backtop


Print 69 comment(s) - last by squirrelfriend.. on Jan 27 at 7:38 PM

Professor observes a large proportion of criticism of violent games come from the over 35 age demographic

Texas A&M International University professor Christopher Ferguson conducted a study and concluded there is "no significant relationship" between school shootings and playing violent video games. Highlights of the study were summarized by Gamepolitics.

Ferguson's study criticizes the methodology used by past studies that have linked violent video games to aggression. He points out for recent high profile shootings such as the Virginia Tech massacre, and the Utah Trolley Stop mall shooting no evidence of violent video game play by the perpetrator was found.  

Ferguson suggests video games are an easy target to attack for politicians, the news media, and social scientists. He also suggests self serving motivations are what drive these groups. Politicians are motivated by the need to create an appearance they are taking action against crime, for the news media negative news 'sells' better than positive news, for social scientists, it has been observed that a small group of researchers have been most vocal in promoting the anti-game message.  In comparison he states, "Actual causes of violent crime, such as family environment, genetics, poverty, and inequality, are oftentimes difficult, controversial, and intractable problems."

A very interesting observation Ferguson makes is that the majority of individuals critical of video games are above the age of 35 and have not directly experienced the game they are criticizing which some admit to. According to Ferguson, "commentators make claims betraying their unfamiliarity, such as that games like Grant Theft Auto ‘award points’ for antisocial behavior... despite that few games award points for anything anymore, instead focusing on stories." 

As an example of individuals who criticize games without verifying their claims, Ferguson points to the Cooper Lawrence, Mass Effect incident. Without playing the game Cooper Lawrence declared Mass Effect as pornography on Fox News. The resulting backlash forced Lawrence to recant her statements.

Ferguson summarized his findings stating, "The wealth of evidence... fails to establish a link between violent video games and violent crimes, including school shootings. The link has not merely been unproven; I argue that the wealth of available data simply weighs against any causal relationship."

With regards to school shootings he declares, "School shootings, although exceedingly rare, are an important issue worthy of serious consideration. However, for our understanding of this phenomenon to progress, we must move past the moral panic on video games and other media and take a hard look at the real causes of serious aggression and violence."



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Well
By yacoub on 1/26/2009 8:26:42 AM , Rating: 5
The reality is that exposing oneself to violent media can and usually does have negative effects on a person's character, demeanor, outlook, etc, however gradual they might be in most cases.
It's just that school shootings isn't one of those effects. That's just an effect of being batsh*t crazy.




RE: Well
By Moishe on 1/26/2009 8:47:51 AM , Rating: 5
The gradual "negative effect" you speak of has to be simple desensitization to violence. It's sad that we live in a world such as this, but the removal of naivety isn't necessarily "bad".

It takes a certain twisted personality to translate depictions of violence into new acts of horror. Sure, if we had no violence and we all lived in a bubble, then maybe one or two of these crazies would not be "pushed" over the edge... but you don't blame the straw for the failure just because it was the last straw.


RE: Well
By Steve1981 on 1/26/2009 9:20:45 AM , Rating: 4
But it is soooo much easier to blame the straw than try to actually address the root causes of our problems (which tend to be of our own making).


RE: Well
By StevoLincolnite on 1/26/2009 10:04:39 AM , Rating: 4
I was actually always amazed how "Researchers" found links stemming from Video games to the real world, with shootings etc'.

However, why is it we never hear about someone who plays Viva Pinata that goes and Terraforms there backyard and collect Pinata's? Not "Hardcore" enough I suppose.


RE: Well
By Moishe on 1/26/2009 11:00:59 AM , Rating: 2
Funny thing is I've been playing violent video games for most of my life. I also own guns and fast cars and I love sex and hot chicks.

Despite these facts, never once have I shot anyone, run anyone over, or raped anyone. I know plenty of people fit into this category with me. We're normal, sane guys. It's the crazies that stand out and the douchebag, mother-hen types that restrict MY freedom because of a small fraction of lunatics.


RE: Well
By MrPoletski on 1/26/2009 11:53:18 AM , Rating: 3
well given the amount of pr0n on my hard disk I'd say I should have raped the entire country by now.

gah, and given the amount of frags I've tallied up in my lifetime...

