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  (Source: Game Spot)
The launch of Super Mario Galaxy 2 causes only a minor frenzy for diehard fans

Nintendo continues to hit great strides. The popular Wii gets motion plus and was just released in black, a new 3D version of the DS underway, and the DS is poised to break records as the world's best-selling video game console.

Now the launch of
Super Mario Galaxy 2 promises to be a continuation of the standard that fans expect from Nintendo and enjoyed with the break-out hit Super Mario Galaxy. Galaxy 2 is more of the same -- with new powers for Mario, Yoshi and a collection of levels that reach for the stars -- in 3D and 2D as well.

While the launch of
Super Mario Galaxy was delivered with a bang, Super Mario Galaxy 2 is arriving quietly, but not without its own minor frenzy. Some fans chose to wait in line for more than 50 hours to buy the game at the Nintendo World Store in New York City.

"I wait in line because it shows dedication to the company," said fan William Francis. “I don't stay in line for Xbox 360 games."

The game received a 97 percent rating from the website
Game Rankings and is getting positive reviews for changes that provide creative advancements while remaining true to the original game. GameSpot gave the game a perfect 10. This is only the seventh time ever that GameSpot has doled out such an honor, and the first time a Wii game has earned a perfect mark. 

While overall, the game is being hailed for being a better version of
Super Mario Galaxy, the game is getting a few complaints. Some reviews criticize that Galaxy 2 is too much like the original and that as the levels increase, the challenges become too difficult and may frustrate players.

With the focus on heightened difficulty during game play, it appears that Nintendo is trying to "up the ante" overall. Nintendo creator Shigeru Miyamoto said that he is worried that Nintendo games have been appealing to "too small" an audience. Miyamoto said that there is a tendency for games like Mario that can be played by children to become childish.

"Those making the game tend to unconsciously make them that way," Miyamoto said. The line "Where'd my mommy go?" was proposed for a Nintendo game said Miyamoto.  "When someone in their fifties like me hears their player-character speak childishly like that, it doesn't quite sit right," Miyamoto added. "After all, Mario wasn't a game only for children in the first place. As I make a game, I try to keep in mind that guys in their fifties will play it, too."





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