the earth’s surface.

Most of the deposits are located in central and northern Afghanistan.  The main lithium deposit is located in Afghanistan's central Ghazni Province.  Many other deposits look to hold rare earth metals, which are at present largely controlled by China.  There also appears to be large deposits of niobium, a rare, soft, grey, ductile transition metal used in superconductors.



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This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Rewrite...
By mdogs444 on 6/14/2010 11:07:29 AM , Rating: 5
quote:
The New York Times, senior American government officials are quoted as saying that a massive mineral deposit has been discovered in Afghanistan which holds $1T USD in lithium, as well as huge veins of iron, copper, cobalt, gold.


Jason, what you are saying here is not true. Perhaps you read the original article wrong, or are not proofreading. The entire deposit is worth about $1T as a whole, in which lithium just happens to be a part of the entire basket of deposits such as gold, iron, etc. The original article is NOT saying that the deposit of Lithium itself is worth $1T, and then saying there are additional deposits of other things.

In fact, a similar article out there that I read on foxnews.com cited this:
"So far, the biggest mineral deposits discovered are of iron and copper, but finds include large deposits of niobium, a soft metal used in producing superconducting steel, as well as rare earth elements and large gold deposits in Pashtun areas of southern Afghanistan, the report said."




RE: Rewrite...
By mdogs444 on 6/14/2010 11:09:27 AM , Rating: 2
And allow me to apologize in advance if it came off as a bit snippy....but I just found your paragraph to be misleading.


RE: Rewrite...
By Suntan on 6/14/2010 11:48:04 AM , Rating: 5
Don’t apologize. His whole article is made to sensationalize the story in his personal quest to make everyone think that lithium is some kind of scarce material. The main article that he copied all his info from (the one in the NY Times) clearly states that the majority of the wealth of the find is in copper and iron.

In addition, he is completely throwing out his own, unsubstantiated opinion about “US companies” getting a leg up on the rights for mining. The real article clearly points out how other countries are working to influence control over this, with the Chinese already buying Afghani ministers to get the rights for various mining years ago.

Further, the Afghanis knew about these deposits decades ago when the Soviets originally found them. They’ve just been too busy killing each other to do anything with them for the last 30 years.

I’d suggest anyone interested in the topic just go read the article at the NY Times website. It is the source for which all the quotes and info was derived here (but without the false, sensationalist assumptions that try and make this dailytech article into something it is not.)

-Suntan


RE: Rewrite...
By kattanna on 6/14/2010 11:52:34 AM , Rating: 5
quote:
Don’t apologize. His whole article is made to sensationalize the story


point me to a story of his where that is not the case


RE: Rewrite...
By AssBall on 6/14/2010 12:14:40 PM , Rating: 3
Mick skewed an article again? Say it ain't so. Color me unsurprised.


RE: Rewrite...
By JasonMick (blog) on 6/14/2010 12:20:49 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Further, the Afghanis knew about these deposits decades ago when the Soviets originally found them. They’ve just been too busy killing each other to do anything with them for the last 30 years.


That statement is misleading. The exact extent or location of the deposits was NOT known. Did you read the article? Soviet maps suggested there might be deposits, and general locations of these deposits, but it was not until the USGS aerial analysis that the exact amount was known.

quote:
In addition, he is completely throwing out his own, unsubstantiated opinion about “US companies” getting a leg up on the rights for mining.


Why would we not get a leg up? We're occupying the country, and the Pentagon has explicitly stated that it is working to coordinate the extraction of these resources. I never said that other nations (China, the EU) will also fight to gain these resources, I merely pointed out that we enjoy a slight edge over them currently, which I feel to be entirely accurate.

And let's be thankful for that. I'd rather we have these deposits than China.

quote:
his personal quest to make everyone think that lithium is some kind of scarce material


Again, I'd urge you not to make blanket statements without checking their accuracy. You are absolutely wrong here. Read this:
http://www.dailytech.com/Lithium+Deposits+Plentifu...

