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Chinese pollution by exports contributed up to 12 percent to 24 percent of daily sulfate concentrations in the western United States

Despite the fact that manufacturing has largely been moved to China over the years, a new study shows that the western United States is being affected by pollution coming from across the Pacific. 
 
According to The New York Times, air quality is taking a hit in the western United States due to items being exported from China. The study was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by nine scholars. 
 
The study, led by Jintai Lin -- a professor in the department of atmospheric and oceanic sciences at Peking University’s School of Physics -- showed that Chinese pollution by exports contributed up to 12 percent to 24 percent of daily sulfate concentrations in the western United States. 
 
In addition, the study found that sulfate concentrations went up by up to 2 percent while ozone and carbon monoxide levels saw slight increases in the western United States back in 2006. 
 
Ultimately, researchers discovered that 36 percent of anthropogenic sulfur dioxide, 27 percent of nitrogen oxides, 22 percent of carbon monoxide and 17 percent of black carbon from Chinese emissions were linked to producing exported goods -- and about 21 percent of export-related emissions from China (for each pollutant) came from exports that traveled from China to the United States.
 
This is largely due to the fact that the production of exported goods in China grew 390 percent in volume between 2000 and 2007. This has caused a rise in fossil fuels (especially coal).
 
While Chinese manufacturing is a cause of U.S. pollution, winds called "westerlies" -- which send chemicals across the Pacific Ocean in a matter of days -- are major culprits. Western states in the U.S. have seen accumulations of dust, ozone and carbon.


[SOURCE: whiteoliphaunt.com]

The researchers in the study were able to calculate these conditions in 2006 through the use of a modeling system called GEOS-Chem, which utilized data on economics and emissions.

"Consideration of international cooperation to reduce trans-boundary transport of air pollution must confront the question of who is responsible for emissions in one country during production of goods to support consumption in another," the study's authors wrote.

So how is this problem supposed to be fixed? Don Wuebbles, co-author of the study and professor of atmospheric science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, suggested that the efficiency of manufacturing processes be improved and energy production be re-examined. 

"Pollution from China is having an effect in the U.S., and we need to recognize how that is affecting both our background ozone levels and also particulates that are reaching the West Coast," said Wuebbles. 

China's pollution problem is no secret. In July 2013, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) study said that heavy pollution in northern China causes citizens in that area to have lower lifespans than those in the south. In fact, the study says that the 500 million people who live north of the Huai River will lose 2.5 billion years of life expectancy because of air pollution. More specifically, each northerner has a 5.5-year drop in life expectancy compared to southerners. 

Last month, China was having smog problems to the point of closing schools and delaying or canceling flights. But the Chinese media put quite a spin on these recent problems with pollution, insisting that there are five benefits to choking on the air you breathe. These include that it unifies people; makes China more equal; raises citizen awareness of the cost of China's economic development; makes people funnier, and makes people more knowledgeable (of things like meteorology and the English word 'haze'). 

Way back in 2008, a NASA study said 15 percent of America's air pollution is from Asia. A year before that, China became the world's top CO2 emitter

Source: The New York Times



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Global Issue
By Flunk on 1/21/2014 12:07:51 PM , Rating: 2
Air pollution is a global problem and we're just as much at fault for this as the Chinese are. We're the ones who buy all the stuff manufactured over there without caring what it does to air quality.




RE: Global Issue
By FITCamaro on 1/21/14, Rating: 0
RE: Global Issue
By josh_b on 1/21/2014 12:43:01 PM , Rating: 4
So the solution is to bring the polluters back here and remove fair wages, right? The pollution controls are also part of the reason why these same companies initially left. They won't return even if wages were lowered because right now for the most part they can seemingly pollute with impunity.


RE: Global Issue
By FITCamaro on 1/21/14, Rating: 0
RE: Global Issue
By Ammohunt on 1/21/2014 2:10:43 PM , Rating: 3
We can produce the same stuff here with negligible emissions(its been done before). The Chinese are not culturally or politically equipped to implement cleaner manufacturing techniques.

If Unionized labor didn't artificially inflate wages and government didn't over regulate the majority of American companies would not have off shored their production. On a side note with the current minimum wage increase debate going on i doubt manufacturing and consequently the jobs related to the industry will ever return to America.


RE: Global Issue
By TSS on 1/21/2014 7:56:51 PM , Rating: 4
Minimum wage was 23% higher in 1978 then it is today, corrected for inflation. Also, bread was 36% cheaper. In real terms, the standard of living for minimum wage earners has atleast halved, so it's a disgrace minimum wage isn't double of what it is.

