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The memristor looks unassuming; here's a single titanium dioxide memristor up close.  (Source: J. J. Yang, HP Labs)

HP has created the world's first memristor circuit. Researchers cut out transistors from the bottom layer of this silicon-based chip (shown in yellow and blue) and replaced them with fewer memristors in the top layer (shown in red). The device showcases the power of the memristors.  (Source: Qiangfei Xia, HP )
HP's new integral circuit component allows engineers to produce identical logic circuits using fewer transistors and less space

The goal of chipmakers has always been to push Moore's Law, squeezing more and more transistors into a smaller space.  But what if you could do more with fewer transistors?  That's the intriguing potential of HP's memristor, which joins the standard resistor, the capacitor, and the inductors as a fabled fourth integral circuit component.

First envisioned in 1971 by Berkeley professor Leon Chua, a memristor is a device which can vary its resistance based on the magnitude and direction of the voltage of an applied signal.  Furthermore, it retains its resistance state even if it is powered off.

Rediscovering Professor Chua's groundbreaking, but largely overlooked work, engineers and researchers at HP Labs dug into the problem of creating a memristor on the nanoscale.  In May they finally succeeded, creating the world's first memristor.

This week at the newly created Memristor and Memristor Systems Symposium, in Berkeley, CA the true potential of the unleashed memristor has finally begun to be seen.  One thing is clear -- the little device has the potential to rock the entire hardware industry.

When paired with transistors, memristors can be used to create new and unique circuits that function exactly like circuits with many more transistors.  The new circuits are much smaller and consume far less power.  In short, memristors allow you to do more with less.

Lead researcher Stan Williams, a senior research fellow at HP, states, "We're trying to give Moore's Law a boost."

Indeed, HP's new invention could allow licensed chipmakers to not only continue Moore's law, but to almost instantly leap ahead, shifting Moore's law years ahead.  Williams describes this new mentality, stating, "We're not trying to crowd more transistors onto a chip or into a particular circuit.  Hybrid memristor-transistor chips really have the promise for delivering a lot more performance."

In the past chipmakers have developed circuit elements consisting of multiple transistors to do the job that a single memristor does.  By chopping out these transistors and putting a memristor in their place, the circuit uses less power and is shrunk.  HP has demonstrated such a deployment in the first ever working memristor-transistor hybrid chip

Mr. Williams says making the device was easier than expected.  He states, "Because memristors are made of the same materials used in normal integrated circuits it turns out to be very easy to integrate them with transistors."

Mr. Williams and HP researcher Qiangfei Xia led a team which developed the circuit, a new type of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) which uses far fewer transistors by employing semiconductor titanium dioxide memristors. 

FPGAs are reprogrammable hardware circuits, one of the hottest fields in computer engineering today.  While FPGAs are frequently used by engineers to test their circuit designs on a smaller scale, as they're reconfigurable, they're too expensive, slow, and power-hungry for normal circuits.  Typically they are replaced by leaner dedicated circuits based on the optimized FPGA design.  Mr. Williams continues, "When you decide what logic operation you want to do, you actually flip a bunch of switches and configuration bits in the circuit.  What we're looking at is essentially pulling out all of the configuration bits and all of the transistor switches."

The new memristor-sporting FPGA design is more compact, more affordable, and uses far less power.  In short, it could become the first FPGA to be a viable competitor to dedicated silicon circuits.  The potential is impressive; imagine buying AMD or NVIDIA's latest graphics card and receiving regular hardware updates to increase performance and remove errata.  As Mr. Williams puts it, "If our ideas work out, this type of FPGA will completely change the balance."

Aside from traditional processing circuits, memristors are also very promising for flash memory, and could greatly reduce its cost.

HP researchers say that the biggest obstacle to memristor circuits is the lack of familiarity among engineers with the device.  However Mr. Williams and others at HP assure that the public will see memristor circuits within three years, and that the device has the potential to eventually transform the entire computing industry.



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Who is the HP girl.....
By Cheesew1z69 on 11/26/2008 11:34:39 AM , Rating: 2
She is cute, and link to the pic? :)




RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By JasonMick (blog) on 11/26/2008 11:36:24 AM , Rating: 5
RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By Motoman on 11/26/2008 12:05:42 PM , Rating: 2
I <3 her. I <3 her a lot.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By MrJim003 on 11/26/2008 12:22:49 PM , Rating: 2
Why did you use this pic.. and What is the girls name?