I never have tried to say that lithium is scarce in occurrence. I have however written that demand for refining and extraction is currently exceeding supply. This is absolutely the case. If you don't want to take my word for it, look at lithium prices, which have been high over the last few years.

That's why this is an important story.

Please don't try to state my opinions if you fail to understand them.


RE: Rewrite...
By dark matter on 6/14/10, Rating: -1
RE: Rewrite...
By theArchMichael on 6/14/2010 3:40:18 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
I never enjoy reading a point by point rebuttal.They are often clouded by half truths and accusations that have no basis on the material facts, or even the original comment. I find them rather petty and it really drags all sides involved down into the gutter.
Now, Jason, I will hold my hands up and not claim innocence here. In the past I used to employ the same tactics, so I am guilty as charged. Then, as I developed, I stopped. I really can't recommend proofreading prior to posting enough.


You're absolutely right, thinly veiled passive-aggressive diatribes that don't address the issues at hand are the way to go...


RE: Rewrite...
By sleepeeg3 on 6/14/10, Rating: 0
RE: Rewrite...
By YashBudini on 6/14/10, Rating: 0
RE: Rewrite...
By FishTankX on 6/15/2010 9:39:27 AM , Rating: 3


quote:
But we don't make anything. What would we do with it besides sell it back to China?


That is total BS. The US is currently the largest manufacturer in the world. (For now) According to UN stats anyways.

http://unstats.un.org/unsd/snaama/dnllist.asp
(warning, absurdly hard to digest spreadsheet on GDP by share)
What, you think the Chinese fly all airbus?


RE: Rewrite...
By Masospaghetti on 6/16/2010 8:50:33 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
What, you think the Chinese fly all airbus?


You do know Airbus is a European consortium with no manufacturing in the states, right...??

Boeing and formerly Mcdonnell Douglas are the American aviation companies.


RE: Rewrite...
By JasonMick (blog) on 6/14/2010 12:12:47 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
And allow me to apologize in advance if it came off as a bit snippy....but I just found your paragraph to be misleading


No, I absolutely appreciate the comment. The New York Times article was rather vague on the exact amount that these resources were worth, individually. I made a mistake implying the lithium alone was worth $1T USD, but I assure you that this morning I have been working to fact check exactly what it WAS worth.

I have since done some research and come up with what I feel to be a reasonable estimate of the lithium deposits' worth, given the premise that they exceed Bolivia's deposits, lithium's current price for ton, and the total magnitude of Bolivia's deposits.

I hope this new info provides people with a better estimate than The New York Times's vague numbers. That said, I do appreciate the work the reporters at the Times did to gather up info from the Pentagon and break this story.

And as an aside to the other people responding to the original op, when this kind of info is raised, I would appreciate if you tone down the replies and give me time to fix the material. At the time this issue was raised, I was on the road, and I just now was able to fix it... Often times I'm working to collect more info to supplement the limited info I initially had available...


RE: Rewrite...
By Suntan on 6/14/2010 1:24:51 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
And as an aside to the other people responding to the original op, when this kind of info is raised, I would appreciate if you tone down the replies and give me time to fix the material. At the time this issue was raised, I was on the road, and I just now was able to fix it... Often times I'm working to collect more info to supplement the limited info I initially had available...


Yeah see, in the real world, "reporters" with integrity wait until they actually have all the facts to publish their articles. They don't admonish their readers for pointing out simple mistakes instead of passing it along to the writer in secret.

Get your info straight the first time, then we wouldn't complain. After all, you just copied everything from the NY Times for your initial post. I seemed to have been able to understand it better while reading it on my phone in the crapper than you did, and I wasn't even worried about copying it as an article of my own.

Lastly, one or two articles would just be considered sloppy, but pretty much every one of your postings bends the reality of the story to increase its sensationalist quotent.

