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The study found that 52 percent of children ages 5 to 8 years old have had access to a mobile device while 39 percent of 2 to 4-year-olds and 10 percent of zero to 1-year-olds have had access

For years, media such as television and video game systems have been used as babysitters for younger children. But as technology advances and more gadgets are introduced, mobile devices like smartphones and tablets are being used for the same purposes.

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit group that focuses on the use of technology by children, prepared a study called "Zero to Eight: Children's Media Use in America." As the study suggests, it describes the amount of media children ages zero to eight consume via mobile devices and television.

The study looked at 1,384 parents with children up to 8 years old from May 27, 2011 to June 15, 2011.

Let’s start with television. According to the study, nine-month-olds spend almost an hour per day watching television or DVDs. Children under the age of two spend twice as much time watching TV and videos as they do reading books at 53 minutes and 23 minutes per day respectively. In addition, 30 percent of zero to 1-year-olds have a TV in their bedroom while 44 percent of 2 to 4-year-olds and 47 percent of 5 to 8-year-olds have a TV in their bedrooms as well.

As far as computers go, 53 percent of all 2 to 4-year-olds have used a computer and 90 percent of all 5 to 8-year-olds have used a computer. The average age of first use was around 3 and a half.

The newest group of gadgets to be introduced to youngsters is mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. According to the study, 29 percent of parents have downloaded apps specifically for their children on their phones. On average, 11 percent of the children used a cell phone or other mobile device for media consumption for about 43 minutes per day.

When it comes to both computers and mobile devices, the study notes that there is a "digital divide" among those in different income brackets. In the computer realm, 72 percent of children up to age 8 have a computer in their home. Among low-income families (less than $30,000 per year), this number is at about 48 percent where higher-income families (over $75,000 per year) are at 91 percent.

In addition to the digital divide is the "app gap," where 27 percent of lower-income families include a parent with a smartphone where 57 percent of higher-income families include a parent with a smartphone. Thirty-eight percent of lower-income parents don't even know what an app is where only 3 percent of higher-income parents are unaware.

Overall, the study found that 52 percent of children ages 5 to 8 years old have had access to a mobile device while 39 percent of 2 to 4-year-olds and 10 percent of zero to 1-year-olds have had access.

The study can be found here.

Source: MSNBC



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Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 11:58:16 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
In addition, 30 percent of zero to 1-year-olds have a TV in their bedroom


Are you serious what child under 1 needs a television in their room let alone 30%. I find this absolutely ridiculous.




RE: Wait what?
By AlvinCool on 10/28/2011 12:09:49 PM , Rating: 2
There are schools of thought that playing certain multimedia for your child from birth can boost their IQ and/or start their brain development earlier in life. I don't know if it works but it seems to be a trend. Try a search for baby Einstein.

Regardless a pad would allow you to play songs and certain visual media that would be soothing to a baby. Lets face it they hang all kinds of crap that makes noises and stimulates hand eye coordination, why is a tablet to stimulate learning so odd.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 12:12:05 PM , Rating: 2
The tablet learning is not odd to me I understand that. The tv is the bedroom does not make sense to me.

I have heard of the baby Einstein stuff but I thought that was all music and sounds not visual things.


RE: Wait what?
By Solandri on 10/28/2011 1:47:11 PM , Rating: 3
It was disavowed recently by the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics). Kids can't comprehend what they're seeing on TV until they're about 2 years old.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/10/infant-t...

The jury on tablets is still out. They can be interactive rather than purely passive, so may help. We just haven't had enough time for studies on it.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 2:10:29 PM , Rating: 2
Ok that is what I thought.


RE: Wait what?
By kleinma on 10/28/2011 12:22:29 PM , Rating: 2
Yes look up baby einstein and see all the articles about how studies show it does nothing but give kids ADD just like all other TV young kids watch, and does nothing to actually make kids smarter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_Einstein#Controv...