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By kattanna on 11/26/2008 12:34:04 PM , Rating: 3
this isnt the first time you have used her, but please feel free to continue

:>)


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By maverick85wd on 11/26/2008 1:06:43 PM , Rating: 1
A Chinese girl, eh? One more reason for world peace :-)

CAN'T WE ALL JUST BE FRIENDS?!?

And I agree with kattanna, use her pic as much as you like!


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By SublimeSimplicity on 11/26/2008 2:52:55 PM , Rating: 5
The best thing about her being chinese is that even if she's one in a million, there are over a thousand more just like her.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By majBUZZ on 11/26/2008 8:59:11 PM , Rating: 2
That comment deserves a 6


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By NubWobble on 11/26/08, Rating: 0
By mmcdonalataocdotgov on 12/1/2008 8:53:27 AM , Rating: 3
Well, she is cute, no matter what. And if they all took their make up off, she would be in the same rank, so the make up comment doesn't buy you anything.

And many women don't care about cash. Just the pretty faces with nothing behind them. Fact is, she was probably snatched up by an HP marketing exec anyway.

But really, the shape of the epidermis on the front of a girls' skull is no basis for a relationship anyway.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By maverick85wd on 11/27/2008 9:18:26 PM , Rating: 2
I agree, it does deserve a six.

side note: seriously, rated down? some people will take offense to ANYTHING.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By Lifted on 11/27/2008 2:34:05 AM , Rating: 4
If it's really one in a million, I wouldn't count on it. She's half European.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By Fireshade on 11/28/2008 4:32:37 AM , Rating: 2
Not necessarily half-European.
She could have had a eye-lid job. And of course the hair is coloured. That brouwn-black is typically very popular in China/Korea/Taiwan/Japan.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By vic5014 on 12/3/2008 1:22:15 AM , Rating: 2
Eye-lid surgery is very popular in certain parts of Asia and so is the brown/black hair color. Apparently its what you get when you try to dye black hair blond. Now if she were a natural blond or a redhead, I'd have to agree.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By cokbun on 11/26/2008 10:30:06 PM , Rating: 5
hmm maybe i should put hp stickers on my girlfriend


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By BruceLeet on 11/26/2008 11:48:58 PM , Rating: 5
HP Girl: I needed the money, I was desperate

She must be putting herself through college, I wonder whats going to happen when she becomes the head of a major oem manufacturer and these pictures are discovered. Or if her kids learn she was a techno-whore.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By JonnyDough on 11/28/2008 2:26:16 PM , Rating: 2
If that was my teenage slut mother I'd be proud, and slightly unnerved at myself for being interested in my mom.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By Jedi2155 on 11/27/2008 12:40:19 AM , Rating: 2
There is a girl who looks like that in one of my engineering courses....zomg.....too bad she's crazy :).


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By Cheesew1z69 on 11/26/2008 11:36:34 AM , Rating: 2
Nevermind, found it :)


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By bdot on 11/26/2008 11:57:30 AM , Rating: 5
Yeah! Hot HP girl is back. God this is an interesting article, so soft and roun... what am i reading again?


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By Chernobyl68 on 11/26/2008 1:20:54 PM , Rating: 2
yay! HP girl!


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By niva on 11/26/2008 2:40:33 PM , Rating: 2
Two very different sets of conversations going on in the comments :)

I'll join this one!


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By JonnyDough on 11/28/2008 2:30:10 PM , Rating: 2
If she's "in this conversation" I may have to throw my heterosexuality to the wind and join the convo too! But can I see YOUR pic first? Wow, you look just like Britney Spears. In fact, I think I saw that same picture in the Wal-mart checkout line.

Wait, never mind. You're post-Kevin Britney. Ewwwwww!


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By JonnyDough on 11/28/2008 2:31:36 PM , Rating: 2
Is it still funny to make fun of Britney Spears?

Britney who? Are you serious?


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By MrJim003 on 11/26/2008 12:24:30 PM , Rating: 2
Where did you find it


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By snownpaint on 11/28/2008 10:53:57 AM , Rating: 4
Funny... They are talking about something that is going to turn the computer industry upside-down, and push the world into a new realm of computing. (SSD)HD, Memory, Processor on one chip. But the geeks you all are, are memorized by the HP girl photo. Yeah she is hot, but dame, so are the chicks when you Google "super hottie". You boys need to get out to the malls and book stores more often and talk to some hotties.