-Suntan


RE: Rewrite...
By JasonMick (blog) on 6/14/2010 1:38:38 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Yeah see, in the real world, "reporters" with integrity wait until they actually have all the facts to publish their articles. They don't admonish their readers for pointing out simple mistakes instead of passing it along to the writer in secret.


Again, you are entirely wrong. READ below please. I did not "admonish" the original op, I thanked them. There's no secrecy.

quote:
Get your info straight the first time, then we wouldn't complain. After all, you just copied everything from the NY Times for your initial post. I seemed to have been able to understand it better while reading it on my phone in the crapper than you did, and I wasn't even worried about copying it as an article of my own.


Obviously not, as your first post indicated. You seemed to indicate that the Afghanis knew previously where these resources were or their extent, which is wholly wrong. Also, the NYT piece did NOT put a monetary value on the lithium deposit or even an estimate of how many tons it might be (other than "more than Bolivia"). It did do this for other minerals, but there was definite info missing from that piece.

Fortunately I dug up this info and provided an estimate. You're welcome.

quote:
Lastly, one or two articles would just be considered sloppy, but pretty much every one of your postings bends the reality of the story to increase its sensationalist quotent.


Again, this is a legitimate news story. I don't see you having pointed out any factual errors, other than the one originally voiced by the op, which has been corrected.

What exactly is sensational about it?

Can you voice a single legitimate complaint, or are you going to merely write more long vague accusations?

It seems to me that you are seeking attention, so I suppose I'm making a mistake in humoring your behavior.


RE: Rewrite...
By Drexial on 6/14/2010 11:40:51 AM , Rating: 1
Hmmmm Yeah actually I believe Lithium would fall under the rare earth elements. Which according to the chart only account for $7.4 billion, what amount of that is Lithium is not made clear.

There is also 6.3 billion worth of asbestos....I didn't think that was used for anything anymore.


RE: Rewrite...
By inperfectdarkness on 6/14/2010 1:14:27 PM , Rating: 2
asbestos is still used for flame-retardant/flame resistant properties. while it may not be a principle-use product in building construction; it still has its applications.


RE: Rewrite...
By menace on 6/15/2010 1:57:45 PM , Rating: 2
Lithium is not a rare earth element. These are elements on the periodic table that range in atomic number from 57-71. Lithium has atomic number of 3. It is not even regarded as rare in terms of relative abundance.


RE: Rewrite...
By guacamojo on 6/14/2010 11:53:54 AM , Rating: 2
The NYT article also stated:
quote:
Pentagon officials said that their initial analysis at one location in Ghazni Province showed the potential for lithium deposits as large of those of Bolivia, which now has the world’s largest known lithium reserves.


Potential isn't the same as actual, but it does sound promising. Still, the iron and copper deposits seem more thoroughly mapped.

However you slice it, Afghanistan is going to be receiving a ton of foreign investment... are they ready to manage that influx of cash? Or are they going to squander it and
end up as penniless as MC Hammer?


RE: Rewrite...
By bobny1 on 6/14/2010 10:06:09 PM , Rating: 2
WOW!!. I thought the real reazon behind the war was the taliban and terrorism. But clearly is not even opium. This is obously something much bigger than oil...OMG!


RE: Rewrite...
By YashBudini on 6/14/2010 10:45:11 PM , Rating: 1
Other reasons include strategic and permanent military bases. You don't think we choose friends because they like us, do you? It's all about location, location, location.


Good!
By DEVGRU on 6/14/2010 10:59:56 AM , Rating: 2
Hopefully, over time this will give a huge injection in jobs and income to the Afghan economy, something that has nothing to do with cultivating and harvesting Poppy's for once.