Especially with record corperate profits. Those have certainly recovered from the recession. Or a record low effective corperate tax rate. If anything, there isn't enough regulation or demands from the unions - the RIGHT kind of regulations and demands that is.

As long as the people are content with leaders (not just politicians but union leaders and CEO's/stockholders as well) who consider their own pockets more important then the fate of a nation, yeah those jobs will never return. And honestly, considering how long the US population has been completly fine with that, it's probably (very likely even) already too late to change anything.


RE: Global Issue
By Ammohunt on 1/21/14, Rating: 0
RE: Global Issue
By Spuke on 1/21/2014 11:59:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The larger problem as i see it is that the majority of people that pantomime the 1% nonsense have no clue on how wealth is created and filtered down to everyone in society. I have never been employed by a poor person.
I think I just got wood.


RE: Global Issue
By evo slevven on 1/22/2014 1:23:07 AM , Rating: 2
I think the funniest part of this in the most ironic sense is that economically and politically speaking, this is actually purest form of Reganomics. I'm not a republican btw but its major failing point is what you hinted: increased living wages and standards. Businesses grew and wanted more revenue for expansion which ultimately resulted in little to no increase in the actual wages as far as the median and mean incomes for households adjusted for inflation are concerned. I perfectly agree with your overall statements. But at the end of the day, companies, Apple in particular, can make a killing selling a device and would find ways to continue reducing costs rather than offer more jobs domestically in the US or increase wages. I have to single them out as they have some of the highest margin-to-cost of a device.


RE: Global Issue
By Ammohunt on 1/22/2014 1:51:56 PM , Rating: 1
Most small to medium sized businesses try their hardest to run only minimally in the black reason being is that a ton of capital in the bank is money not working for the company at the same time creating a high tax profile.

Massively successful companies like Apple don't have that luxury since they couldn't possibly re invest that amount of cash back into the company as fast as they are making it. So they rightly off shore the money to avoid the ridiculous capital gains tax until such a time they can make that extra cash work for the company. Its a myth that the giant companies don't increase wages as their market share increases having worked for one of the largest software/hardware companies on the planet i can attest to their wages being 20-30% higher than medium sized businesses for the same job. Either way these companies don't "owe" America jobs.

America needs to create an environment where it makes good business sense to use domestic labor that is done primarily by reducing labor costs and streamlining the regulation and taxation bureaucracy coupled with sensible tariff laws.


RE: Global Issue
By half_duplex on 1/22/2014 4:43:43 PM , Rating: 2
I attest also that the large companies pay hire wages than their smaller counterparts.

It's also MUCH MUCH easier to earn a pay increase.

Anyone who says otherwise is speaking only from what they heard on the news and in college.


RE: Global Issue
By half_duplex on 1/22/2014 4:52:39 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
As long as the people are content with leaders (not just politicians but union leaders and CEO's/stockholders as well) who consider their own pockets more important then the fate of a nation


So tired of hearing this silly argument. CEOs and stakeholders belong absolutely nowhere in this argument. They're responsible to no one besides their employees and the people who's capital they control. Nothing more nothing less. After all, all a company is is a group of people who belong to the "nation".


RE: Global Issue
By KCjoker on 1/22/2014 7:05:13 PM , Rating: 2
Compare the poor of 1978 to the poor of 2014. You'll see how the poor of today have it much better. Heck, you can be considered poor yet own a car, watch a 40+ TV with Cable/Satelite etc..today.


RE: Global Issue
By HrilL on 1/21/2014 12:35:38 PM , Rating: 5
I disagree. I don't have a choice most of the time where the products I buy are made. You can look all over for American made items and never have the option to buy them. Do not blame the consumers. This is caused by corporate greed to always have a lower price and the Chinese government for their failure to enact legislation to control their pollution problem. During the industrial revolution the US and UK had similar pollution issues. We even had smog so thick just as china is having in the 1950s in LA. We solved this by moving to curbing our emissions of pollutants. They can do they same but they want the fastest amount of growth possible. Extreme growth also causes a large economic void. China has brand new cities that no one can afford to live in. They have a real estate bubble that will break and will be far worse than the US housing bubble.


RE: Global Issue
By josh_b on 1/21/2014 12:46:25 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed. Besides, how many people have the time and knowledge to determine the country of origin of the components within their electronics, cars and other complex consumables? Even if you did have the time and the information you'd only be able to reduce your consumption of Chinese goods, not eliminate them entirely.