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By JonnyDough on 11/28/2008 2:39:36 PM , Rating: 1
While those on here who are serious about hot girls are pretty much sad and pathetic like you're saying, I have to admit that it's still fun to pretend to be a chauvinistic jerk checking out women like they're fine race horse stock - because I'm NOT one. Notice I said PRETEND. I pride myself on being a giving guy and helping women with their problems, not giving them more. Guys who can only think with their "down there" part and treat women like property aren't men at all. Real men have control of THEMSELVES and not other people.

/fatherly lesson for today's aged little boys


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By HollyDOL on 11/29/2008 8:11:49 AM , Rating: 2
Have to admit that girl is really nice. Though as it often tends to be, they are cute as long as they keep their mouth shut. When you realise they are totaly 'empty inside', the magic is going to disappear pretty fast.

And as such, for me she'll stay beautiful forever since I have like zero chance to ever meet her :-)


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By JonnyDough on 12/1/2008 4:47:00 AM , Rating: 2
I don't have to admit nuthin. But if you look like her I'll admit anything you want if you give me your number. I don't want it because you look like her, but because you look like her AND have a brain. Actually, as long as you're moderately attractive you don't have to look EXACTLY like her either. :-)


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By HollyDOL on 12/4/2008 4:02:52 PM , Rating: 2
Erm, that kind of suggest I am a girl... that is a common mistake due to my nickname (which was somehow inherited from my PC name).


RE: Who is the HP girl.....
By Mikescool on 11/30/2008 4:17:47 PM , Rating: 2
She looks like my girlfriend!!!!! yes, i know i'm lucky.


Inductors
By ChronoReverse on 11/26/2008 11:29:58 AM , Rating: 5
quote:
That's the intriguing potential of HP's memristor, which joins the standard resistor, the capacitor, and the transistors as a fabled fourth integral circuit component.


I'm pretty sure transistors aren't a basic circuit element like the resistor and capacitor. Memristers correspond to resistors as capacitors correspond with inductors IIRC.




RE: Inductors
By AnnihilatorX on 11/26/08, Rating: -1
RE: Inductors
By VashHT on 11/26/2008 12:00:00 PM , Rating: 5
I think what he is saying is the 4 basic circuit elements should be resistor, memristor, capacitor and inductor. I'm pretty sure he is right too.


RE: Inductors
By Mitch101 on 11/26/2008 12:54:00 PM , Rating: 2
Guessing my Boolean algebra will need to be updated to something new.


RE: Inductors
By PandaBear on 11/26/2008 1:02:15 PM , Rating: 2
Boolean is in the digital domain, this is in the analog domain, one level lower than the boolean logics.


RE: Inductors
By Motoman on 11/26/08, Rating: 0
RE: Inductors
By Motoman on 11/26/08, Rating: 0
RE: Inductors
By the goat on 11/26/08, Rating: 0
RE: Inductors
By AnnihilatorX on 11/26/2008 12:15:31 PM , Rating: 2
You can actually use transistor as a diode but not the other way round in terms of discrete components.

For integrated circuits, you can build transistor out of diodes.


RE: Inductors
By AnnihilatorX on 11/26/2008 12:17:31 PM , Rating: 2
erm I meant semiconductor level, not integrated circuit level


RE: Inductors
By the goat on 11/26/2008 12:50:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
For integrated circuits, you can build transistor out of diodes.


Yes, a BJT is basically a couple of diodes. How about a FET though?


RE: Inductors
By JonnyDough on 11/28/2008 2:34:56 PM , Rating: 2
Both a BJT and an FET are not as flux as a WET RAT though. Yes, that was me pretending to understand what you meant and chime in.

You know I don't speak Spanish!


RE: Inductors
By TheBaker on 11/26/2008 12:21:23 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
By my count the first four are: resistor, capacitor, diode , and transistor.


I guess it's a good thing we're not going by your count then, rather by the established laws of electrical engineering. Both transistors and diodes are two-function elements that can be simulated by combining two fundamental elements.


RE: Inductors
By the goat on 11/26/2008 12:53:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I guess it's a good thing we're not going by your count then, rather by the established laws of electrical engineering. Both transistors and diodes are two-function elements that can be simulated by combining two fundamental elements.


You are saying the only fundamental elements are resistors and capacitors (plus the new memristor)? Please explain how to construct a diode or a transistor out of only resistors and capacitors.