RE: Good!
By kattanna on 6/14/2010 11:04:17 AM , Rating: 2
we will also have to hope it doesnt fall into the talibans hands


RE: Good!
By hughlle on 6/14/2010 12:23:39 PM , Rating: 2
what do you expect to happen? them stand by and watch america try and rape the country of their new wealth etc? it has been seen all over the world, rebels kidnapping and attacking over the ideal that the wealth belongs to the people.

then couple that with the $1Trillion news headline and the Talibans lust for funds for bigger and badder operations and you have a bit of a problem, you have a defense that can potentially rally supporters for their cause and then you have the potential money with which to fund dastardly deeds


RE: Good!
By Pirks on 6/14/2010 12:33:03 PM , Rating: 2
Mr. MQ-9 Reaper will take care of it.


RE: Good!
By drycrust3 on 6/14/2010 1:09:26 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
something that has nothing to do with cultivating and harvesting Poppy's for once


Errr ... cough cough ... if you look at the picture of the "processed lithium" ... doesn't it sort of look ... like processed ... poppies would?


What an obnoxious heading
By LyricalGenius on 6/14/2010 2:51:03 PM , Rating: 3
This belief of entitlement is the reason most of the world hates us. What gives us the right to go into a country and decide when and how their resource is extracted?

And forget about the argument that "it's going to create jobs". Who are you to decide what jobs the Afghani people should work in?

I really think that we should let the Afghani (or any "3rd world" nation for that matter) decide what's good for their own economy instead of sticking our heads into every single nation's decision making... at the end of the day there's not much "co-operation" between the u.s. and the afghani government...the U.S. tells the Afghani gov't what to do and they do it....that's all there is.




RE: What an obnoxious heading
By Redwin on 6/14/2010 4:19:03 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
What gives us the right to go into a country and decide when and how their resource is extracted?

You'll probably find this answer even more obnoxious than the headline, but that doesn't make it any less true.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Might_makes_right


RE: What an obnoxious heading
By niaaa on 6/15/2010 12:37:15 PM , Rating: 2
That's exactly what I am thinking...reading the article made me want to puke


Don't count on it
By Solandri on 6/14/2010 12:30:49 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
That close relationship may allows the U.S. to harvest the resources quite affordably. And it should allow U.S. corporations to easily enter the country and pursue development of the resources.

I know this is a popular conspiracy theory advocated by those trying to paint the U.S. as a self-interested country trying to use war to expand its corporate influence in the world. But it just doesn't work that way. Here are the result from Iraq's oil contract auction last year:

http://www.arabianoilandgas.com/article-6633-iraq-...

Not a single U.S. company won a contract.




RE: Don't count on it
By Beno on 6/16/2010 1:05:21 PM , Rating: 3
exxon is already working on a field.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/en...

try again!


Looks like life DOES imitate art after all.
By Director on 6/14/2010 4:50:54 PM , Rating: 3
Wow, so the Empire has found unobtanium on Pandora, I wonder what will happen next?

Not.




By YashBudini on 6/14/2010 10:59:22 PM , Rating: 2
It's not a question that this will be a double edged sword, it's only a question of the degree of underestimation as to how sharp the blade will be.


NO WAR FOR LITHIUM!
By Homerboy on 6/14/10, Rating: 0
RE: NO WAR FOR LITHIUM!
By JediJeb on 6/14/2010 2:36:07 PM , Rating: 2
The US could give away all of its money, resources and food for free to the entire world and still people would complain they are trying to rape the world.

US corporations will buy the resources, but the Taliban will take the resources if they get the chance. It's also funny how the US paid to repair the oil wells in Iraq yet not a single US company got a contract to produce the oil. Sometimes I wish the US would take every cent they spend outside the country and bring it back home and never hand out a bit, then all the world should be loving us since it seems the opposite happens when we just give our money away to them.


RE: NO WAR FOR LITHIUM!
By Beno on 6/16/2010 1:23:40 PM , Rating: 2
whats up with you and the other guy on US companies havent got a single contract?

ExxonMobil already have a field.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/en...


Penny
By Alphafox78 on 6/14/2010 11:22:11 AM , Rating: 3
Look, a Lithium penny!