RE: Global Issue
By Flunk on 1/21/2014 12:58:36 PM , Rating: 2
That's basically impossible, cars have too many components and most brands have components manufacturer in 10+ countries. This is a systematic problem. It can't be solved on a consumer level.


RE: Global Issue
By Phoque on 1/23/2014 9:09:52 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
This is a systematic problem.

This is a systemic problem.


RE: Global Issue
By ssnova703 on 1/21/2014 4:13:08 PM , Rating: 2
Many people just blame the Chinese, but the reality is, who called the shots? Did the Chinese put a gun to the heads of American CEO's and say manufacture here?

No, it was OUR CEO's who made this move and movement, yes of course it's more logical from a business standpoint, but if you want to yell at anyone, yell at the corporate execs who made the decisions to move manufacturing, they are the ones to blame.

Then again, if you owned a company and wanted to stay competitive, you'd probably do the same. If just one of your competitors made the same product, but overseas in a country with lower standards of living and lower costs of manufacturing, and re-imported the product back and sold it for 1/3 the cost, money talks, you'd have to jump ship to stay with the game, in the end the consumer gets the same product for less money.

People here complain that they need to raise the wages there, but it's a catch 22 situation, if you really want to bring manufacturing back here, we'd have to be worth less than the Chinese, both in our currency and our human capital(ie: we would need a surplus of people in the workforce with less education to do these manual skill labors)... be careful what you wish for...

Catch 22...


RE: Global Issue
By ssnova703 on 1/21/2014 4:19:43 PM , Rating: 2
To clarify, I'm saying we should evolve as an Economy and there needs to be a balance, rather than looking being stuck as an industrial manufacturing nation, but the way things are set up and established now is that we have moved far away, economically(in our standpoint) from manufacturing. It still makes sense to manufacture here to an extent, for example. Take Automobiles for example, especially for the foreign manufacturers who don't have to ship from their countries.

I think we should progress into an educated work force with a niche. We still have agriculture, R&D for aerospace and military, etc. It's very difficult and currently(could change with the way we've been printing money) illogical to compete in manufacturing on a massive scale against nations with lower standards of living and currencies worth less than ours.


RE: Global Issue
By JediJeb on 1/22/2014 5:51:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
, in the end the consumer gets the same product for less money.


If only we did get the same product, but it seems lately that the quality of the product has fallen quite a bit for most things and we no longer have the option to pay more for higher quality versions of the same products. Things we used to buy that would last for 10 years or more now only last about 2 years or less and cost only a little less than what the better products did.

For example I have an older Norelco razor that I have been using for over 10 years, it was made in Norway. My father has gone through 3 Norelco razors in the last 4 years, and looking at them they were all made in China. The cost was almost the same on the ones he bought as the one I have.


RE: Global Issue
By Solandri on 1/21/2014 5:29:31 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I don't have a choice most of the time where the products I buy are made. You can look all over for American made items and never have the option to buy them. Do not blame the consumers. This is caused by corporate greed to always have a lower price and the Chinese government for their failure to enact legislation to control their pollution problem.

Too many people who've never run a business are too quick to blame businesses for problems they themselves cause.

This is completely the consumers' fault. You complain you can't find any American-made items to buy. This isn't because of some conspiracy by corporations to move all manufacturing to China to cut costs.

The reason this happened is that consumers buy what is cheapest without regard for where it was made. All the companies who cared and tried to sell American-made goods went out of business because not enough consumers were buying their products. That's the reason nearly all companies manufacture in China - it wasn't by choice, it was by the process of elimination.

The consumers is the one with the power of choice. You can choose to buy American or Chinese. The only harm that comes from buying American is that it costs you a little more money. Your buying American or Chinese doesn't remove you from the market (unless you buy something that kills you). This is completely different from businesses - if consumers are buying Chinese and you insist on selling American, you go bankrupt and are eliminated from the market. The only choice the corporations have in this is between survival and bankruptcy.

It's the consumer who has the choice . And it's the consumer who has the power to change this. Unless their past choices have already eliminated any business trying to offer them an alternative choice. If that's the case, consumers have only themselves to blame.


RE: Global Issue
By sorry dog on 1/21/2014 8:43:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The reason this happened is that consumers buy what is cheapest without regard for where it was made. All the companies who cared and tried to sell American-made goods went out of business because not enough consumers were buying their products. That's the reason nearly all companies manufacture in China - it wasn't by choice, it was by the process of elimination.


