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Prius Plug-in Hybrid on the left.
Toyota hopes to sell 50,000 Prius Plug-in Hybrids per year worldwide

Toyota's Prius has been a sales monster when it comes to hybrid vehicles. In the U.S. market, Honda has tried to attack the Prius with three generations of Civic Hybrids and two generations of Insight Hybrids only to fail miserably in matching its sales success.

With newcomers like the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf putting a greater emphasis on a healthy battery-only driving range, Toyota is looking to give its Prius some additional battery power. The new Prius Plug-in Hybrid makes use of a lithium-ion battery pack in place of the old NiMH battery pack. As a result, the Prius can travel up to 14.3 miles at 53 mph on battery power alone before standard Hybrid Synergy Drive system jumps into action. 

Since the newest Prius also features a charging port, drivers can plug their Prius into a wall outlet to recharge. Toyota says that the lithium-ion battery pack can be fully topped off in an hour and a half. Most importantly, Toyota says that the Prius Plug-in Hybrid can achieve this using a standard household power outlet and doesn't require the use of an expensive dedicated charger (or the associated installation costs). 

According to preliminary numbers, the Prius Plug-in Hybrid will reach 60 mph in a leisurely 10.7 seconds and reach a top speed of 112 mph. Also noteworthy is the fact that despite the more powerful battery pack used in the plug-in variant, the vehicle is only 110 pounds heavier than the standard Prius. 

Sales will start early next year for the Prius Plug-in Hybrid, and Toyota expects to sell 50,000 units per year worldwide. Unfortunately, we do not have pricing for the vehicle, although we'll be sure to bring you those figures when they become available.



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??
By Dr of crap on 9/14/2011 9:02:07 AM , Rating: 2
"...Honda has tried to attack the Prius with three generations of Civic Hybrids and two generations of Insight Hybrids only to fail miserably in matching its sales success."

Do you really think they have tried their best? Without matching or beating the mpgs of the Prius how can they compete with Toyota!




RE: ??
By Targon on 9/14/2011 10:11:40 AM , Rating: 3
Hype sells more than anything else these days, look at Apple as an example of that.


RE: ??
By drycrust3 on 9/14/2011 12:10:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Without matching or beating the mpgs of the Prius how can they compete with Toyota!

The reason Honda hasn't competed well with the Prius is because they haven't understood the market and produced a product for that market. Who are the people that buy the Prius?
My observation in New Zealand (where I live) is that the Prius is popular with taxi drivers (where leisurely acceleration is acceptable), so why hasn't Honda produced a car that taxi drivers like? Or why doesn't Honda target their hybrids to other professional drivers like couriers? Sure, couriers want a van that accelerates quicker than what a taxi driver needs, but that is a function of the power and weight of the electric motor, once the right speed is attained the additional power consumption isn't much greater than for the small motor.


RE: ??
By Dr of crap on 9/14/2011 1:14:05 PM , Rating: 2
Taxi drivers??? Maybe in New Zealand.

That is my point. Honda doesn't know their hybrid buyers. Hybrid buyers buy to save the envirionment and/or gas. If your mpg isn't as high as the other guy what is the insentive to buy you hybrid? Honda should AT LEAST have comparable mpg numbers on their hybrids, but they are below and even far below.

I don't sell or make cars and even I can see that.


RE: ??
By Solandri on 9/14/2011 1:34:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Do you really think they have tried their best? Without matching or beating the mpgs of the Prius how can they compete with Toyota!

Unfortunately, the mpg scale is inverted. The higher the mpg mileage, the less fuel you are saving for a 1 mpg improvement. e.g. Going from 25 to 29 mpg saves more fuel than going from 40 to 50 mpg. Going from 10 to 11 mpg saves almost twice as much fuel as going from 40 to 50 mpg. So really the mpg advantage of the Prius over the Hondas shouldn't matter as much as it does to most people. It's just a baseless marketing advantage for high mileage vehicles.