CHA-CHAK, right, world, your mine.

All your flags are belong to me.


RE: Well
By MrPoletski on 1/26/2009 11:48:52 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
I was actually always amazed how "Researchers" found links stemming from Video games to the real world, with shootings etc'.


Well given the level of idiocy amongst some people actually put there to serve us, I'd say it's not too hard to imagine why. It goes something like this:

1) I heard that somebody got shot by a gun.
2) I saw a game where you go around shooting people with pretend guns in a pretend game world.
3) Therefore 1 is due to 2.
4) Shut up I'm right, you hater.

That, sadly, is how it goes.

"The burden of intelligence is endless contempt":- Dave B


RE: Well
By jhb116 on 1/27/2009 1:09:20 AM , Rating: 3
And then they are rewarded with a Nobel Prize of some sort....


RE: Well
By Phlargo on 1/26/2009 11:52:31 AM , Rating: 5
I flat out disagree that video game violence results in experience fatigue to real violence. It is a whole different world to see someone splattered with blood in a video game than it is in real life.

I've seen a lot of the former and at least a little of the latter and I'll tell you, if anything I'm more attuned to the horrors of real mutilation having seen the depiction of it video games and movies. Experience fatigue can happen in many contexts, but the simulation of violence in games is a far cry from the raw experience of seeing a human being injured by another. Even the threat of violence in public makes me uncomfortable - when people even act like they are going to fight it brings an adrenal response.

In a game, I can run around with a baseball bat beating in the heads of innocents (not that I've ever even done that) and might even revel in the visceral thrill of watching the bodies fall limp. If I were to see that in real life, I would probably puke my guts out. Even in a movie it would be horrible and uncomfortable.

It's a big difference and I think that if you're over about 12, you know it. Even having said that, I played plenty of violent games as a child having grown up with the birth of the Nintendo and graphic computer games and don't feel as though it negatively informed my relationship to violence aversion.


RE: Well
By squirrelfriend on 1/27/2009 7:38:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's sad that we live in a world such as this


I would just like to point out:
The dark ages, witch hunts, treatment of Native Americans, slavery, the Holocaust, Vietnam... countless other acts of human indecency.

things have gotten much better. i can't say it's great, but when compared to the rest of history its pretty damn good.


RE: Well
By MrBlastman on 1/26/2009 9:32:46 AM , Rating: 3
Well, I don't know about you but I was running around college hopped up on stim packs trying to keep my professors from spawning more overlords with my +3/+3 minigun. Unfortunately, for some reason I was never able to complete my spaceport in time...

I'd argue that exposure to this hippie junk on TV nowadays such as Teletubbies and Elmo are having a far greater effect on the development of our young humans than a casual game of Doom. Have you ever tried watching Teletubbies? I can see an infants potential IQ dropping by the second with that show.

Elmo? Come on - he's the poster child for a pussified America. Did you know that rated the original Sesame Street episodes "R" ??? I bet you didn't know that... but it is true! The Sesame Street of old taught character, it taught you life was tough and it taught you that people learned to deal with it. None of this flowery "hoo-haa" that they have on nowadays.

No, I'd say that fantasy programming that is being subjugated to our young ones at a pliable phase of their neural growth is far worse for society as a whole. The media won't let you think that though...


RE: Well
By DeepBlue1975 on 1/26/2009 12:13:08 PM , Rating: 2
I don't agree completely, I think the effects should be pretty minimal from just media exposure, provided the individual's living environment is a non violent one.

Usually the media just throws things that people accessing the media like or wants to see more frequently.

If people weren't fond of violent scenes or games in the first place, no one managing any media's business would care to use violent images (images being: any representation of violence, not just visual images) as a marketing strategy, because they wouldn't have sufficient interested people to make the "violence business" viable enough.

Make no mistake, if a news show floods the dumb box with crudely violent images, it isn't because they want to impose violence, but rather because they already know that it is a tried and true strategy that works wonders and captures the most massive amounts of audiences amongst those who represent the show's target public.


RE: Well
By redeem4god on 1/26/2009 12:41:51 PM , Rating: 2
Everyone is exposed to violence throughout their life everyday in one form or another. Media builds their ratings primarily on violence or depression.