RE: Wait what?
By bh192012 on 10/31/2011 2:30:39 PM , Rating: 2
Except what all these studies leave out is that cause does not equal effect here. If you are cleaning the house and you have a baby looking at the ceiling, they're not learning either. We end up comparing kids who have grandma helping v.s. kids who don't have her helping.

My kids watched stuff like that and they are the top studets at their grade level. They have excellent vocabularies and test 2 grade levels above their classmates in reading/writing. It's not because they watched that stuff, it also didn't hurt them.

What does hurt kids is ploping them down in front of the television INSTEAD of spending time with them. It should not be a substitute for human contact.


RE: Wait what?
By AnnihilatorX on 10/30/2011 7:04:20 AM , Rating: 2
According to Ars Technica kids are watching too much TV; if they're under two, any TV is too much

http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/10/kids-a...


RE: Wait what?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:15:28 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, it seems very odd to me. In fact, it seems completely ludicrous.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 12:20:36 PM , Rating: 2
I honestly don't see any reason a kid needs a tv in his/er room EVER. I think it makes more sense to have a playroom and have a tv in there so they can choose to play or watch a movie or both. But a tv in the bedroom to me is a big NO


RE: Wait what?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:23:21 PM , Rating: 3
I know I'll get rated down by the parents on these boards, but I also don't see the need for those TV screens mounted in the ceilings/headrests of SUVs/minivans.

Parents think they can just slap some headphones on their kids, pop in a DVD, and let the kids zone the **** out so they can get some "peace".


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 12:27:00 PM , Rating: 2
I can see some benefit to that. My family when I was younger drove down to Florida every year from Maryland. I think a tv like that to have more options to keep your kid entertained on really long car trips is a good idea. But not pop in Spongebob for the 30 min ride to the store.


RE: Wait what?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:36:21 PM , Rating: 2
Hey, I'm a "get off my lawn" kinda guy ;)

In my day, I read books and played with Transformers or Technic Legos in the car on long trips:)


RE: Wait what?
By Mitch101 on 10/28/2011 12:58:43 PM , Rating: 2
What Transformers and legos are choking hazzards why a lego could break off during a bump and decapitate you today. Kidding on the hysteria of helicopter bubble wrapped parents of today.

I and one of my kids cant read in the car. The motion causes us to feel ill. We do try to get them to color, draw, and play with clay, still a little young for MadLibs. Keep in mind seat belts were optional growing up. The days of wrestling with your brother in the back seat and facing the people behind you making faces are gone with seat belt laws and common sense in protecting our kids. But things are different than the days of playing Punch Buggy and having 255 Air Conditioning.

On long drives we do purchase new games for the kids Nintendo DS (Depending on grades is whether they get 1-2 games for the ride) and the games allow them to play together over wireless. I have two movie tablets which I try to load up with their favorite TV programs and few movies to keep them entertained. Were starting to let them text with their friends its pseudo writing skills and communicating with others is important or we just tell ourselves it is to justify it. Our cars are just mobile entertainment centers.

But I understand your attachment to how as kids you stared out the window waiting for the next Pedro Says and dreamed dad stopping at Stuckeys for fireworks. Its just a different generation.

I will say we try to force our kids outside. A bit before gaming took over there was whiffle ball, frisbee, and tag football if you were hurt playing tackle.

Im dreading the days of your not going out wearing that to my daughters. For now I can only instill fear about them growing up.


RE: Wait what?
By ClownPuncher on 10/28/2011 1:05:54 PM , Rating: 2
I know, we had lawn darts and machetes to play with when I was young. Most of us lived, and lived to be successful


RE: Wait what?
By jimbojimbo on 10/28/2011 3:15:40 PM , Rating: 2
It's strange how most people wear helmets when riding a bicycle these days when absolutely nobody wore one back in the 80s! Oh, the good old days setting up ramps on the top of staircases so we can fly longer... I don't think this happens any more.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 3:17:06 PM , Rating: 2
It's cause parents remember their bruises and don't want them on their kids.