Problem here is even if 1 out 4 people agree with you, you basically get out voted by the other 3 consumers. In addition to that you have retailer that have increased their buying power by virtue of national size (Walmart, Target, etc.), so that they have power over suppliers. This gave them a greater say so over quality over time relative to the consumer (Pollution is a product quality issue).

I don't see how this can be easily changed, but one factor that has speed up this trend is the lack of accountability at corporate level of curbing short-term behavior at the expense of long-term viability. This is something that shareholders have been short changed as quite often these production shifts to China may have had short-term gains but often at the expense of quality erosion or even more direct damage such as I.P. theft. Unfortunately, the those that won the benefit of the deal are usually long gone with their winnings.


RE: Global Issue
By Spuke on 1/22/2014 12:09:37 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
This is completely the consumers' fault. You complain you can't find any American-made items to buy. This isn't because of some conspiracy by corporations to move all manufacturing to China to cut costs.
BAM! This should be tattooed on every idiots forehead (in Mandarin) that claims otherwise.


RE: Global Issue
By Spuke on 1/22/2014 12:05:32 AM , Rating: 2
Yes, lower prices are always the fault of corporate greed. WTF? Really? Lower prices is the DIRECT result of CONSUMER demand! YOU want that $20,000 EV, guess what? In order for a manufacturer to make such a vehicle, they MUST find a way to cut costs. If you want this to stop, quit buying cheap, foreign made consumer items. PAY for US made only items even if that means you do without that item (which forces them to cater to what you want). WE are to blame for this. Geezus! Sometimes I am speechless at the sheer level of ignorance demonstrated here.


RE: Global Issue
By Divide Overflow on 1/21/2014 12:50:21 PM , Rating: 3
It's a global problem, but we don't get any say on how clean China's manufacturing and production infrastructure is. The US should be hitting China with trade tariffs over this.


RE: Global Issue
By ClownPuncher on 1/21/2014 12:58:14 PM , Rating: 2
It's up to them to run their own country and care about the lives of their citizens, which they don't.

The same idea applies to all of the goods the US manufactures and sells in Europe. Europe isn't responsible if we pollute.


RE: Global Issue
By Shadowself on 1/21/2014 2:05:26 PM , Rating: 2
This is short sighted, naive and wrong.

It's up to the world to go after the extreme polluters.

Don't think it can be done? It can and it has.

Back in the 70's when the U.S. had barely any real political relations with the PRC, the PRC was doing open air nuclear testing. A lot of the fallout settled on Japan and the U.S. (There were even the extreme environmental groups telling people NOT to drink milk in the U.S. due to Cobalt 60 fallout.) Both countries (though the U.S. was clearly the leader in this effort) were able to rally the international community to get the PRC to stop doing open air testing. It worked. They stopped.

By your view, the PRC needed to worry about people in the PRC, which they clearly didn't and still don't. But reality is the world needs to worry and do something.

There is no reason the world cannot do the same this time.


RE: Global Issue
By ClownPuncher on 1/21/2014 3:20:38 PM , Rating: 3
You missed the point. In the blame game, China is at fault. I'm not against pressuring China to stop, but blaming the average US consumer is illogical and unproductive.

China was at fault back then, too.


RE: Global Issue
By Reclaimer77 on 1/21/2014 4:45:33 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
This is short sighted, naive and wrong.

It's up to the world to go after the extreme polluters.


Yeah right. Let's violate the sovereignty of a country, and possibly start a military conflict or war, because they are polluting more than we'd like.

And please, comparing air quality to exploding NUKES in the goddamn air is a big difference. And you know it.

The biggest difference is, obviously, China's entire economy didn't depend on military nuke testing. But if you think they're going to bring their Industrial Revolution to a halt and crash their economy over air pollution, you are nuts.

Imagine how America or Britain would react if China or some other power told them during the Industrial Revolution they needed to pollute less? Please! We wouldn't have stood for it.


RE: Global Issue
By rdhood on 1/21/2014 1:58:55 PM , Rating: 2
... Just another study that lets China off the hook in order to lay the blame on "the rich" countries.

Let's make this clear: ANY country, no matter how rich, can institute pollution laws. If they don't, it is THEIR fault... not the fault of the countries that they are creating goods for. Making it the fault of the "demand" countries is like blaming a women who gets raped for wearing a skirt. Pollution, like rape, is ALWAYS the fault of the perpetrator.