To voice that is simply to say that there is an inevitable conclusion that we ALL will be affected which is not true. The stability of ones emotional prowess resides heavily on ones own ability to have discipline. Addictions cannot control you unless you "allow" them to do so.

Likewise video games can only affect you if you allow them to. While I agree that those with a weaker intellectual stance are more apt to have the deck stack against them, they too still have the ability to control what does or does not affect them.

This study is one of the smallest that I have heard of out of the same 8 studies done this year alone. There are over 100 million gamers in the world if not more and the best this study could do is 800+?

the sad fact is that humans are always looking to blame some form of mental illness, material addiction or substance issue for the worlds propensity for violence. this same violence practically dating back to the dawn of man when we wielded the first weapon.


RE: Well
By descendency on 1/26/2009 12:55:03 PM , Rating: 2
In most people, it's a small effect.

In those people who are under 18 and can not handle voilent games (those suffering from illnesses and other problems that cause violent actions), they should not have these games.

I once heard a lady say that games caused kids to be violent. Her example was a boy who lived with his mom and his dad was serving in Iraq during most of the young boys early life, so he wasn't around much.

Did she ever once consider a young boy who plays these games with no father figure to explain limits who probably also has ADD is not a good candidate to be parented by video games. Nope.

Quite simply, the problem isn't that games are universally bad or that they are universally good. They have impacts on people and some people should not have those impacts.


RE: Well
By Reclaimer77 on 1/26/2009 6:43:50 PM , Rating: 1
I totally agree. Parents have a huge impact on this behavior. But because it's a taboo subject, they don't seem to put violence in games and movies in context for children.

My father nipped that shit in a bud when I was real young. I glorified violence as a kid, truth be told. I was angry about some stuff I guess.

My father bought me a BB gun. Now I know what your thinking, 'wtf, how's that going to help !?' But it took me YEARS to realize how smart this was. He bought me the gun and then took me to the woods to practice on some birds. Sure enough, somehow, I finally shot a big Blue Jay. But it was able to half fly half dive into the woods, wounded.

I was pretty excited and proud of myself, until my father said it wouldn't be right to leave a bird wounded, and that we would have to go into the woods and put him out of his misery. After a few minutes of searching and listening, we found the bird.

On that day all my preconceptions about guns and violence changed. It's one thing to watch people on TV shoot bullets and hit other people with them and watch them go into an almost painless silent quick death. It's quite different to have a bird I wounded staring up at me, looking me right in the eyes I could have sworn, and just waiting helplessly for you to end his life. No matter how much I cried and told my dad I couldn't do it, he would just tell me I had to. And, finally, I did...

On that day, at such a young age, I learned about life and death. It's not a game. There was no winner or loser. I wasn't the hero or the gunslinger.

I still loved action movies and video games (when the Nintendo finally came) but I had a respect and appreciation for life. And I knew right from wrong.


RE: Well
By dubldwn on 1/26/2009 1:08:55 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
The reality is that exposing oneself to violent media can and usually does have negative effects on a person's character, demeanor, outlook, etc, however gradual they might be in most cases.

No, this is not reality, this is your opinion. An unfounded opinion.

If violent media (oxymoron) “usually does” cause “negative effects on a person's character, demeanor, outlook, etc”, what are the implications in the UK, the US, Germany, France, Australia, etc. where millions and millions of people regularly expose themselves to violent media? Are you saying that these people “usually” have issues with their character, demeanor, and outlook because of video games?


RE: Well
By Apprentice777 on 1/26/2009 1:50:00 PM , Rating: 2
What a person watches influences behavior. Guaranteed!! If you don’t believe it just ask people who produce advertisements. Trillions of dollars are spent every year because “smart people” understand that what a person watches influences behavior.


RE: Well
By erple2 on 1/26/2009 5:20:20 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
What a person watches influences behavior. Guaranteed!! If you don’t believe it just ask people who produce advertisements. Trillions of dollars are spent every year because “smart people” understand that what a person watches influences behavior.


This is like the antithesis of the Straw Man argument - make some completely benign yet pointless comparison between the original argument and what you've supplied.