RE: Wait what?
By ClownPuncher on 10/28/2011 6:17:40 PM , Rating: 2
Bruises make you smart. Unless they are on your brain.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 6:30:02 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly


RE: Wait what?
By gmyx on 10/28/2011 2:20:46 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
On long drives we do purchase new games for the kids Nintendo DS (Depending on grades is whether they get 1-2 games for the ride) and the games allow them to play together over wireless. I have two movie tablets which I try to load up with their favorite TV programs and few movies to keep them entertained.

Seems like really long drives but we never bring these along. You don't really need these instant gratification devices all the time.

quote:
But I understand your attachment to how as kids you stared out the window waiting for the next Pedro Says and dreamed dad stopping at Stuckeys for fireworks. Its just a different generation.
Because we let it be that way instead of making them see all there is including technology.

quote:
I will say we try to force our kids outside. A bit before gaming took over there was whiffle ball, frisbee, and tag football if you were hurt playing tackle. Im dreading the days of your not going out wearing that to my daughters. For now I can only instill fear about them growing up.

That is simple - turn off the damn devices!

The problem with these devices is we are allowing our kids to sit around all day. What I've read in the article it seems some "parents" start this habit from day 1. My 6 year old is only allowed a total of 60 minutes of TV a day. After that the TV is off. In summer he usually goes outside because there is more to do out there. He loves my smartphone (Angry Brids and Driving Games) but he knows it's always a short term device. He will spent much more time with Legos than anything else. This is because we habituated him to that. He didn't see a TV program until he was 2 - and didn't care for them until he was 4.


RE: Wait what?
By Mitch101 on 10/28/2011 2:45:33 PM , Rating: 2
I don't see it as a problem. Stare mindlessly into space or try to spark their brains solving problems.

Most of the games they play are collaborative. Im in the process of setting up a Minecraft server for the kids in our community that do this. Its interesting the imagination they have in a virtual space. I wouldnt say its mindless its creation and imagination. Possibly some building block to engineering.

I like that they have determination to finish things through to the end or work together with their friends to accomplish a task. Neither of my kids are overweight my wife tells me our one daughter practically has abs and the other is a whiz on

I dont believe in hard regime of 60 minutes of television its not the military. Even kids need to unwind and accomplish nothing.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 2:49:58 PM , Rating: 2
For me it depends on the technology and the time of day. If it is something that stimulates their mind then they can do it on rainy days, night, or when friends are sick. But television is different I see that as an night time activity for a limited amount of time. Not 60 min on the dot but also not all night

The Minecraft idea is really cool that you are doing that


RE: Wait what?
By ChronoReverse on 10/28/2011 1:30:21 PM , Rating: 2
I learned to concentrate and amuse myself without needing the aid of "things" because I got nothing while in the car (and I had to ride 20 minutes to school every day in elementary).

<get off my lawn mode>Kids are so spoiled these days</get off my lawn mode>


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 1:58:06 PM , Rating: 2
Trust me I feel the same way. I can just see the benefit of it being used. I too used to play with action figures and had my old school Gameboy to play. I know my car will never have a tv in it. There will be a max of two tvs in my house one for the family room and one for the playroom none shall be in any bedroom


RE: Wait what?
By theapparition on 10/31/2011 11:52:32 AM , Rating: 2
In my day, seatbelts weren't mandatory, and neither were carseats. I played many of time in the footwell while the parents were driving, obviously no seat-belt and certainly no car seat.

I doubt you'd do the same with your children. You are going to try to make them as safe as possible.

Technology is no different. We didn't do that when we were young because we didn't have that stuff. Just because we didn't have it, doesn't mean there is need to deprive our children.

This mindset that "they don't need it" is ridiculous. the only thing anyone needs is air, food, water, shelter. You don't need a computer, or a smartphone. Your parents lived without them, so you don't need one either, right?

Studies have shown that the sooner you get technology into childrens hands, the quicker they are to adapt to it. Some are legitimate learning toys, some are nothing but time wasters. You have to sort the wheat from the chaff and find the ones that work for your family. But to dismiss them all is backward minded thinking.