The EPA is attempting to correct this. If you look at the new EPA stickers, it'll list gallons per 100 miles in smaller print under mpg. That's the number you really want to be looking at to see how much fuel you'll save. Measured that way you get:

2.0 Prius
2.4 Civic hybrid
4.0 typical sedan
6.7 typical SUV

These numbers convert directly into dollars. If you spent $670 over the summer fueling your SUV, you would have spent $400 driving a sedan, $240 with a Civic hybrid, and $200 with a Prius.


RE: ??
By Spuke on 9/14/2011 3:49:37 PM , Rating: 2
l
quote:
These numbers convert directly into dollars. If you spent $670 over the summer fueling your SUV, you would have spent $400 driving a sedan, $240 with a Civic hybrid, and $200 with a Prius.
Very nice! Haven't noticed the gallons per 100 mile deal yet. I'll look next time I'm at the dealer.


Not Viable!
By garagetinkerer on 9/14/2011 10:19:42 AM , Rating: 3
Is it only me who thinks that paying more for something of little practicality is idiotic? I mean you pay more for a car, and not only it is slow, but also there are other considerations sometimes (design and luxury etc). Since when paying more to get only less became fashionable?




RE: Not Viable!
By stimudent on 9/14/11, Rating: 0
14.5 miles?
By Chernobyl68 on 9/14/2011 12:34:25 PM , Rating: 2
How far does it get with the AC and CD player running?




household outlet
By Chernobyl68 on 9/14/2011 12:39:17 PM , Rating: 2
Plugging in the hybrid to a conventional household outlet will drive up your household electric rates. You need the special outlet installation in order to get cheaper electricity for charging at night.




14.5 miles
By chmilz on 9/14/11, Rating: -1
RE: 14.5 miles
By kjboughton on 9/14/2011 1:11:59 AM , Rating: 4
Right, because we all have oodles of time in our day to go on a 14.5 mile walk.

Don't forget, some of us have to work or the lights go out.


RE: 14.5 miles
By Jedi2155 on 9/14/2011 3:47:52 AM , Rating: 2
I would if I could, but I'm currently working 50 hours/week plus taking 2 courses towards my Masters in systems engineering degree. I can only spare about 2 hours a week in gym time. I think biking is possible but for most of us, we're lazy bastards and prefer to drive.


RE: 14.5 miles
By Lord 666 on 9/14/2011 10:21:03 AM , Rating: 3
Or its raining or snowing.


RE: 14.5 miles
By heffeque on 9/14/2011 4:32:42 PM , Rating: 2
It also rains and snows in countries like Norway, the Netherlands or Sweden... and they use their bikes A LOT.
Just sayin'


RE: 14.5 miles
By TSS on 9/14/2011 6:00:17 AM , Rating: 3
Take it from me, i don't have a drivers licence nor do my parents, you're not going to use a bike for errands more then a mile away. I'd love to see you ride a bike for 15 miles with 2 grocery bags on the steering wheel in the rain at 8 degrees celcius comming home from work. Nobody wants to do that. The only people that ride a bike for that distance is highschool kids living in villages around the city and go to school in the city. And i can assure you as soon as they turn 16 they turn to scooters and mopeds (driving age here is 18).

Americans are fat because of the quality and quanity of food they shove down their throats. Here in holland, the only 2 fat people i know are so because 1 has other health problems causing it, and the other simply loves to cook and eat. I know of 1 person that was becomming fat and stopped it in time, a college buddy of mine. Know the cause? He drinks lots of alcohol. Unlike popular belief, that doesn't give you a beer belly. What does give you that belly is the fat crap you eat while intoxicated. He stopped eating so much potato chips when drunk, and he magically stopped getting fatter (actually lost a bit of weight after that).

Excersize is important if you want to lose weight. If you want to stop gaining weight stop stuffing your face.


RE: 14.5 miles
By riottime on 9/14/2011 7:39:17 AM , Rating: 1
but fat is caused by the fat gene! it's not a person's fault at all. it's a hereditary condition past down by your ancestors. it's not the fat person's fault. it's their dna's fault. :P

having said that, i would love owning a prius. unfortunately, living in apt can't plug in to charge so that's out of the question. :(


RE: 14.5 miles
By Spuke on 9/14/11, Rating: 0
RE: 14.5 miles
By garagetinkerer on 9/14/2011 10:21:32 AM , Rating: 4
A VW Polo Blue-Motion gets 70+, so why are you paying more this hybrid?