You're equating something like influencing buying decisions (which people make all the time) to causing people to go out and kill people (which very few people do all the time). It's one thing to influence someone to buy their product X vs. competing Product Y, particularly when there's no personal objections involved in it (buying a Snuggie). However, there's no amount of advertising in the world that can get me to buy something that I can't stand (coffee, for example - I'll never buy coffee for myself, no matter how much you advertise).

No matter how much I blow heads off in VATS, gleefully giggling at the absurdity of it, I am pretty darned sure that I don't ever want to actually do that in real life.

However, I think of myself as sane and rational (at least in that respect).


RE: Well
By metasin on 1/26/2009 1:37:21 PM , Rating: 2
True we are very insensitive to violence today. However this was not always the case. People were exposed to much more "violent" actions before the industrial revolution. Consider watching your parents kill livestock for dinner or go hunting. Many people today get violently ill observing a chicken being killed and de-feathered, yet this was commonly done in the home. I am sure children even participated in preparing "dinner".

Also criminal punishments were often carried out in public. Imagine taking your children to the town square to observe an execution or lashing.

Did these experiences lead to increased violent behaviors?


RE: Well
By thinkthis on 1/26/2009 8:27:28 PM , Rating: 2
The problem is Texas A&M totally has a pro video game agenda. I've seen Aryan Nation members exhibit less bias serving as jury members for minorities. Also, my cousin Billy plays a lot of video games and he shot his dad and, even more tragically, his dog. So clearly, this study is flawed. Also these researchers are total morons, because as everyone knows, correlation isn't causation.

Researchers - 0
Me and the Wisdom of the Internets - Infinity


Personaly ...
By Bengalboy on 1/26/2009 9:10:28 AM , Rating: 4
Why doesnt someone do some research in to the effects of Religion and Killing.

Think we have a lot more problems there than GTA Series and alike.




RE: Personaly ...
By Larrymon2000 on 1/26/2009 9:39:56 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Why doesnt someone do some research in to the effects of Religion and Killing.


LOL by the time they complete this study, modern organized religion will be dead and gone with all the data they could bring up from the past 2000 years.


RE: Personaly ...
By rburnham on 1/26/2009 11:28:41 AM , Rating: 2
Indeed.


RE: Personaly ...
By Dreifort on 1/26/2009 10:08:50 AM , Rating: 1
School shootings usually involve peer pressure. Someone is perceived better than me, so I am going to shoot them to show them who is better. Almost pure jealousy or hatred toward those who outwardly show themselves as being "better".

While this same ideology could also explain extreme-Islamic violence (especially against the US), it is usually a different reasoning for Religious violence.

Violence and Religion usually pertain to difference of who is wrong or right. Not about who is better than me. You can be dirt poor or filthy rich. But if you worship a diff god, then most (not all) religions will react violently...physically or verbally.


RE: Personaly ...
By afkrotch on 1/26/2009 11:50:06 AM , Rating: 1
I wouldn't say any religion does anything. Condemn the few extremists, not the religion as a whole. Well, except for maybe Scientology.


RE: Personaly ...
By MrPoletski on 1/26/2009 11:56:47 AM , Rating: 1
I agree.

The thing about scientology is that you need to be some kind of extremist not to see through that crap.


RE: Personaly ...
By Triple Omega on 1/26/2009 3:53:33 PM , Rating: 2
Well the problem with that is that those "few extremists" can have a big influence. Enough of an influence to start entire (cival-)wars. Just look at Northern Ireland for example. It may start with a few extremists, but that doesn't mean it can't grow from there.

This is the main reason why I think organised religion is one of the worst things to happen to the world, next to religious people (trying to) enforcing there beliefs and values on non-religious people and people of different religions.(abortion, gay-marriage, stemcell-research, euthanasia, etc.) There are religions that do not have these problems, but they are a minority.

Also if you look a little farther into the past you can see that religions as a whole most definately did preform actions. Just a few hundred years ago the pope was still calling crusades and those weren't just supported by a few extremists. No, they were full blown armies. Actually they were one of the strongest forms of military action of the day.

So in the end most religions did and do try to enforce there ways onto others and have and can still start full blown (civil-)wars. So I think religion as a whole has done and will do more harm then good.