I remember a LONG time ago, before I had kids, a woman co-worker was disgussing a controversial pop star her daughter was listening too. I chimed in that there was no way I was going to let my kids listen to that stuff. At which she asked me how old my kids were. I replied I didn't have any kids. She laughed and told me I had no idea what I was talking about. And years later, she was absolutely right. I had no idea.

So, come back when you have kids and you'll see that your entire pre-conceived notion of childcare is out the window. Trust me.


RE: Wait what?
By nafhan on 10/28/2011 12:50:46 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe it's the perceived attitude you have a problem with? Because, I'm not really understanding your hate for in car entertainment. Honestly, who actually needs a TV at all? Kids spending to much time staring at a TV screen is the problem, not where they're sitting while they do it.

Note: I may be a bad example as I didn't think the cost of built in TV was worth it. We just have a portable DVD player that we bring on longer trips.


RE: Wait what?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:58:04 PM , Rating: 2
It's probably just the perceived attitude. I guess it just fits my idea of how parents are offloading actual parenting onto technology devices.

Kids get put in front of a TV to zone out at home, then in the car, they're given even more time to zone out in front of the TV.


RE: Wait what?
By Hardin on 10/28/2011 12:56:52 PM , Rating: 2
Oh no Brandon, I'm 23 and I am so glad that cars have this. I would be bored to tears on long trips without it. Not all of us can read in the car, I get very sick if I do that.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 2:14:12 PM , Rating: 2
I'm 22 and I think a TV in the car is stupid. Hell kids have a gameboy they can play, or they can bring action figures. Maybe kids should learn to be creative and use their imagination like our parents used to do.


RE: Wait what?
By MrBlastman on 10/28/2011 2:22:34 PM , Rating: 2
I'm a parent and I won't rate you down. My kid will have NO television in her bedroom... EVER if I can help it and she won't have a television in the car, either. My house is strange though, my Wife and I don't even have a television in our own bedroom. We're an oddity--a one television household.

My daughter, when riding in the car, will get to experience the joys of watching in high-definition, full surround-sound audio the whole car ride... through her eyeballs, while looking OUT THE WINDOW. ;) If she wants something interactive, I _will_ allow her to read books or play a handheld game device (when she gets older)--far better than staring at a stupid screen the whole trip drooling all over her shirt.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 2:29:37 PM , Rating: 2
Totally agree and that is what I plan on doing when I have kids later in life


It called parenting
By Dr of crap on 10/28/2011 12:48:15 PM , Rating: 2
And for the vast majority of so called parents - they don't know how to.

What happened to spanking - OH NO, that's taken away. It's to hurtful and the parents could be punished for disiplining their kid. So now we have "time outs".
Let me tell you from my experiences since my wife does daycare. Time outs are a waste of time and energy. Smacking the kid like we were and we did for our kids works everytime.

But todays parents will let give kid whatever keeps them occupied as that they do not have to be involved with their kids and deal with their whinning. GIVING IN TO WHINNING KIDS ONLY MAKES THEM WHINE MORE. Yet that statement is lost to almost every parent today.

NO kid under 12 needs a cell phone or a TV in his room.

DO your parenting right!




RE: It called parenting
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:53:48 PM , Rating: 2
When I was in elementary school during the 80s, the teachers had wooden paddles that they would use on us if we acted up. Hell, parents ENCOURAGED it.

If you did some REALLY stupid, you got sent to the principal's office -- he had a paddle that was twice the size and had holes in it. You didn't want that.

Looking back, I don't believe we had many behavior problems because kids knew that they would get jacked up if they stepped out of line. Nowadays, kids just go buck wild. It's everyone else fault but the student.

My wife is a teacher, and this image is so apt for today's parents:

http://img98.imageshack.us/img98/6673/309776101505...


RE: It called parenting
By Dr of crap on 10/28/2011 1:03:55 PM , Rating: 2
Glad I have others that have the same view.
And that picture hits it right on the mark.

It's never the kids fault, it's the teacher and school!

Yet if they'd investigate the home life, with millioins of Fedreal grant money of course, they'd find out the real problem our kids can't compete with other countries. We're to soft on the kids.