RE: 14.5 miles
By p3ngwin on 9/14/11, Rating: 0
RE: 14.5 miles
By drycrust3 on 9/14/2011 11:30:49 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
what's the polution like coiming out of that VW

CO2 + H2O, just like what you breath out.


RE: 14.5 miles
By Dr of crap on 9/14/2011 1:04:53 PM , Rating: 2
Yea, it's about the great styling, too!!!

HA HA


RE: 14.5 miles
By twhittet on 9/14/2011 11:42:02 AM , Rating: 2
What's the actual EPA rating on it? 70+ Euro is not 70+ EPA.


RE: 14.5 miles
By Spuke on 9/14/2011 1:26:47 PM , Rating: 2
It's not sold in the US so not likely tested here.


RE: 14.5 miles
By Spuke on 9/14/2011 3:32:55 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
A VW Polo Blue-Motion gets 70+, so why are you paying more this hybrid?
Why are you recommending a car that isn't sold in the US?


RE: 14.5 miles
By Black1969ta on 9/14/2011 10:20:42 PM , Rating: 2
Because this is the Internet, as in International network, not Usanet as in USA network only. He is just mentioning a vehicle that is local to him. but he raises a good point, manufacturers can make cars that get better MPG than the almighty Prius, but people need to demand it. And accept the downsides that come with it.


RE: 14.5 miles
By Targon on 9/14/2011 10:10:22 AM , Rating: 2
It's still only 7.7 miles each way as your maximum range on all-electric...that isn't far enough to be worth spending that money.


RE: 14.5 miles
By AmbroseAthan on 9/14/2011 1:57:49 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Know the cause? He drinks lots of alcohol. Unlike popular belief, that doesn't give you a beer belly. What does give you that belly is the fat crap you eat while intoxicated.

I normally would not pick on something like this, but I lived with a nutritionist for 4 years, and dated another one recently and am still friends with both. The unfortunate truth is drinking in large amounts will generally make you gain weight, unless you specifically modify your diet to handle it.

Beer (and alcohol) in general is a serious problem for people's weight when done in excess. The average "regular" beer (12oz can) is around 150 calories, while a light beer is 100 calories. If you took someone who should have 2,500 calories a day, and they go out for a night and have 6 drinks, they are looking at 600-850 calories, just from what they drank.

In the end (barring medical conditions), calories are about the only thing that matters for people's weight. Most people will not offset this with extra exercise or less food, and if you do this a few times a week, you will see the pounds add up quickly.


RE: 14.5 miles
By TSS on 9/16/2011 9:05:04 AM , Rating: 2
You obviously haven't spent any time with alcoholists then. Otherwise you'd know it's perfectly possible to lose weight just by drinking beer and not-eating anything on the side. You do need a couple of supplements, but it's possible.

You can stuff your body with calories all you want if your system doesn't absorb said calories, your not getting any fatter.

both the buddy mentioned and another one aren't fat, and they drink atleast 3 litres of beer each day, with atleast 4 in the weekend. I'm not saying that's good, i am saying they need to cut back and they both know it. But i'm also saying that beer alone simply does not make you fat.


RE: 14.5 miles
By danjw1 on 9/14/2011 3:48:27 PM , Rating: 2
3.3 mph is the normal human walking speed. Maybe a bike, but I hate riding bikes. :-) I do walk a lot within a few miles of my home, but a lot of shopping is further then that from where I live. So, walking isn't always an option.


WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By Beenthere on 9/14/11, Rating: -1
RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By quiksilvr on 9/14/11, Rating: -1
RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By mcnabney on 9/14/2011 1:01:22 AM , Rating: 2
You do know that electricity from the wall outlet isn't free, right?


RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By Jedi2155 on 9/14/2011 3:43:53 AM , Rating: 2
Efficiency of a gas engine is typically 20-30% so its actually 12.3 kWH/gallon (energy equivalent). So at $0.14/kWH its $1.72/gallon.