A little reading material on religious wars:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religious_war


RE: Personaly ...
By Motoman on 1/26/2009 11:51:02 AM , Rating: 3
Research it? Read any history book ever published. Religion is the greatest force for destruction ever invented by man...far and away, no comparison.

But, since it gets couched in the concept of "good people are religious" you can't fight it. By the same token, when "good" people are a member of your religion, that indicates that members of other religions (or no religion) are "bad" people. Therefore installing the necessary inducement to kill them.


RE: Personaly ...
By metasin on 1/26/2009 1:29:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Religion is the greatest force for destruction ever invented by man...far and away, no comparison.


Some form of idea superiority is a common connection to appalling human behavior. Not religion per se. Hitler, Pot, Tse-tung, Lenin/Stalin have destroyed more human lives than any religious movement. The justification was purely secular not religious.

The "My social ideas are so important that it justifies....." rationale is not necessarily limited to religion.


RE: Personaly ...
By Dreifort on 1/26/2009 1:54:50 PM , Rating: 2
isn't the superiority complex the same as peer pressure?


RE: Personaly ...
By Motoman on 1/26/2009 3:58:11 PM , Rating: 2
I'm no expert on many of those historical figures...but I can't believe you lumped Hitler in there. They basically co-opted/invented their own religion, and directly targeted Jews as the root of all their problems...??? Didn't Stalin outlaw religion?


RE: Personaly ...
By Moishe on 1/26/2009 4:26:51 PM , Rating: 3
Wrong.
Religious people are just humans. They have the same problems as everyone else.

Religion is a "group" of like minded people and when any group, religious or not, gets in the mind that killing is the thing to do... well then killing happens.

Nazis were a group, KKK, Hutu (Rwanda), etc, etc... You're blaming religion for basic human flaws.

Someone like you who is normally very reasonable on here surely has to admit that this is what humans do. Religion is just another type of group.


RE: Personaly ...
By kerpwnt on 1/26/2009 5:44:08 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You're blaming religion for basic human flaws.

Before this digresses into an "evil nature of man" argument, I would would like to state that this violent nature is rooted further up in our taxonomy. We are not the only species on this planet that attacks its own kind. Chimps, gorillas, lions, and wolves seem to have tendencies similar to mankind's violent xenophobia. However, humans do have larger social groups and superior technology which makes violence easier to execute.

Religion exacerbates the issue when scripture is cherry-picked for language that supports a violent disposition. Religion on its own and as a whole is not necessarily evil, but it can be a powerful weapon in sinister hands.


RE: Personaly ...
By callmeroy on 1/26/2009 12:26:17 PM , Rating: 2
This study has been going on for thousands of years and still is today...for study updates 24/7 just turn on your local news station.

Its called the Middle East.


RE: Personaly ...
By Scabies on 1/26/2009 1:02:42 PM , Rating: 2
No no, what you refer to has nothing to do with Religion, and everything to do with Bush.
</sarcasm>


hmmm
By MrBowmore on 1/26/2009 10:02:24 AM , Rating: 2
Study Finds "No Significant Relationship" Between School Shootings and Violent Video Games

No s**t. Try blaming the NRA for something similar and see what happens. America and Finland has 2 things in common, liberal gunlaws and schoolshootings.




RE: hmmm
By Steve1981 on 1/26/2009 10:51:10 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
America and Finland has 2 things in common, liberal gunlaws and schoolshootings.


While we could certainly do better about keeping guns out of the hands of criminals and the mentally ill with the benefit of modern technology, it is curious to note that while our gun laws were considerably more lax in the "old days" (1970 and before), school shootings were much rarer back then than they are today.


RE: hmmm
By kerpwnt on 1/26/2009 10:56:22 AM , Rating: 2
That's because people actually parented their children in the "old days."


RE: hmmm
By Steve1981 on 1/26/2009 12:03:39 PM , Rating: 2
Indeed.

Of course, I always find it curious how our society seems to equate "standard of living" with the quality of the lives we lead. I mean really, who is happier, a kid and his dad playing catch with a 10 dollar football, or a kid playing the latest iteration of Doom on a $5000 PC while his dad works extra hours to pay off said PC.