RE: Global Issue
By Reclaimer77 on 1/21/2014 4:21:18 PM , Rating: 1
Your entire post had two points, and both were horribly wrong.

quote:
Air pollution is a global problem and we're just as much at fault for this as the Chinese are.


We are? Last time I checked we had clean air standards and tight regulations on pollution. China doesn't. How is this our fault?

quote:
We're the ones who buy all the stuff manufactured over there without caring what it does to air quality.


We are? PLENTY of people buy's Chinese goods. The whole world does.

Horrible post, you should get a -6 for it here. Misplaced blame, bereft of any facts or logic. Truly rubbish! You didn't even offer a single suggestion on fixing the problem.


RE: Global Issue
By boeush on 1/21/2014 7:24:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
How is this our fault?
Two words: Free Trade.

That's how. If we imposed environmental tariffs on all goods made overseas, in amounts commensurate to the environmental damage done, on average, by their respective manufacturing processes, then we'd be more justified in saying that it's not our fault.

By allowing industry to skirt our pollution standards by shifting manufacturing to unregulated nations, then importing the finished goods without being held accountable for the incurred ecological damage, we are complicit .


RE: Global Issue
By Reclaimer77 on 1/21/2014 7:52:01 PM , Rating: 2
Okay Mr Butterfly Effect. Ridiculous logic.

China is responsible for China. Period.


RE: Global Issue
By boeush on 1/21/2014 8:12:00 PM , Rating: 1
If China used slave labor to manufacture its products, and we gladly bought those extra-cheap products while turning a blind eye to the slave issue, would we be blame-free in your opinion?

(By the way, the above scenario is only a slight exaggeration of the other set of 'benefits' we derive from our Free Trade with China -- and is the main reason why our wages are stagnant, population employment ratio dismal and deteriorating, national debt and trade deficits ballooning, and standards of living falling on average...)

I understand this hits your favorite economic religion a tad below the belt. But it richly deserves it, so Deal With It... (That's three Periods for you)


RE: Global Issue
By Reclaimer77 on 1/21/2014 8:36:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
(By the way, the above scenario is only a slight exaggeration of the other set of 'benefits' we derive from our Free Trade with China -- and is the main reason why our wages are stagnant, population employment ratio dismal and deteriorating, national debt and trade deficits ballooning, and standards of living falling on average...)


I didn't know Obama was Chinese, interesting :)


RE: Global Issue
By boeush on 1/21/2014 8:51:59 PM , Rating: 1
Apparently you need me to connect the dots for you. Very well:

Ultra-low wages and lack of strong environmental regulation in third-world nations, combined with Free Trade pacts U.S. insists on making with such nations, are the main reasons why the U.S. economy shifted from productive to consumptive (with 70+% of the economy now famously relegated to "services").

This did not begin under Obama, or even this century. It's been an ongoing bloodletting for the overall U.S. economy since at least 1980, when the Most Favoured Nation status was granted to China.

(Not that China is the only example of how U.S. insists on economically eviscerating itself via short-term benefit and long-term decimation effects of Free Trade with third-world nations. It just so happens that China is the largest of the economic vampires attached to America's jugular.)


RE: Global Issue
By JZavala on 1/21/2014 6:14:23 PM , Rating: 2
i love how so many are quick to blame the unions.

did nobody notice that america was prospering and leading the world in prosperity when the unions were at their strongest?

i would say that corporate greed and maximizing the most in profits has lead to our current problems.

the fact that fast food chains are making record profits, and that due to the recession, most people working these jobs aren't teenagers for the most part.

what i'd like to see is a more reasonable approach to minimum wage, based on age, and company net income. having one set standard across the board isn't working.

small companies can't afford to pay 10/hr to a 16-18 year old. and people stuck working a dead end job because they can't go to some type of schooling for a new career are stuck because they have too many bills and cant afford to reduce their hours with their near minimum wage paying job while the chain is making record profits.


RE: Global Issue
By JediJeb on 1/22/2014 6:27:05 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
small companies can't afford to pay 10/hr to a 16-18 year old. and people stuck working a dead end job because they can't go to some type of schooling for a new career are stuck because they have too many bills and cant afford to reduce their hours with their near minimum wage paying job while the chain is making record profits.