Here is a simple calculator for you if you want to know the pure dollar savings.
http://www.sce.com/nrc/pev/index.html


By Philippine Mango on 9/14/2011 6:47:41 AM , Rating: 2
If you use the fueleconomy.gov website, input the cost per KWH of say $0.12 for an electric vehicle, it will, in parenthesis directly covert that into a gasoline cost equivalent of around $4 per gallon.


By Jedi2155 on 9/14/2011 12:42:47 PM , Rating: 2
While I believe the possibility of that, as it seems many would like to rate EV's with MPGe values that highly inflate their MPG values. Please provide a link to that source.


RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By Beenthere on 9/14/11, Rating: 0
RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By Samus on 9/14/2011 5:18:59 AM , Rating: 3
Philippine Mango...

Where in the hell do you live where electricity is 4 cents/kWh?

And don't say the Philippines. 4 cents? WHERE? France!?

The lowest electric rates in North America are in North Dakota at 7 cents/kWh, the national average is 12 cents/kWh, and the highest rates are on the west coast and Hawaii, which is 26 cents/kWh. The average cost of electricity in California, the largest market for the Prius, is 15.8 cents/kWh, or quadruple the cost you used as an example, making that $500 savings over the course of a year closer to $125.

So basically over a 5 year period, you save about $600 bucks owning a Prius, an ugly, expensive car with no soul. You'll be lucky to break even over a 10-year period over, say, a Toyota Matrix, a similar-sized car that costs thousands less, has better resale value, holds more stuff, and is much simpler to own and maintain.


RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By lelias2k on 9/14/11, Rating: -1
RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By FITCamaro on 9/14/2011 7:37:51 AM , Rating: 1
So you're defending the argument while still not knowing if the rates are even available. Brilliant.


RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By Samus on 9/14/2011 9:37:12 AM , Rating: 1
SDG&E? LOL.

Having lived in San Diego for many years, I'll simplify this lack of an arguement with two words: tiered rates.

I grew a little pot one Summer in San Diego and fell into the uncomfortable 39 cent/kWh bracket.

People who charge their Prius on a daily basis will feel the same uncomfort. At 39 cents a killowatt hour, your basically paying 13 dollars a gallon equivilent for gas.

At least according to the EPA's 12 cents/kWh=1 gallon @ $4.00 bullcrap rule.

Listen, there is no defending this ridiculous car. Your paying more for something that will cost you more to operate and maintain, looking like a tool while doing so. Is there even a need to additionally detail how harmful the Prius is to the environment to assemble? It's gotten better since they finally scrapped the idea of putting a dozen lead-acid batteries under the trunk, but dangerous materials are still sourced and shipped all around the world to make this thing, then finally ship it HERE, where hopefully those materials will be recycled properly when the thing is junked...


By Keeir on 9/14/2011 2:42:20 PM , Rating: 2
Hello Friend,

Its true that San Diego charges a pretty fortune for EV charging. They will let you isolate the EV from the rest of your bill however.
http://www.sdge.com/environment/cleantransportatio...

However, there are utilities in the Lower 48 states that are chargins 6, 7, 8 cents per kWh for offpeak electric charging.

Even at the 16.7 cents per kWh, an electric vechiles will travel a mile on ~5.6 cents. Even a Prius requires ~8 cents of gasoline per mile.

Now you can rant and rave... or you could realize that for many people in this country at the 6, 7, 8 cent rates stand to save ~4-5 cents per mile traveled... which works out to be 4,000-5,000 over a fairly short time frame.


RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By Sahrin on 9/14/2011 8:52:32 AM , Rating: 2
The Matrix has terrible resale value. The Prius's resale is dependent on the price of gas; but seeing as how it hasn't dipped below $3.00 in 8 months (despite the fact that demand is down) the resale market for a Prius is quite strong. I would gladly sell a Prius over a Matrix any day.


RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By Samus on 9/14/2011 9:49:19 AM , Rating: 2
The Prius resale ratio favors it as its mileage increases (ironically...) but the fact of the matter is, today, with 50,001 miles, a 2007 Matrix has lost 32% of its initial value, and a 2007 Prius has lost 36% of its initial value. At 100,000 miles, a 2007 Matrix has lost 45% of its initial value, and a 2007 Prius has lost 44% of its initial value, basically a wash.