RE: hmmm
By callmeroy on 1/26/2009 12:32:39 PM , Rating: 2
...and the parents were actually ADULTS more often than not, today its kids having kids....

doesn't take a genius to figure out if 14 - 16 year olds are having kids, the chance of their kids being raised with any sense of work ethic, mature values, etc. drops lower than with a (assumingly) more mature adult.


RE: hmmm
By bmeanleet on 1/26/2009 9:14:30 PM , Rating: 2
I agree with part of your thought, yes allot more teenagers are having children than in the past but personally, I believe at first when work ethic isn't ingrained in kid aka 1-3 years of age is when said parents don’t have/realize the responsibilities they will have. Sooner or later though that said parent/parents will not make it unless they do work and in most cases the longer they take to peruse this, the more they will end up working thus teaching a better work ethic. In my case I was 17 when my daughter was born, and she has a great amount of time with me and her mother and she is one of the best behaved hardest working 5 year old I have ever seen, but I am a little bias :P.


Well...
By jadeskye on 1/26/2009 8:43:17 AM , Rating: 2
As soon as i finish this battleground i'm going to go to school and shoot every blood elf i see with my Gun+10!

seriously who pays these people to do these so called 'studies'?




RE: Well...
By dflynchimp on 1/26/2009 8:51:46 AM , Rating: 2
Lobbyists, Religious organizations, Agenda pushing azzhats


RE: Well...
By ebakke on 1/26/2009 9:21:45 AM , Rating: 2
This study? The video game industry.


RE: Well...
By callmeroy on 1/26/2009 12:29:19 PM , Rating: 2
No dude....you gotta go for the Taurens.....then you can hack them up and throw them in your freezer -- viola -- no added expense come this summer's BBQ season... :)


Next week's study will find a link
By Bateluer on 1/26/2009 9:18:39 AM , Rating: 2
I'm tired of this seesaw. One week, a study will find a link or correlation between the two. The next week, another study will find no relationship. The next week, another study will find a link again.

I'm all for research and study into human psychology and sociology, but these results are all over the place. Aren't the results of scientific experiments supposed to be consistent and repeatable?




By psychmike on 1/27/2009 8:22:09 AM , Rating: 2
You're right, it can be very frustrating to get a straight answer.

In materials or biological research, it's a lot easier to isolate variables and to slowly build up an argument for more complex effects.

In human research, however, it can be difficult to operationalize variables like 'exposure' or even 'violence'. When we say exposure, do we mean simply watching, participating, or enjoying violent games? When we say violence, do we mean biological correlates of sympathetic activation? Actual acts of violence? Violent thoughts? People are complicated and a lot of subtle but important individual differences may be washed out in large n studies.

When I was a starting graduate student, I used to skip to the discussion section of research articles to find THE ANSWER. These days, I spend a lot more time reading the method and results section to gleem little pieces of important information. The authors don't always set up or summerize their studies in an accurate way (even if they are very precise studies). Journalists put it through their own filter and spit out an even more simplified answer.

Considering that we live in a very technological and scientific society, I think we should all try to cultivate a basic scientific literacy so that policy makers and journalists don't end up cherry picking facts for us. Scientific American and New Scientist are eminently readable publications that get a little more into the issues.

My personal opinion (informed by science) is that violent video games may not statistically correlate with increased violence for MOST people, but this doesn't mean that it won't increase the risk of violence for impulsive, aggressive, and isolated individuals.


By psychmike on 1/27/2009 8:22:19 AM , Rating: 2
You're right, it can be very frustrating to get a straight answer.

In materials or biological research, it's a lot easier to isolate variables and to slowly build up an argument for more complex effects.

In human research, however, it can be difficult to operationalize variables like 'exposure' or even 'violence'. When we say exposure, do we mean simply watching, participating, or enjoying violent games? When we say violence, do we mean biological correlates of sympathetic activation? Actual acts of violence? Violent thoughts? People are complicated and a lot of subtle but important individual differences may be washed out in large n studies.