RE: It called parenting
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 1:55:25 PM , Rating: 2
I agree with both of you now I went to elementary school in the 90s so my experience was not like your Brandon but the area I grew up in almost everyone used either their hand or a switch for spanking. I had friends that had to cut their switches luckily I just had a hand used for me. I think the idea of corporal punishment for a kid is the perfect tool for training them. Even as teens brain dusters should be ENCOURAGED.


RE: It called parenting
By siberus on 10/30/2011 6:35:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
When I was in elementary school during the 80s, the teachers had wooden paddles that they would use on us if we acted up. Hell, parents ENCOURAGED it.


Paddles were already banned when i was in elementary, but my dad STILL encouraged it...


RE: It called parenting
By anactoraaron on 10/28/2011 2:54:34 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Let me tell you from my experiences since my wife does daycare. Time outs are a waste of time and energy. Smacking the kid like we were and we did for our kids works everytime.

Don't take this the wrong way, but stay the hell away from my kids.

Sure time-out's are a waste of time and energy if you don't follow the correct process for giving a kid a time out - but hey, it's just so much easier to just smack your kid. I have a 3 year old and have exclusively used time-outs. And I do them properly and they work. Why wouldn't I just hit her? Hmmm. I love her, that's why.

Here's something else to consider before smacking your kids- young kids, say younger than age 5, don't fully understand certain concepts like what it is you are even trying to accomplish by hitting them. All they see is that if someone isn't doing what you want them to do then it's okay to hit them to get them to do what you want. Guess who taught them that?

Kids are smart, but their understanding of certain concepts isn't fully developed like yours is. Kids will see things in their simplest form. So again if you do the time-out properly and consistently, they will see if they misbehave then a punishment will come, and then they have to apologize for what they have done. Hitting usually doesn't end with the child apologizing and they likely won't even understand they have done anything wrong- they just know if they do X then you will hit them for it.

It's like no one here has ever seen an episode of "Super Nanny". I have seen some hellish kids get Consistent Dicipline through time-outs and become well behaved kids. You just need to be a good parent and even more importantly be consistent .


RE: It called parenting
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 2:59:04 PM , Rating: 2
The problem is that works with some kids and some it doesn't. Also get off this whole "hitting" your kid. I was spanked ever since I remember. You don't simple just hit the kid. You first explain that he/she did something wrong, and then explain that they have to be punished for what they do. If you do it that way they make the same connection to doing bad equals punishment and punishment equals spanking. Just like any punishment it all depends in how the parent does it. Spanking vs timeout can both be ineffective or effective depending on how the parent does it.

quote:
Why wouldn't I just hit her? Hmmm. I love her, that's why.


So your saying my parents didn't love me that's a bs reason to not spank your child.


RE: It called parenting
By hankw on 10/28/2011 3:17:02 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
So your saying my parents didn't love me that's a bs reason to not spank your child.


I disagree. To me spanking is just lazy parenting. It really only serves as a way to release your aggression and deal quick punishment. There are so many other ways you can punish your child and they would get the same impact.


RE: It called parenting
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 3:18:55 PM , Rating: 3
Again it all depends in how you do. If you just go and spank your kid right there then yes that's bad. My parents would have 30 min to an hour long talk with me before hand. I knew exactly what I did wrong got my spanking and didn't do that thing again. But if you do just get angry and smack the kid that is completely the wrong way to deal with it.


RE: It called parenting
By vortmax2 on 10/28/2011 4:35:08 PM , Rating: 3
Exactly, it's all about the heart behind the discipline. Kids may not understand many things fully, but they certainly understand the difference between love and 'non-love' and have an uncanny way of sensing it in their parents.

Most kids respond quite well to responsible spanking and usually require less and less as time goes on. That's because they learn that obeying their authority (parents in this case) is the right thing and choose to do it more and more often. This is a basic priciple they learn and bring into adulthood.

I've RARELY seen timeouts work properly...probably for many reasons (including lack of consistency). I've also seen where spanking in anger causes more problems than it solves.