All figures for the base model of each car in consume resale value, not dealer trade-in (although dealers appear to favor the Prius)

http://www.motortrend.com/cars/2007/toyota/matrix/...

http://www.automobilemag.com/am/99/2007/toyota/pri...

Don't forget to look at the Ownership Cost charts. Depriciation isn't the only area the Prius loses in. Higher maintenance costs, more expensive to repair, and more expensive to insure.


RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By CK804 on 9/14/2011 10:20:57 AM , Rating: 2
Higher maintenance costs? Please explain. The Prius uses AC traction motors, which means there are no brushes to replace. There's also no transmission fluid to change because there's no mechanical transmission. Brake pads are expected to last well over 100,000 miles because the car primarily uses dynamic (regenerative) braking.


RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By Samus on 9/14/11, Rating: 0
By priuspete on 9/15/2011 1:33:42 AM , Rating: 2
According to truedelta.com, a 2006 Prius typically needed 1/3 fewer repair trips than a 2006 Civic and 70% fewer than a 2007 VW GTI. Problem-prone components such as starter motors, alternators and transmissions are replaced in the Prius with the highly reliable synergy drive motor-generator-transaxle. My 2004 has lots of brake pad left after 120,000 miles. A Prius taxi has logged 1 million km (the traction battery lasted 700,000 km).

Toyota did a recall to replace the inverter coolant pump on the 2004-2006 Prius. Even though the warranty had long expired, they replaced the pump with an improved design at no cost. They do care about customer satisfaction.

The Prius may not meet your needs or your tastes, but a million buyers have found it to be a practical, reliable and cost-effective vehicle. Its successful introduction by Toyota has spurred all car companies to re-examine how to make vehicle drive trains more efficient. I expect the plug-in Prius will also work well for many buyers. The Prius is not a stupid choice.


By Sahrin on 10/13/2011 11:42:32 AM , Rating: 2
>All figures for the base model of each car in consume resale value, not dealer trade-in (although dealers appear to favor the Prius)

I'm talking about the wholesale market; where the price originates. Retail prices have distorting influences caused by sales efforts; wholesale prices reflect the market price for a car at a given time. (Yes, I work in the auto industry and by and sell cars in the thousands - trust me, the Matrix sucks. There are times ($2/gal) when the Prius sucks as much or more, but this ain't one of them.


RE: WOW a wopping 14.5 miles - STOP the presses
By Shark Tek on 9/14/2011 9:06:52 AM , Rating: 2
Are considering the factor of time?

Having to spend 5-10 minutes in a gas station filling up your car more often in a non hybrid car is something to consider too in the equation.


By Wy White Wolf on 9/14/2011 9:28:05 AM , Rating: 2
So let's fully consider the time factor. I only have to fill up once every two weeks now. The plugin will drop that to maybe once a month saving me a max of 10 minutes a month.

But then I will need to plug and unplug the thing every day I use it. so even if I only spend only 1 minute each time that costs me 2 minutes a day or 44 minutes over a 22 day work month.


By Keeir on 9/14/2011 2:11:54 PM , Rating: 2
Ouch.

Okay, Lets assume you have a car that gets 30 MPG and a fill-up is ~12 gallons. That means every 14 days you travel ~360 miles. Or ~25 miles a day. If the Prius Plug truely gives you around 14.5 miles... your daily gasoline usage should fall from ~.85 gallon to ~.21 gallon. If your current interval is ~14 days, your new interval should be around ~45 days... or yearly fill ups should reduce from 100 to ~35. Yearly times savings will be approx 5h - 10h.

Plugging/Unplugging a Hybrid should take approx. 10 seconds. Assuming you plug/unplug it 800 times a year (more than 1 trip a day on average), this should be ~2-3h a year.

Overall, its not too much of a time sink/savings... but I'd much rather take a extra few seconds a day in my garage rather than stand outside in rain, snow, humidy etc.


By Chernobyl68 on 9/14/2011 12:35:42 PM , Rating: 2
I've averaged closer to 14K a year.


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