Environmentally Friendly BAH!
By DoeBoy on 6/14/2010 11:02:29 AM , Rating: 1
Also, he's worried about possible environmental impact of the mining, stating, "The big question is, can this be developed in a responsible way, in a way that is environmentally and socially responsible? No one knows how this will work."

I would wager money that the techniques are methods they use for extraction will be circa 50 years ago and involve things like mountain top removal as well as dumping all the waste into valleys. They do it in WVA still so I can only imagine in an area like Afghanistan it will be much worse.




RE: Environmentally Friendly BAH!
By sleepeeg3 on 6/14/2010 5:07:00 PM , Rating: 1
I'm sure damaging those beautiful vistas in those Afghanistan tourist meccas are the first things on everyone's mind...


Interesting, but
By chromal on 6/14/2010 12:05:14 PM , Rating: 2
Interesting, but I don't think it's going to sway the NATO-Afghanistan situation much.




Conquer and Pillage
By NovoRei on 6/14/2010 12:07:18 PM , Rating: 2
Now(?) institutionalized by coporations and protected by US army.

Next on the list is Iran.




NOT NEWS
By Smilin on 6/14/2010 2:46:43 PM , Rating: 2
These are not new discoveries. It's been known long since before the war. It's just not financially lucrative to mine at this time.




What next?
By Aloonatic on 6/14/2010 5:25:05 PM , Rating: 2
You'll probably try to tell me that the UK went to war in the Falkalnds over more than the defending the honour of their sheep.

We all know that the only reason why the USA/UK/NATO are in Afghanistan is to find Bin-Ladin and get little girls into school. No more, no less.




By YashBudini on 6/14/2010 10:41:44 PM , Rating: 2
Jason, did you look at the graph? The total find is valued at $908 billion, of which iron, copper, and silver amount to about $700 billion of the total amount.

As for your title.....




By SittingBull on 6/14/2010 11:17:57 PM , Rating: 2
The title of the piece is incorrect. On the PBS news tonight they correctly disclosed that the Russians discovered these deposits back several decades ago when they were at war in Afghanistan. The Afghani geologists then hid the reports until about 2007 when they turned them over to the US army, which was looking for a way to boost the economy and get people away from growing opium.

This will still take decades to get up and running and likely won't happen as long as there is a war going on.




Foreign Dependent
By afkrotch on 6/14/2010 11:36:20 PM , Rating: 2
So we're working on getting off Middle Eastern oil for our cars, only to go into Middle Eastern lithium for our cars. That's great.

Not to mention, the screwed up way that Bolivia wants to run things.




Finally...
By corduroygt on 6/14/2010 3:46:10 PM , Rating: 1
What's keeping us from making Iraq and Afghanistan 51st and 52nd states? I'm sure the majority of people there would love to become US citizens and have the freedom and standard of living that comes with it. Anyone objects, f*ck political correctness and shoot them.




Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By Daniel8uk on 6/14/10, Rating: -1
RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By littlebitstrouds on 6/14/2010 11:12:20 AM , Rating: 2
Just say what you're trying to imply. This kind of commenting is as useful as news networks who simply imply through questioning things that are ridiculous and untrue.


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By Daniel8uk on 6/14/10, Rating: -1
RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By Amedean on 6/14/2010 11:26:35 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I guess the United States government can finally justify the countless deaths and the whole invasion. A few people can now become very very rich. Yay!


Wow, what a shallow statement! You don't need to respond-you already said it! Oh and "willyloman".......never heard of them......so this is where you get your news.


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By SublimeSimplicity on 6/14/2010 12:14:46 PM , Rating: 3
You are revealing your looter's mindset in your question. You believe that for someone to prosper someone else must suffer. For a society to work, people must exchange value for value, and in that way everyone prospers.

The simple answer to your question, is yes... although I'm sure you don't understand why.