What gets me is that the people most demanding the $10-15/hour minimum wage for people working in fast food are in places like New York City. Tell me why the same house built in NYC that cost $800,000 can be built in Kentucky for less than $200,000? Just as I bought a small 800 sqft log house here on 3 acres for $42K, somewhere near NYC that same house and property would cost me more than 10 times as much. What has so ruined most of our economy is people who actually allow the prices of things in such places to skyrocket because instead of refusing to pay ever higher prices, they go ahead and pay them just so they can have what everyone else has. We have raised at least two generations of consumers that are more driven by prestige and presence than they are by practicality. They demand to have all the big ticket items right now which causes them to need higher wages to "keep up" with everyone else, which forces the prices of goods made here up, which has forced our manufacturing overseas.

In a sense, the poor wanting what the middle class has, and the middle class wanting what the rich have, all without actually working to save the money to purchase those things, has been a snowball that has rolled downhill for too long. The desire for instant elevation from one class to another is what has caused the lower classes to grow so much. People try to lift themselves up, but when they can't do it immediately they become discouraged and give up and then they become stagnated and their net worth actually falls. I have seen people who have set their mind to living within their means, saving money for long term goals and end up going from dirt poor to being fairly well off later in life, and if you look at most rich people today that is how they had to get there.

quote:
did nobody notice that america was prospering and leading the world in prosperity when the unions were at their strongest?


That was also a time when people would work hard for what they had instead of thinking they should be able to just sit around and have everything given to them. The work ethic of the generation that lived when this country was such an economic powerhouse and manufacturing leader in the world was much better than what the up and coming generation has now. Back then people expected to come home from work sore and tired, and if they were lucky they could get in a little recreation on the weekend, now we have a generation that believe they should return home from work still rested and ready go to party all night every night of the week. Seriously, this is what my company has just experienced while trying to hire new people. We hired one the week before Christmas, she then wanted the week of Christmas off with pay, after working one week! When she was told that she only got Christmas day off she quit, and asked if we would rehire her after Christmas. We had two more we hired and they quit after two weeks because they were required to work too much. They had simple data entry jobs, but because they were not allowed to send text messages and talk on their phones except during breaks and lunch it was too much work. I sometimes don't think it is so much that there are more poor people, but simply more people who believe they are poor because they think they should have much more than they do without the need to actually work for what they have.


RE: Global Issue
By marvdmartian on 1/22/2014 7:56:51 AM , Rating: 2
True, to an extent. But who's going to be the first person willing to step forward, and declare that they're willing to lower their standard of living, by buying more expensive products, without a commensurate raise in pay??

It's just like the weather....everyone complains about it, but no one does anything about it.

A bigger problem is that while Obama and the EPA continue to shut down coal burning power plants, and prevent the building of new ones, it in no way prevents that coal from being burned. The coal companies are simply shipping more of it overseas, where their power plants don't have the pollution controls that US coal burning plants already have in place. This results in more pollution entering the atmosphere, world-wide.

But hey, I'm sure Obama sleeps better at night.


The other side of the same coin
By powerwerds on 1/21/2014 1:02:27 PM , Rating: 2
Pollution experts now agree that the US has managed to decrease the level of pollution in the air over manufacturing areas all across the country by an estimated 75%. This was also favorably accompanied by a significant decrease in price of the manufactured goods. This win - win was made possible by the great efforts of the Chinese nation.




RE: The other side of the same coin
By FITCamaro on 1/21/2014 2:00:13 PM , Rating: 4
Helps when there's no manufacturing.


RE: The other side of the same coin
By ClownPuncher on 1/21/2014 3:23:15 PM , Rating: 4
The US trails China in manufacturing by a few %. We are the second largest manufacturing nation in the world, with a fraction of the population China has.

It's not as good as we could be, but to imply the US manufactures nothing is staggeringly stupid.


RE: The other side of the same coin
By Spuke on 1/22/2014 12:13:04 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The US trails China in manufacturing by a few %. We are the second largest manufacturing nation in the world, with a fraction of the population China has. It's not as good as we could be, but to imply the US manufactures nothing is staggeringly stupid.
This is all true and I wish people would get off the we don't manufacture sh!it bandwagon.


RE: The other side of the same coin
By coburn_c on 1/22/2014 2:52:42 AM , Rating: 2
Don't worry, China's manufacturing bubble will collapse in the soon and the country will be returned to nature just like Detroit.


By half_duplex on 1/22/2014 5:02:03 PM , Rating: 2
LOL As soon as they realize they DONT have to live on a dollar a day and start forming companies that pay more... over.


cancelling my ebay order
By doughtree on 1/21/2014 12:06:43 PM , Rating: 3
i'm going to cancel my ebay order for that tooth paste squeezer thingie i bought from china!




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