When I was a starting graduate student, I used to skip to the discussion section of research articles to find THE ANSWER. These days, I spend a lot more time reading the method and results section to gleem little pieces of important information. The authors don't always set up or summerize their studies in an accurate way (even if they are very precise studies). Journalists put it through their own filter and spit out an even more simplified answer.

Considering that we live in a very technological and scientific society, I think we should all try to cultivate a basic scientific literacy so that policy makers and journalists don't end up cherry picking facts for us. Scientific American and New Scientist are eminently readable publications that get a little more into the issues.

My personal opinion (informed by science) is that violent video games may not statistically correlate with increased violence for MOST people, but this doesn't mean that it won't increase the risk of violence for impulsive, aggressive, and isolated individuals.


The BIGGER Problem
By DtTall on 1/26/2009 9:43:23 AM , Rating: 2
The bigger problem is that, I think, is that the people claiming these relationships between violence and games have no idea just how common video games have become.

Just by a pure # of games sold comparison you are going to have more people that commit crimes playing video games - violent or not.

It reminds me of the 'correlation' you see between (fill in blank) and # of pirates in the world.




RE: The BIGGER Problem
By Dreifort on 1/26/2009 9:57:27 AM , Rating: 2
...between liberals in power and the # of pirates in the world.


By nah on 1/26/2009 8:29:37 AM , Rating: 2
have violence in their brain




Did the study...
By Dreifort on 1/26/2009 9:12:06 AM , Rating: 2
Did the study also find "no significant relationship" with the extreme gamer and going outside to take part in real life?

No, the shooting zombies for 18 hrs straight didn't make the kid shoot his classmates. It was the 7 days in front of TV while having no life.




Grant Theft Auto?
By TheHarvester on 1/26/2009 11:20:43 AM , Rating: 2
I totally had this vision of a game where Ulysses rides around with his cavalry division stealing carriages. Sorry... I've been playing Sid Meier's Gettysburg lately and it stuck out to me.




By BigToque on 1/26/2009 11:21:04 AM , Rating: 2
For most people, violent media doesn't do that much other that likely desensitize people to violent behaviour a little bit at a time. This doesn't cause people to go on a killing spree because most people are capable of reasoning out their actions.

I work with young adults with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

Many of the guys I work with often don't have an ability to reason out their actions. If something makes them upset (I took too long to go to the washroom, their social assistance cheque didn't come in today, the sun is yellow) they can get extremely upset.

I have seen first hand how much more aggressive and violent they get after putting on a 50 Cent CD and playing shooting games. Often times, it results in one of my guys ending up in jail again.

Do I blame 50 Cent or GTA? No, but I can appreciate that under certain conditions, they can be the factor that pushes someone over the edge, or brings them to a heightened level of emotion that the next "problem" will push them over the edge.

This doesn't account for everyone, but I wouldn't be surprised if there are a great deal of "normal people" that could be pushed over the edge with violent material in the same way.




Studies show...
By Hieyeck on 1/26/2009 11:28:22 AM , Rating: 2
It is in fact that we are learning by example from our parents watching violent TV and movies. Further studies show that it is actually our grandparents for listening to the heretic radio and spreading rock and roll.

Get over it. Don't go helping them by fighting anti-gaming or supporting pro-gaming studies. Treat it as it should be treated, a our generation's scapegoat for piss-poor parenting.




No time for killing
By rburnham on 1/26/2009 11:31:32 AM , Rating: 2
People that play video games are too busy playing to have the time to go out and kill. If more people had safe, fun hobbies, the world would be a better place.

If a video game can really alter a person's mind, changing them from a nice person into a sick, violent person, there is something wrong with their brain, not the game.




This comment....
By MrPoletski on 1/26/2009 11:44:13 AM , Rating: 2
Is brought to you by the Department Of Blindingly Obvious If Only Those Right Wingnuts Didn't Mouth Off Their Disinformation At Every Opportunity™

This post has been officially tested partisan free by the liberul media.




.
By itzmec on 1/26/2009 4:56:00 PM , Rating: 2
what would have this study found before video games?