By xkrakenx on 6/14/2010 4:09:03 PM , Rating: 2
For a society to work, people must exchange value for value, and in that way everyone prospers

tell that to the punk that spit on your big mac. Its never that simple anymore. Someone will always complain they are getting the shaft. and some self righteous hippie will tell them they are right to complain until we all have exactly the same stuff and nobody is 'rich'


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By Pirks on 6/14/2010 12:28:29 PM , Rating: 1
Of course yes. They're not going to import work force from other countries, are they?


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By Starcub on 6/14/2010 12:45:56 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just say what you're trying to imply.

He didn't have to. It was already implied in the NYT article when they referred to this 'discovery' as possibly leading to Afganistan becoming the Saudi Arabia of mineral deposits. The persistent pattern of international affairs in the global economic 'free market' is you try to broker a deal with easily corruptible leadership which you prop up with a relatively small amount of resources and in return get a great deal on that country's resources. No matter that that rest of the country hates your guts -- let them find refuge with terrorist extremists :P

Read "Confessions of an Economic Hitman" by John Perkins if you want to know how the world really works.

Trust me, the only people this discovery is a surprise to are some in the US general public.


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By quiksilvr on 6/14/2010 11:33:41 AM , Rating: 2
You do realize that by having such a technological push such as Lithium, this can create jobs for tens of thousands of people in Afghanistan.

This isn't something materialistic such as diamonds, which provide no purpose other than "OOH SHINY take off your pants!" This is a very important discovery that can really help push the EV movement.


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By Quadrillity on 6/14/2010 11:39:26 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
You do realize.....


No, he doesn't realize anything because he regurgitates every word that that liberal nut-job media tells him to.


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By Daniel8uk on 6/14/2010 1:00:15 PM , Rating: 2
I don't need to imply anything or pretend that I know something magical secret.

It's all there in the history books and if you knew anything about international business, or even business to be honest you'd know what will happen.

Yes, tens of thousands of jobs will be created, but I'm pretty certain those wages will border on the very edge of allowing that person to survive.


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By Quadrillity on 6/14/2010 5:50:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Yes, tens of thousands of jobs will be created, but I'm pretty certain those wages will border on the very edge of allowing that person to survive.


Exactly the response I would have expected to come from a liberal. If you don't make enough money to live comfortably, then maybe you should do like me and work your ASS OFF to earn college degrees or specialized training so you can become a professional with a CAREER . The key word is "earn" in the previous sentence.

Why do so many people in this world think that everything should be handed out on a silver platter? You always end up with examples like automotive union workers making $70 an hour to sweep a f****** floor!


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By Daniel8uk on 6/14/10, Rating: 0
By Quadrillity on 6/14/2010 9:43:24 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Firstly you say I'm a liberal, which I most certainly am not.

You expressed a very liberal ideal, so I put two and two together.
quote:
Secondly you're suggesting that I do NOT work my ass or have a professional career.

No I didn't. You are seeing things...
quote:
people in Afghanistan do NOT have access to the education like we do and the last time I checked there isn't an abundance of 'professional careers' going over in Afghanistan.

Then they should move the f*** out lol! If there was not an opportunity for me in this country then I would find another place to live.
quote:
They basically have a choice of manual labour which pays very very little or, well I'm not sure what the other choice is... live of scraps?

My family has lived off the land for generations! It's not a difficult concept, really. Its mentalities like yours that have evolved this nation to a "welfare" state in which people EXPECT free things.
quote:
Anyway, that union worker that you mention, why shouldn't he be paid $70 an hour, if he does a good job and works hard then in my opinion he's earned it.

....HAHAHAH! You can't be serious you moron! You think a broom pushing unskilled worker should be making that much money?? And you don't think you are liberal?

You were very quick to read way to deep into what I said. I never said that hard work shouldn't be rewarded; however, If I was in Afghanistan or any other third world country, I would work hard to move away, then work even harder to get a career in a good nation of opportunity. I have met lots of people that have done this, so don't even remark that it's rare, lucky, or impossible. Quit making excuses for the lazy and ignorant.


