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  (Source: thephonecoach.com)
Scientist use household product to fuel sound wave advancement.

Voice calls may be the key to a longer battery life for cell phones.  A group of Korean scientists are now working on a way to power up cell phone batteries with just a little conversation.  

Researchers Young Jun Park and Sang-Woo Kim led the team who discovered how to utilize the prime ingredient in calamine lotion -- zinc oxide --  to develop a nanomaterial that turns sound waves into electricity.

After creating a field of nanowires sandwiched between two electrodes, the group was able to produce a current of 50 millivolts by blasting the field with sound waves of 100db (a normal conversation is 60-70db), according to 
Syberplanet.net.

"Just as speakers transform electric signals into sound, the opposite process — of turning sound into a source of electrical power — is possible. Sound power can be used for various novel applications including mobile phones that can be charged during conversations and sound-insulating walls near highways that generate electricity from the sound of passing vehicles," said Young Jun Park and Sang-Woo Kim.

In addition to the possibility of using this research to help keep phones charged in the future, the technology is also being considered as a means to add power to electrical grids during rush hour.

Young Jun Park and Sang-Woo Kim presented their findings in an article which appears in the 
 Advanced Materials journal.



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I might as well say it...
By MrTeal on 9/14/2010 3:31:42 PM , Rating: 3
Current is not measured in millivolts.

Also: The amount of power this would produce is so small as to be useless.




RE: I might as well say it...
By Iridium130m on 9/14/2010 3:38:26 PM , Rating: 3
not to mention all the power that went into creating 100 decibels of sound is a complete waste.


RE: I might as well say it...
By MozeeToby on 9/14/2010 4:30:45 PM , Rating: 5
It's worth reminding people that the difference between 70 dB and 100 dB isn't 40%, it's actually 800% louder. So, 70 dB might be a loud conversation but 100 dB is what you would hear running a jackhammer. That's more than loud enough to cause permanent hearing damage and they managed to create a whole 50 millivolts out of it.

[sarcasm]Sounds real practical [/sarcasm]


RE: I might as well say it...
By MrTeal on 9/14/2010 5:57:15 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
It's worth reminding people that the difference between 70 dB and 100 dB isn't 40%, it's actually 800% louder.


Loudness is a poor way to look at it, since it's related to how we perceive sound and the ear is highly non-linear. A 100dB pressure wave actually has 1000x (100,000%) the energy of a 70dB pressure wave. If you're getting not enough power to charge a battery at 100dB, you're getting a thousand times less talking into it.


RE: I might as well say it...
By MozeeToby on 9/15/2010 12:45:37 PM , Rating: 2
Doh! You're right of course, for some reason I was thinking that every 10 decibels was a 2x increase. As you point out, the situation is even worse than my original post makes it seem.


RE: I might as well say it...
By XZerg on 9/14/2010 3:40:49 PM , Rating: 2
Also add to the point that this continuous re-charging of the battery would kill it pretty damn quickly too.


RE: I might as well say it...
By MozeeToby on 9/14/2010 4:22:11 PM , Rating: 2
Low voltage trickle charging won't kill your battery, even if the battery is full the level of power they're talking about won't do any damage. Especially considering that even under ideal circumstances this system would never generate more power than the phone is using, even in standby. It's rapid charging/discharging (actually the high heat levels that come with it) that doom batteries after a couple years of use.

There's a multitude of issues in the way of commercializing this technology, killing batteries isn't one of them.


RE: I might as well say it...
By MrTeal on 9/14/2010 5:48:31 PM , Rating: 2
Actually, lithium batteries like the ones in cell phones cannot support an over-charge, and should NOT be trickle charged. You'll plate the lithium. Not every battery is the same.


RE: I might as well say it...
By goku on 9/14/2010 9:50:30 PM , Rating: 2
his point still stands... it's not that the batteries are going to get overcharged just when you make a call, it isn't a conversation but instead it's a monologue.. Though it would be interesting if you could charge the phone via this method just by keeping it around and overtime, it will eventually get fully charged. This device would probably go through some charging circuitry if it were to ever accomplish the idea I just projected.