RE: Inductors
By ChronoReverse on 11/26/2008 1:20:23 PM , Rating: 2
The difference is one set is Active and the other set is Passive.

Resisters, capacitors, inductors and now memristers are considered passive circuit units.

Transistors and diodes are part of the class of active circuit units and while are certainly elementary circuit units, are usually not grouped with the other class.


RE: Inductors
By ChronoReverse on 11/26/2008 1:22:26 PM , Rating: 2
I'll note that this is what I remember from courses way back but when I think about it right now, I'm wondering why diodes wouldn't be passive. There's probably a good reason but I can't think of any atm.


RE: Inductors
By semo on 11/26/2008 4:46:55 PM , Rating: 2
diodes are passive components. transistors are active


RE: Inductors
By RaynorWolfcastle on 11/26/2008 1:36:21 PM , Rating: 4
Stop all this nonsense.

Transistors are not basic circuit elements, nor are diodes. Diodes are, in fact, nothing more than non-linear resistors in terms of their transfer function. Transistors are more complex devices that can be made from the more basic elements.

Memristors are a basic circuit element as their transfer function links magnetic flux to charge. None of the other circuit elements have this hysteresis property.


RE: Inductors
By Jedi2155 on 11/26/2008 11:15:05 PM , Rating: 4
Mmmm, I love it when you talk hysteresis to me.....;)....just wait till I hit my magnetic saturation point :O!


RE: Inductors
By mattclary on 11/26/2008 2:21:21 PM , Rating: 4
resistor, capacitor, and inductor are the first three. The transistor should not be part of that set.


RE: Inductors
By DatabaseMX on 11/26/2008 3:42:02 PM , Rating: 2
"quote:
That's the intriguing potential of HP's memristor, which joins the standard resistor, the capacitor, and the transistors as a fabled fourth integral circuit component. "

The article states - and I quote:
"which joins the standard resistor, the capacitor, and the INDUCTORS as a fabled fourth integral circuit component."


Another 3-5 years...?
By MadMan007 on 11/26/2008 12:51:28 PM , Rating: 4
Let's see if this is another one of the ever present '3-5 years away from application' technologies or not. I like reading about this stuff but it's just geeky cool tech pron until actual real products are announced. I hope HP licenses it and lets others that have huge production facilities run with it.

I don't know about this though...
quote:
imagine buying AMD or NVIDIA's latest graphics card and receiving regular hardware updates to increase performance and remove errata.
I can see AMD maybe doing that but greedyNV? Hardly...they'd rather sell you the same chip repackaged through 3 generations and neutered by driver limitations than update the old one.




RE: Another 3-5 years...?
By SavagePotato on 11/26/2008 12:56:37 PM , Rating: 5
Or release buggy products they can fix later to meet deadlines. RE: my separate post on the subject.

Or ransom performance to you with payed upgrades, I could see that being Nvidia's style.


RE: Another 3-5 years...?
By Lightnix on 11/26/2008 2:49:40 PM , Rating: 2
Then we get back to the whole 'hardware piracy' problem that also comes up in discussion about nano-technology microprocessor fabrication sci-fi style stuff.

I for one would love to be able to buy a geforce 9600 GSO and have it upgraded to 9800 GTX+ just by torrenting some weird chip design patch.


RE: Another 3-5 years...?
By Kamasutra on 12/1/2008 4:09:28 PM , Rating: 2
Or possibly better yet, a chip design patch to get the most out of the specific game you're playing. This could also do wonders for GPGPU computing.


RE: Another 3-5 years...?
By Ringold on 11/26/2008 4:21:59 PM , Rating: 2
First of all, AMD could use some greed and capitalist drive like that seen in Nvidia. If they don't.. they'll cease to exist.

Or maybe not. Maybe we'll bail them out too. Why the hell not at this point?

But moving on.. second of all.. I would think you'd still buy new chips. More of these new kinds of circuits, smaller ones on new manufacturing processes, etc. Performance could thus still be improved, no? Just like the 'tick' in Intel's tick-tock cycle. Or maybe it's the tock. Which ever.

They could also charge, as others have pointed out, for the hardware updates. Given all the money that goes in to design, that would only be fair. Maybe minor patches for a given design could be free, but whole new designs with large gains/advantages.. no way.


RE: Another 3-5 years...?
By foolsgambit11 on 11/26/2008 4:42:44 PM , Rating: 2
How long will HP's patent be on this? Because that's how long it will be before we see it in the majority of applications, I'd say. Why bother licensing memristor technology from them when you can get the job done pretty well with the tools we have now? That's what the hardware developers' bosses will say, at least. The developers would love to begin using these in their designs right away, I'm sure.

I'm betting there's a speed problem with these things. How quickly can it change resistance? That would be the limiting factor, and HP doesn't explicitly say they are fast. It says they can make designs smaller and more power efficient. It says it will giver Moore's Law a boost (by which I assume they mean number of transistors (or transistor-equivalents, I guess) in a given area) - but that doesn't necessarily mean increased speed when you're no longer using transistors. Maybe I'm just a pessimist. Anybody got some data on performance, or is it just too early in development to say how these will perform?

Also, what kind of percentage die shrink are we talking about? I'm assuming it would depend on the application (the number of circuits that can be reproduced with memristors instead of transistors). So what would we expect in usage for CPUs? GPUs? non-volatile memory?


RE: Another 3-5 years...?
By drebo on 11/26/2008 5:19:00 PM , Rating: 2
That's not true at all. If nVidia, for example, can save $10/chip by licensing this for $5/chip, then of course they will go for it. Remember, the cost of a chip in raw materials is directly proportional to its size, rather than the complexity of the circuits inside of it. Anything that can make that chip smaller will save money.


Grammar Police...
By UNHchabo on 11/26/2008 11:46:21 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
HP's new integral circuit component allows engineers to produce identical logic circuits using fewer transistors and less space


Fixed.

If you're talking about a plural noun, like "transistors", it's better to say you have fewer of them. Having less of something is for when you're measuring quantity using another unit. This new component takes up less space.

I normally would let it go, but this error was committed in the headline. :)




RE: Grammar Police...
By Spivonious on 11/26/2008 11:50:55 AM , Rating: 2
Actually, the rule is to use "fewer" if you can count the items. "Less" if you cannot.

For example, "He had fewer pencils than she." "He had less courage than she."


RE: Grammar Police...
By UNHchabo on 11/26/2008 12:00:20 PM , Rating: 2
That's basically what I said. What I meant with the "measuring quantity with another unit" was like, how space can be measured in a unit like square feet, or cubic meters, but while you can say "fewer cubic meters", you're talking about having "less space".

I forgot about those pesky things that can't be quantified in any way, like courage. ;)


RE: Grammar Police...
By Alexstarfire on 11/26/2008 4:43:43 PM , Rating: 2
I'm pretty sure we can count the transistors though.


Let me see if I understand...
By Spivonious on 11/26/2008 11:49:39 AM , Rating: 2
So this new thing can be programmed to represent a certain series of transistors? So instead of having one set of transistors for each of 5 cases, I can replace that with one memrister and some software?

If that's true, I can see this completely revolutionizing the computer industry.




RE: Let me see if I understand...
By MozeeToby on 11/26/2008 12:10:16 PM , Rating: 2
That's not quite right. It's more like memristors have theoretically existed for 30 years, and until now we have been kludging together work arounds using transistors because no one knew how to build a memristor.

Now that we can make memristors, we can remove a big chunk of transistors since all they were doing was simulating a single memristor. And when you have thousands of memristors being simulated in the circuit, that can add up fast.


RE: Let me see if I understand...
By Spivonious on 11/26/2008 12:57:32 PM , Rating: 2
So aside from the obvious use of these as nonvolatile memory, what other uses are there? Like how would these help make CPUs better?


RE: Let me see if I understand...
By skaaman on 11/26/2008 3:30:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The new memristor-sporting FPGA design is more compact, more affordable, and uses far less power. In short, it could become the first FPGA to be a viable competitor to dedicated silicon circuits. The potential is impressive; imagine buying AMD or NVIDIA's latest graphics card and receiving regular hardware updates to increase performance and remove errata. As Mr. Williams puts it, "If our ideas work out, this type of FPGA will completely change the balance."


It has the potential to take us from fixed silicon designs to reprogrammable designs. As the article mentions FPGA's are currently too expensive and power hungry to implement in production designs (while great for testing new designs.)

So, hypothetically, lets say AMD's Barcelona processors were able to implement FPGA's with Memristors. The TLB bug could have simply been corrected at the chip level vs a software patch (if I read this correctly...)

Sounds like very promising stuff.