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By ARoyalF on 6/14/2010 1:08:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You do realize that by having such a technological push such as Lithium, this can create jobs for tens of thousands of people in Afghanistan This isn't something materialistic such as diamonds, which provide no purpose other than "OOH SHINY take off your pants!" This is a very important discovery that can really help push the EV movement


I couldn't agree more about the jobs for Afganis and the part about the curious property of diamonds and women's panties.


RE: Markets (Corporations) rejoice!
By JediJeb on 6/14/2010 2:17:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
This isn't something materialistic such as diamonds, which provide no purpose other than "OOH SHINY take off your pants!" This is a very important discovery that can really help push the EV movement.


It may make the batteries cheaper, but not sure how much it will push the EV movement until other advances are made.

As for materialistic it could be just as bad since currently Ev owners might say "Ohh its good for the environment, take off your pants!" ;)


good
By Murloc on 6/14/10, Rating: -1
RE: good
By Kanazozo on 6/14/2010 1:21:06 PM , Rating: 3
It was pretty obvious from the moment I read the heading that there were going to be anti-american commentators. It is unfortunate that we have to fear and defend the economic development of an entire country (and the creation of thousands and tens of thousands of jobs) simply because there is reference to the USA or capitalism/corportations.

As a previous poster stated, not a single American company won a 2009 contract for oil in Iraq. Yet, how many hundreds of millions is the government pouring into Iraq for infrastructure, fundamental skills training, and education (sciences and math; sorry, no indoctrination here) - each of which is the basis for a successfull and economically competitive country (whether America is there or not).

It isnt too much of a leap to say that yes, there will be American companies entering Afghanistan to INVEST in the infrastructure to build these mines. This involves water, roads, power, telecommunications equipment and more, not to mention thousands of jobs paying above average wages. Naysayers love to comment that wages will be below average, but you tell me - would you take a job that paid less than the one you have now? No - they will need to pay atleast as much or more to get the workforce they need to operate these things. Overall, the quality of life will improve and the country will be the better for it.

There will always be anti-american sentiment in the world, as there is always jealousy of the king of the hill - its human nature.


RE: good
By LyricalGenius on 6/14/2010 3:15:39 PM , Rating: 4
You have no idea how this works do you?

I happen to be American; just want to say this before beginning.

Where do you think the money to build the infrastructure comes from? U.S. doesn't just hand out free money and join hands with the Afghani (as hard as it is to believe).

Iraq/Afghanistan etc etc BORROW the money as LOANS from organizations such as the World Bank and the IMF, or from the U.S. with a caveat. All the infrastructure work needs to be done by AMERICAN companies (this helps us reclaim our loans almost immediately) and at the same time the countries STILL OWE the money that we lent them + INTEREST. This puts the countries in perpetual debt because most of the time the amount of money the we lend them is based on inflated forecasts for growth; figures that would never be met.

This is no conspiracy theory; it has been documented numerous times in books and online sources.

Have a nice day!


RE: good
By Kanazozo on 6/15/2010 12:38:05 PM , Rating: 2
Excellent - I do feel better informed on the subject. I would say that the focus of your response was almost entirely on one facet of the earlier post, however (source of funds infrastructure). Do you disagree that there will be a great deal of investment in infrastructure (regardless of the funding) that may not have been undertaken otherwise? Do you disagree that jobs will be created using local labor at average or above average wages?

We are all too familiar with perpetual debt, particuarly as the USA approaches a 1 for 1 ratio of debt to GDP. Investments in the things that take you from an aggregarian society (in this case, poppies) to something else cannot be frowned upon. I am assuming (correct me if Im wrong, please) that the use of American construction companies is the result of the Osama Bin Laden fiasco in the late 80's/early 90's. One cannot say if there is a better quality product produced by an American company versus a local company, but surely this is open to bid and the best bid wins. Also, should you reply back I would very much appreciate links to data that supports your assertations so that I may better understand your position.


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