By kattanna on 1/26/2009 5:15:16 PM , Rating: 2
Study Finds "No Significant Relationship" between its own findings and reality.

now thats one i'd like to see




and here it comes...
By 3v1lkr0w on 1/27/2009 5:02:01 AM , Rating: 2
Now for the study that proves 'studies that dont find a significant Relationship Between School Shootings and Violent Video Games are incorrect'...
This is never goin end. It is not video games fault or media for school shootings or other forms of violence...its the fact that these kids are stupid, or their parents suck. ive been watching rated R movies since i was 4 years old, playing games since i was 5...im 24, still havent killed anyone, stole a car, or beat a hooker cause a video games told me. Smart people know the difference between reality and a video game...




genetics and education...
By Screwballl on 1/26/2009 11:14:54 AM , Rating: 1
lets look at this from a realistic perspective:

If a person is raised with poor morals, genetics, education and lack of common sense, then they will see these video games as an outlet where it affects almost everything in their life and start becoming the animal they portray in these shootings... but in reality they tend to get caught for stupid shit like shoplifting, car theft, whatever with no real damage to life or property. Usually the time spent in prison is enough to show them that you can make a living off simple theft and sales (like drugs) but the heavier crimes carry more time that they stay away from. They spend so much time trying to keep up with everything that those games they played really has no impact anymore.

Now raise a kid properly and teach them the difference between a video game/tv show/movie and real life, and they will go on living a much smarter life. My 6 year old is already smarter than most 30 year olds I have met locally. Teach them to work for what they want instead of just be spoiled. If they want that new hot toy for $20, tell them their room needs to be cleaned how YOU want it, and if it is not done within a specific timeframe, then they do not get it. Start this fairly early, about 4 or 5 years old so they start off knowing what they need to do to get what they want. If they want the new violent video game at age 12, that will need extra chores and extra duties because of the stronger rating but also limit their time in the game.

Of course this falls on deaf ears most of the time, most people nowadays (not referring to most DT readers) would rather have the easy life, including how they raise their kids, so that translates into a spoiled and stupid kid.




Why can't people just accept...
By FaceMaster on 1/26/09, Rating: -1
RE: Why can't people just accept...
By Dreifort on 1/26/2009 10:16:31 AM , Rating: 2
but I find GTA violence funny and amusing in the privacy of my own home. But I never have the urge or tendency to go out and punch a hooker.

What about violence from playing Madden football? Just playing the CPU, the game cheats and can draw violent reactions to the game turning against you. Or if you play against someone else and you just get mad from losing.

It doesn't just have to be violent shoot'em up games to draw violence out of an individual. Just lack of real life experiences can keep ppl/kids from learning how to deal with failure.


RE: Why can't people just accept...
By FaceMaster on 1/26/09, Rating: 0
RE: Why can't people just accept...
By Moishe on 1/26/2009 11:36:32 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
...But I never have....


he IS speaking for himself.


By Dark Legion on 1/26/2009 10:31:23 AM , Rating: 2
Wow...I actually can't tell if you're serious or not, but either way that's some twisted logic.


By MrBlastman on 1/26/2009 10:33:54 AM , Rating: 3
Look, just because I got a HUGE smile on my face from playing "Paratrooper" on my 286, it has never lead to me sitting in my back yard with a mobile anti-aircraft gun blasting away into the sky just trying to knock people out of the air.

Get real.

So it is better to ignore the fact that we, as people, think impure thoughts about other people and places - and, being prudent individuals, if we never act upon these in any fashion within a game we will keep them bottled up inside indefinitely? Or, would it be better to act them out in a controlled environment (your living room on your couch) within a fantasy setting, allowing us to relieve stress in a harmless way? Psychologists agree that it is WORSE to leave stress un-dealt with rather than to find a constructive means of releasing it...


RE: Why can't people just accept...
By Moishe on 1/26/2009 11:33:22 AM , Rating: 2
Your definition of right and wrong are skewed.
Playing games is not wrong. You have a personal opinion about violent games. I accept that and I am glad you and I have the right to have opinions, but it doesn't make your opinion right, or wrong.


By nycromes on 1/26/2009 1:39:00 PM , Rating: 1
I guess we shouldn't have cars either because obviously having cars leads people to kill others in drunk driving accidents. /sarcasm off


“So far we have not seen a single Android device that does not infringe on our patents." -- Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith











botimage
Copyright 2015 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki