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Print 12 comment(s) - last by maverick85wd.. on Sep 10 at 12:33 AM


  (Source: CellPhoneSignal)
First HSPA+ device is apt successor to G1

It was almost two years ago when T-Mobile quietly unveiled the first Android phone in the U.S., the G1. The design of the device was a bit cumbersome, and Android 1.0 was buggy, to say the least. However, the G1 was one of the first handsets that supported T-Mobile's burgeoning 3G network and introduced Google's new OS. After weeks of speculation, T-Mobile officially announced the G1's follow-up, aptly called the G2, this morning.

As you may know, the G2 is the first device designed specifically for T-Mobile's "4G-like" HSPA+ network. There has been much debate about the accuracy of T-Mobile's 4G label, because HSPA+ is more akin to 3.5G, rather than true 4G technology like Verizon's LTE and Sprint's WiMax

T-Mobile ignited the spark that set the Android world ablaze two years ago with the launch of the world’s first Android-powered mobile phone, the T-Mobile G1, which remains an important milestone for both T-Mobile and the Android operating system,” said T-Mobile Chief Technology Officer Cole Brodman in a press release. “Now, with the launch of the T-Mobile G2, we are re-teaming with our partners at Google and HTC to provide T-Mobile customers with another first — the first Android smartphone designed to deliver 4G speeds on our new network.”

The G2 will sport Android 2.2 out of the box and is "tightly integrated with Google" services like Google Voice, Google Goggles, and Voice Actions. It will not run Sense UI, or any other proprietary skin for that matter, so Android updates should come to the device quickly.

The G2 features a 3.7" AMOLED screen, sliding QWERTY keyboard, 5MP camera with flash, 720p video, 4GB of internal memory with an 8GB micro-SD card pre-installed (support for up to 32GB), and "Dedicated Quick Keys for one-touch access to your favorite Google shortcuts and applications."

As we pointed out last week, a major drawback to the G2 is its 800 MHz MSM7x30 processor, which doesn't have a chance against the more powerful Samsung 1 GHz Hummingbird, or even the 1 GHz Snapdragon that powers the EVO 4G.

T-Mobile has not announced a specific release date, but has launched an official page for the device, which promises: "Current T-Mobile customers will get exclusive access to pre-order the G2 starting later this month.

So there you have it. As usual, the nation's fourth-largest carrier is seemingly playing catch-up with the competition. The HSPA+ capability of the G2 is nice if you are in one of the 55 major metropolitan areas that carries it. But the device is hard-pressed to hold its own against other full-QWERTY Android devices like Sprint's Epic 4G, or the Droid 2 from Verizon.



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Uh...
By quiksilvr on 9/9/2010 9:22:35 AM , Rating: 5
They did 800 MHz for a few reasons:
1) Saves money
2) Saves battery life
3) No need

There is no need for 1 GHz of epic speed of epicness. Why? The damn iPhone 4 runs on an 800MHz processor. It's not just the speed, its how you use it. What's the use of being 10 inches long if it curves to the right and I can't get all the way in? Gimme a straight 8 and she'll be happier.




RE: Uh...
By Connoisseur on 9/9/2010 10:30:00 AM , Rating: 2
Agreed. Those "awesome 1ghz" smart phones have horrid battery life compared to the competition. In addition, the bottleneck isn't at the phone end.. it's on the networks that run these phones. 3G is getting pretty long in the tooth, especially for the services that are available today. If the G2 can provide competitive battery life while also allowing for higher bandwidth, it should be a hit. After all, the average consumer doesn't care if a phone has a 1GHZ core or a 500mhz core. All they want to know is:
1) Can I get fast internet?
2) Can it run all the apps I want?
3) Can it stream video?
4) Can it last a long time?
5) Does it look good?

Not necessarily in that order...


RE: Uh...
By bplewis24 on 9/9/2010 12:14:34 PM , Rating: 2
The Droid X has horrid battery life?


RE: Uh...
By leexgx on 9/9/2010 10:20:09 PM , Rating: 2
my G1 phone was horrid if i had 3g enabled not much better on 2g (basic like an Iphone)

but lasted 2-3 days with an 2200mHa bat with 3g enabled (default one was 1100mHa i think)

if they used an Dual core slower CPU the phone should be quite fluid (on the HTC desire i have now far better then the G1 thought that one is stuck on 1.6 for the time)

smartphone companys should fit bigger bats to match its intended use


RE: Uh...
By Mojo the Monkey on 9/9/2010 10:22:59 PM , Rating: 2
If I recall correctly, the MSM7x30 architecture is a step ahead of Snapdragon. The GPU should also be near (but just less than) Hummingbird, which means it should also smash snapdragon in that regard. Why no mention that the 800mhz number should be considered with a grain of salt?

I cant imagine a tech site would make these numbers claims when referring to a P4 vs. Corei7, etc.


RE: Uh...
By drewidgho5t on 9/9/2010 6:36:53 PM , Rating: 2
So she enjoys watching you get phukkd??!?!!

[Most wives probly do enjoy watchin their man get phukkt once in a while] !!

With that said: 1. I do apologize, but when the pins are set that straight someones gotta throw the bowlin ball.

2. On the possibility you are a sys admin/special ops instructor with the ability to find my ip number and hurt me 1000 diff ways ==I AM SO SORRY.

3. I agree with your sentiments concerning the 800mhz. Which brings the next question...

I do realize that ARM is a fabless chip design house from England and snapdragon is (I believe Qualcomm???) based on ARM. The other major chip in phones is TI who also licenses ARM. (blah bllah blah just so you know that I know)

IS THAT 800MHZ MSM7x30 AN ARM CHIP?? Because an 800mhz ARM I'll take over a 1.2Mhz not based on ARM anyday. Indeed I would prefer a TI/ARM over a (Qualcomm??)/ARM or any other ***/ARM.

To anyone who can answer that last question, THANKYOU.
To quiksilvr, thanx for NOT hurting/killing me.


RE: Uh...
By maverick85wd on 9/10/2010 12:33:32 AM , Rating: 2
seriously guys, I haven't seen a 6 in a while, but this comment deserves one.


4G
By sprockkets on 9/9/2010 9:44:45 AM , Rating: 2
That's the problem with Sprint calling their WiMAX 4G. It isn't 4G YET. To reach 4G standards data speeds need to be 100mbps while MOVING and 1 gbit while stationary. It currently is a PRE-4G network.

T-Mobile then claims 4G like speeds because Sprint is claiming they have 4G when they don't, YET.




RE: 4G
By AnotherGuy on 9/9/2010 11:37:57 AM , Rating: 2
All i want to know is when is MyTouch 3G getting Froyo... damnit


oh and
By sprockkets on 9/9/2010 1:52:42 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
But the device is hard-pressed to hold its own against other full-QWERTY Android devices like Sprint's Epic 4G, or the Droid 2 from Verizon.


You do know T-Mobile already has the Samsung Galaxy s, aka the Epic 4G right? And I'm willing to bet it can download just as fast or even faster without taking as much battery either.




RE: oh and
By Mojo the Monkey on 9/9/2010 10:20:38 PM , Rating: 2
I think he was comparing it to qwerty phones... which the galaxy S on T-mo is not.


more
By sprockkets on 9/9/2010 12:18:18 PM , Rating: 2
Just a few more points: There are plenty of HSDPA+ phones out there; they didn't just get that tech this year.

quote:
The HSPA+ capability of the G2 is nice if you are in one of the 55 major metropolitan areas that carries it.


They offer it right here where I live in FL. Sprint OTOH, has 4G in 1 city in FL. Guess who wins? And the upgrade to + isn't major at all.




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