Cache?
By gstrickler on 11/26/2008 3:57:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The new memristor-sporting FPGA design is more compact, more affordable, and uses far less power. In short, it could become the first FPGA to be a viable competitor to dedicated silicon circuits.

If memristors are that fast and are capable of 'remembering' things, then shouldn't they be useful as a replacement for L1/L2/L3 cache? Current cache designs require 6-8 transistors per cell, if a memristor and one or two transistors could replace those, cache capacity could increase and/or chip size could decrease.




RE: Cache?
By Alexstarfire on 11/26/2008 4:45:49 PM , Rating: 2
Could, but probably won't. Unless it's a lot more expensive to make memristors they'll probably leave the size and shape alone and just design the new chip with nothing but memristors.


RE: Cache?
By William Gaatjes on 11/27/2008 2:33:20 PM , Rating: 2
This will be great news for embedded chips designers first.
If the memory on chip can be enlarged significantly or keep the same amount of storage and use the saved die space for special purpose processors like dsp's or gpu's, more advanced devices can be build. And because everything is on chip it is possible to reduce the amount of power used, meaning less recharging for batteries or more mobility. Now flash chips are connected as as seperate entities to embedded cpu's to complement the "small" amount of internal flash. Which also means pcb real estate.

If memristors can be used as cache, who knows it is still new technology. At least memristors based memory should be faster then flash based memory according to the researchers.
If it can be made faster then dram, we may finally have our true instant on, instant off computer. And it needs no refreshing , that also (although small) will contribute to a speed up of memristor memory compared to dram. But we will have to wait and see.


Yay
By SavagePotato on 11/26/2008 12:54:26 PM , Rating: 3
" The potential is impressive; imagine buying AMD or NVIDIA's latest graphics card and receiving regular hardware updates to increase performance and remove errata. "

Imagine giving ATI and Nvidia the ability to release buggy hardware and patch it later. Now they can be just like the game companies.

Or better yet give Nvidia the ability to cripple performance and ransom it to you as an upgrade.

Looking at the glass as being half empty, but with a company as evil as Nvidia has become it's easy to focus on the worst possible potential.




RE: Yay
By geddarkstorm on 11/26/2008 2:51:00 PM , Rating: 2
At the same time, think about the modding community. If this is all possible, and Nvidia did act like that, modders and enthusiasts would figure it out and create their own hardware upgrades to restore function or even be better.


Don't complain about a lack of female readership
By dreddly on 11/27/2008 10:12:21 AM , Rating: 2
That mainpage post that was whining about female readership a while back - take a look at this.

I am all about posting hot girl pics, but don't turn around and pretend you aren't catering to a male-dominated audience when you post stuff like this!




By Mortando on 11/27/2008 1:21:06 PM , Rating: 3
**Thinks about the covers of just about every woman's magazine ever**
wat...?


Repost
By v3rt1g0 on 11/27/2008 6:13:46 AM , Rating: 3
Mick, it'd be a better idea to write about what has changed in the last ~7months, versus writing another article 'announcing' the memristor..

http://www.dailytech.com/HP+Invents+Fabled+Memrist...




HP girl is back
By everxray on 11/26/2008 2:41:10 PM , Rating: 2
I am not even a bit interested in the article




What is Berkley?
By neothe0ne on 11/26/2008 2:57:50 PM , Rating: 2
It wouldn't happen to be a misspelled UC, would it?




Sounds great, but how fast is it?
By s12033722 on 11/26/2008 5:20:30 PM , Rating: 2
That's one key aspect of performance that isn't mentioned here at all. What is the effective read speed and the effective switching speed?

Also, regarding FPGAs - they are too expensive to be used in production only when the production quantities are large. If you design a product that only ships a few thousand units, FPGAs are much cheaper than dedicated ASICs.




Now make it 3 billion times faster
By DOSGuy on 11/27/2008 5:46:17 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Although the HP memristor is a major discovery for electrical engineering theory, it has yet to be demonstrated in operation at practical speeds and densities. Graphs in Williams' original report show switching operation at only ~1 Hz. Although the small dimension of the device seem to imply fast operation, the charge carriers move very slowly, with an ion mobility of 10-10 cm2/(V·s).


From Wikipedia. Although different materials are being explored, and this was only a proof of concept demonstration, it still needs to be anywhere from millions to billions of times faster to be practical in consumer electronics, and the science suggests that this method is inherently slow -- perhaps inherently unsuitable for electronics.




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