Of course it's worth to mention that, depending on the child, their response to different techniques can vary and parents need to adjust accordingly.

In the end, however, it's all about the heart behind the discipline.


RE: It called parenting
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 4:40:13 PM , Rating: 2
+6


RE: It called parenting
By Parhel on 10/29/2011 1:31:29 AM , Rating: 2
That's well said, and really mirrors my experiences with discipline as a parent.

With two boys under 5, discipline is part of our life every day. We've only spanked our two children maybe five times combined, but it's really effective for those behaviors that have to stop immediately, like safety issues.

For example, my two year old was biting people. He's not mean usually. I think he just thought it was funny or something, I don't know. But this went on for weeks, and he had been yelled at, gotten time outs, lost privileges, etc. . . . everything we could think of.

One day, he bit his older brother so hard he drew blood and left a nasty bruise with bite marks for a week afterwards. He was spanked, just a few times on the butt with an open hand. We explained why he was being disciplined both before and after the punishment. He never bit anyone once after that.

We've decided not to spank going forward, though. Our older son is autistic, and is just too sensitive physically. We felt that our younger son would get a complex if he got spanked and our older boy didn't.


RE: It called parenting
By anactoraaron on 10/28/2011 4:31:05 PM , Rating: 2
That's not exactly what I was trying to say. Really to get what I was trying to say you should ask your parents how it felt to abuse you. I mean, how do you feel after spanking your child? Is love a part of that equation? It's called abuse for a reason. You don't spank to just give em a tap. You hit until they cry (when it hurts) to TEACH THEM A LESSON. AKA Abuse. I know, I was spanked as a kid. Sometimes with a hand, sometimes a belt- and that metal buckle hurt like hell- and some kids are hit with worse.

As for kids being "soft", life is always a fragile thing. If you have a problem with kids having a lack of respect and particularly a lack of respect for authority figures I would say that was a learned behavior from those kids' parents. Either the parents taught them from their lack of discipline and consistent discipline or from their own behavior.

If time-outs should never work for my kids, I would seek help from a professional in which ever field they would be in to help control bad behavior by providing me with another alternative form of discipline. I will never spank, because from my own experience it doesn't stop with using just your hand. It always escalates (extension cord, belt, etc).


RE: It called parenting
By Parhel on 10/29/2011 1:11:06 AM , Rating: 2
What the hell are you on about? People here are talking about spanking, i.e. two or three smacks on the butt with an open hand, and you're talking about belts and extension cords?!?!??! WTF??

I've honestly never even heard of that. If your parents beat you with an freaking extension cord, then maybe you should refrain from giving others parenting advice until after you seek professional counseling. You're way off base, here.

Here's your line of reasoning, right back at you:

Time-outs are abuse. You lock them away to TEACH THEM A LESSON, AKA abuse. They always escalate into waterboarding and locking your children in cages for days on end without food or water. You're a monster for putting your children in time-out.


RE: It called parenting
By anactoraaron on 10/30/2011 2:35:38 AM , Rating: 2
I'm way off base? You're off the deep end. I said "you hit until it hurts enough to make your child cry" and that was abuse. Kids don't always cry when on a time out. I have heard stories of kids being hit with extension cords and if you haven't then you haven't asked enough people.

Locking your kids up without food or water?? WTF? Where the hell do you get that from??

Since when has corporal punishment been done responsibly? By it's very nature it is not. Way to jump off the deep end there bud. Equating time outs to torture. Good one.


RE: It called parenting
By Parhel on 10/30/2011 5:54:05 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I'm way off base? You're off the deep end.


Yes, you're way off base. You have three posts on Dailytech, meaning you registered only to weigh in on this topic. You have no credibility. On any Internet forum, when spanking is brought up, people like you seem to crawl out of the woodwork to equate spanking as discipline with child abuse.

quote:
Locking your kids up without food or water?? WTF? Where the hell do you get that from??