Think of the benefits!
By torpor on 9/14/2010 3:30:29 PM , Rating: 5
If they paint the walls of the Oval Office and Congress with this stuff, the feds could actually do something helpful and productive for a change.




RE: Think of the benefits!
By Smartless on 9/14/2010 3:41:15 PM , Rating: 2
Hell attach it to the stupid modded mopeds they have all around Hawaii or commuter jets to power the AC but a phone? ah come on. If anyone talks louder than 70 decibels they could harness the energy from my slaps to the back of their heads.


RE: Think of the benefits!
By RivuxGamma on 9/14/2010 8:26:44 PM , Rating: 2
F yeah! Also, people from New Jersey are now a power source, thusly becoming not entirely useless to the rest of the U.S.


sound powered phones
By jnemesh on 9/14/2010 5:36:24 PM , Rating: 2
On my maiden voyage aboard the USS Mahan, I was sent scurrying around the ship to find batteries for the sound powered phones. It took me 2 hours to figure that one out! :) Seriously though, the Navy has been using sound powered phone systems (shipboard closed circuit communication) for YEARS. Getting electricity from your voice is nothing new, and if it were practical to charge devices, we would have seen it long ago. 2 points for an interesting study...let me know when we have anything USEFUL from it!




RE: sound powered phones
By Spookster on 9/14/2010 7:18:58 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah those batteries are model# 1D10T. They are usually stored near the aft of the ship in the basement under the foc'sle. :)


RE: sound powered phones
By priusone on 9/14/2010 11:51:08 PM , Rating: 2
Near the grid squares or keys for the HMMPWV's?


RE: sound powered phones
By Spookster on 9/15/2010 4:06:41 PM , Rating: 2
Or just ask the first Chief Petty Office you see where to find them but you will want to use the proper nomenclature for the batteries which is PRC-E7. So just tell the Chief you are looking for a PRC-E7.


transducer
By cfaalm on 9/14/2010 5:37:25 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just as speakers transform electric signals into sound, the opposite process — of turning sound into a source of electrical power — is possible.


Yes, it is called a microphone. So this is microphone technology used to charge a battery. This should help in wireless microphones too.




RE: transducer
By Schrag4 on 9/15/2010 1:11:01 PM , Rating: 2
That was my first thought too. Welcome to the 19th century.

Next you'll be telling me that just like electric motors can turn something, you could capture a turning motion to "generate" electricity. That would be the day! </sarcasm>


Factoid
By rstove02 on 9/14/2010 4:45:29 PM , Rating: 3
Remember hearing a science factoid stating that a person would have to yell for 11 years to generate enough power to heat a cup of coffee in a microwave.

True a cell phone uses a fraction of power a microwave, but a fraction of 11 years is would still be fairly significant time window.




Android
By SunAngel on 9/15/2010 12:17:33 AM , Rating: 2
Being an iPhone fanboy I could yell at an Android smartphone, "You clown (clone)!" and it would get soo riled up as a give itself a boost of energy? I assume it works the other way around too? But, what could Androidians say about the iPhone to give it a kick in the pants?




By AdrianMiller on 9/15/2010 6:26:03 AM , Rating: 2
We've set the original research article behind this story free to access for the next few weeks; you can find it here: http://www.materialsviews.com/details/news/843529/...

Adrian Miller
Advanced Materials




Lost all credibility
By repatch on 9/15/2010 3:42:13 PM , Rating: 2
here: "the group was able to produce a current of 50 millivolts"

Umm, current is not measured in millivolts.

That aside, "50 millivolts" tells me nothing, walking across a carpet produces a voltage in the thousands of volts.

What's important is POWER, that's measured in watts by the way.

Let me know when you get that figure...




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