And I ask you, where the hell do you get off comparing spanking to hitting a child with a metal belt buckle?

quote:
Since when has corporal punishment been done responsibly? By it's very nature it is not.


By it's very nature??? That's sounds like a dogmatic assertion without even so much as an attempt to base it in fact.

Discipline your children however you want to. But don't pretend that your method is more humane, because it just isn't.


RE: It called parenting
By cjohnson2136 on 10/31/2011 10:14:13 AM , Rating: 1
No it escalates if parents are doing it WRONG. There was just a woman arrested because she put her kids in time-out by locking them in dog cages. There are people that do spankings wrong and their are people that do time-outs wrong. It doesn't make one method better then the other.

As for my parents my mom always cried after doing it because she felt so bad for doing it. That was one of the reasons why I would stop certain behavior because I didn't want to make her have to do something she didn't want to. Spanking itself is not abuse. A few taps with your hand on a butt are not going to hurt the child. If you take a belt or extension cord then yes that is abuse and has crossed the line, just like the mom locking her kids in a cage for time out is crossing the line.


RE: It called parenting
By Dr of crap on 10/31/2011 10:44:27 AM , Rating: 2
PLEASE,
Your taking this WAY to the extreme.
Spanking works.
Look at the violence of kids from the 30s-50s. There isn't much compared to today.
It was respect for your elders and respect for the law.
Kids today have neither, at least the majority of kids don't.
And we as a society let it be. My kids, on the other hand do have that respect. Why? Because I was the PARENT, and I swated them on the a$$ when needed.


RE: It called parenting
By cjohnson2136 on 10/31/2011 10:49:02 AM , Rating: 1
Dude I completely agree. I have been saying spanking works this entire time.


RE: It called parenting
By jang_clangle on 10/28/2011 4:20:16 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, that's what my brother always said, too. Now his 17 year old son is a convicted arsonist.

We had corporal punishment, and neither I nor my siblings are criminals. Add this personal experience to the anecdotal, yet overwhelming evidence I've been seeing all over for years that the hippy-dippy school of parenting creates little sociopaths.


RE: It called parenting
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 4:32:57 PM , Rating: 2
i'd agree because they don't respect the authority every blames someone else so they are not blamed for anything. To me a time out means nothing they sit in a spot for little bit and have nothing else happen.


tudy?
By AMDftw on 10/28/2011 12:00:12 PM , Rating: 2
typo just fyi :)




RE: tudy?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:14:41 PM , Rating: 2
Fixed ;)


Better picture
By Dr of crap on 10/28/2011 1:13:40 PM , Rating: 2
That e-trade kid in the crib is just right for this.

LOL, it perfect.




Too many people having children...
By tayb on 10/29/2011 1:21:45 PM , Rating: 2
The only thing I got for this is that way too many people who have no business procreating are procreating. Babies are watching Jersey Shore and playing with iPads instead of being read to. Just sad.




Just need to set limits
By DBissett on 10/30/2011 12:41:33 AM , Rating: 2
We are the parents of a 9 yr old. In infancy/toddler years we used the TV/videos to occupy our daughter morning, afternoon and evening while we did everything we had to do. We both worked. WE spent a lot of time with her, but there's also lots of time that adults have to be tending to adult stuff and videos are great attention occupiers. She got addicted to the TV, as evidenced by her being glued to it for years afterward. BTW, a lot of this time was spent with the Baby Einstein videos, which are kinda interesting and soothing, but which studies do not show do anything to improve learning. Now we're finding that in the fourth grade a lot of this TV time is being cut out due to necessity. School demands have taken over, and, interestingly, as she has become more interested in school classes and activities she doesn't complain about severe limits on TV time, e.g. none in the morning and a half hour after school during snack time, then homework, extracurricular classes, and maybe an hour in the evening. I think as a child ages parents just have to adjust TV/video time to the demands of reality. Whereas we once used the TV a lot, we/she doesn't need it so much now and everyone is fine. Parental limits are still very necessary, because if it were left up to her I think she'd leave the TV on 24/7. But TV limits work when the child has something else to do.




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